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Canadian Federal Election Analysis 2015

Canadian Election Analysis 2015: Communication, Strategy, and Democracy offers timely and insightful reflections on the 2015 Canadian Federal Election from Canada's leading academics and political commentators.

Published just days after the election, these short pieces cover a wide-variety of interconnected themes, including strategic communication, mediatization, opinion research, electioneering, political management, public policy, polling, and e-politics, and explain how Canadian democracy has been affected. The authors provide authoritative analyses of the campaigns and election outcome to bring readers original ways of understanding the election.

These vibrant, informed pieces are written for journalists, researchers, pundits, students, and engaged citizens. They also provide a wealth of ideas for more in-depth investigation and writing on the election, Canadian politics, and democracy.

The open-access pdf was made available here on Monday, November 9th, 2015. Samara Canada is also hosting each of the pieces, beginning on November 9th, as a series on their blog at www.samaracanada.com.

Canadian Election Analysis 2015

Canadian Election Analysis 2015: Communication, Strategy, and Democracy
Edited by Alex Marland and Thierry Giasson

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To cite an article from Canadian Election Analysis 2015, please use the following wording:
<author name(s)>. 2015. <article title>, in Canadian Election Analysis 2015: Communication, Strategy, and Democracy. Accessed from http://www.ubcpress.ca/CanadianElectionAnalysis2015.

CONTENTS

1. ELECTION 2015: REFLECTIONS ON THIS PROJECT AND ON THE CAMPAIGN
1 | Editors’ Remarks: Recapping The 2015 Canadian Election
Anna Esselment, Thierry Giasson, Andrea Lawlor, Alex Marland, and Tamara A. Small

4 | Election 2015: Overview
Chris Waddell, Carleton University

6 | Election 42: What Happened?
Warren Kinsella, Daisy Group

8 | The End of the Harper Dynasty
Lawrence LeDuc, University of Toronto

2. THE RULES, REGULATIONS, AND REGIME OF THE CAMPAIGN
10 | Democratic Reform: From Campaign Promise to Policy Change
Maxwell A. Cameron, University of British Columbia

12 | Partisans and Elections: Electoral Reform is for Parliament to Address
Robert P. Shepherd, Carleton University

14 | Data-Driven Microtargeting in the 2015 General Election
Steve Patten, University of Alberta

16 | Political Parties, Campaigns, Data, and Privacy
Paul G. Thomas, University of Manitoba

18 | The Permanent Campaign Meets the 78-Day Campaign, and Falls Apart
Mark Burgess, The Hill Times

20 | The Long March to the Ballot Box 2015: Voter Fatigue or Enhanced
Engagement?

Fred Fletcher, York University

3. THE PLAYERS AND THEIR STRATEGIES
3.1 POLITICAL PARTIES
22 | The 2015 Election and the Canadian Party System
Richard Johnston, University of British Columbia

24 | La campagne du Bloc québécois : Quand on n'a rien à perdre...
Thierry Giasson, Université Laval

26 | The Conservative Campaign
Tom Flanagan, University of Calgary

28 | Greens by the Numbers
Susan Harada, Carleton University

30 | The Liberals’ Campaign for the Ages
Brooke Jeffrey, Concordia University

32 | The NDP’s “Government in Waiting” Strategy
David McGrane, St. Thomas More College, University of Saskatchewan

3.2 LEADERS, MINISTERS, AND THEIR STAFF
34 | Leading the Party Troops on a Long Campaign: How the Party Leaders Managed the Message
Cristine de Clercy, Western University

36 | Political Staff
R. Paul Wilson, Carleton University

38 | The Presidentialization of Executive Leadership in Canada
Jamie Gillies, St. Thomas University

40 | Ministerial (dis)Advantage in the 2015 Canadian Federal Election
Matthew Kerby, Australian National University

3.3 CANDIDATES AND LOCAL CAMPAIGNS
42 | Constituency Campaigning in the 2015 Federal Election
Royce Koop, University of Manitoba

44 | All Politics Is Not Local: Local Candidate Tweeting in the 2015 Election
Julie Killin, University of Calgary, and Tamara A. Small, University of Guelph

46 | Gender and Election 2015: Continuity with No Real Change
Melanee Thomas, University of Calgary

48 | LGBT Activism in the 2015 Federal Election
Joanna Everitt, University of New Brunswick-Saint John

50 | Visible Minority and Indigenous Members of Parliament
Erin Tolley, University of Toronto

3.4. THIRD PARTIES AND ORGANIZED INTERESTS
52 | Third Parties in the 2015 Federal Election: Partying like It’s 1988?
Andrea Lawlor, King’s University College, Western University, and
Erin Crandall, Acadia University

54 | Organized Interests Strike Back!
Rachel Laforest, Queen’s University

56 | Les syndicats en campagne contre Harper
Thomas Collombat, Université du Québec en Outaouais

58 | Public Servants, Political Activity, and “Harperman”
Jonathan Craft, University of Toronto

60 | All About Strong Alliances: First Nations Engagement in the Federal
Election

Pamela Palmater, Ryerson University

62 | Struggles and Opportunities for Issues Advocacy: The Case of the
Canadian Federation of Nurses Unions

Georgina Grosenick, Carleton University

4. THE MEDIA AND POLITICAL COMMUNICATION
64 | Mobile News: The 2015 Election via News Apps
Mary Francoli, Carleton University

66 | Thinking Outside the Box: TV News Broadcasting during the 2015 General Election
Jennifer Ditchburn, The Canadian Press

68 | Leaders’ Debates in a Post-Broadcast Democracy
Frédérick Bastien, Université de Montréal

70 | The “New Normal” of Mediatization and Narrowcasting
Shannon Sampert, Winnipeg Free Press, and Linda Trimble, University of Alberta

72 | Shopping for Votes: A Sequel?
Susan Delacourt, The Toronto Star

74 | Letting the Press Decide? Party Coverage, Media Tone, and Issue
Salience in the 2015 Canadian Federal Election Newsprint

Denver McNeney, McGill University

76 | The Political Science Professor and the Media
Anna Esselment, University of Waterloo

78 | The Party Leader’s Image and Brand Management: Party Branding
and Negative Ads in the 2015 Canadian Federal Election

Jeff MacLeod, Mount Saint Vincent University

80 | Fear and Loathing on the Campaign Trail: Political Advertising in the 2015 Election
Jonathan Rose, Queen’s University

82 | Trudeau as Celebrity Politician: Winning by More than a Hair
Patricia Cormack, St. Francis Xavier University, and Mireille Lalancette, Université du Québec à Trois-Rivières

84 | The Blog Is Dead, Long Live the (Micro)Blog! Unpacking Dynamics in Political Blogging during #elxn42
Vincent Raynauld, Emerson College

5. THE CAMPAIGN (NON)ISSUES
86 | Did Election 2015 Prove Kim Campbell Wrong?
Jennifer Robson, Carleton University

88 | Missing in Action: Disability Policy and Persons with Disabilities
Mario Levesque, Mount Allison University

90 | The Syrian Refugee Crisis and the Salience of International Issues
Sean Fleming, University of Cambridge

92 | We've Got Some Catching Up to Do: The Public Service and the 2015 Federal Election
Amanda Clarke, Carleton University

94 | Constitutional Issues in the 2015 Federal Election
Thomas M.J. Bateman, St. Thomas University, and Andrea Lawlor, King’s University College, Western University

96 | Election 2015 and Canada’s Public Services
Bryan Evans, Ryerson University

6. THE PROVINCES AND REGIONALISM
98 | Regional Sensibilities and Regional Voting
Nelson Wiseman, University of Toronto

100 | Le NPD au Québec : doublé sur sa gauche
Eric Montigny et François Gélineau, Université Laval

102 | Provincial Premiers and the 2015 Federal Election Campaign
J.P. Lewis, University of New Brunswick

104 | All Politics is Local: The Campaign to Put Urban Issues on the
Election Agenda

Angelia Wagner, McGill University

7. PUBLIC OPINION POLLS AND VOTER BEHAVIOUR
106 | Horserace Journalism under Stress?
J. Scott Matthews, Memorial University

108 | Canadian Pollsters and the 2015 Canadian Election: Did They Get It Right?
Christopher Adams, University of Manitoba

110 | Better Together? Poll Aggregation and Canadian Election Forecasting
Gregory Eady and Clifton van der Linden, Vox Pop Labs

114 | Digital Technology and Civic Engagement: The Case of Vote Compass
Yannick Dufresne and Clifton van der Linden, Vox Pop Labs

116 | Change above All Else: The Public Opinion Dynamics That Led to the Liberal Majority
David Coletto and Maciej Czop, Abacus Data

118 | The Youth Vote in the 2015 Election
Allison Harell and Tania Gosselin, Université du Québec à Montréal

8. LOOKING AHEAD
120 | A Branding (and Rebranding) Reality
Alex Marland, Memorial University

 


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