Birds of British Columbia, Volume 4
744 pages, 9 1/2 x 12
Over 700 full-colour illustrations and 150 maps
Release Date:23 Feb 2001
Release Date:01 Nov 2007

Birds of British Columbia, Volume 4

Wood Warblers through Old World Sparrows

UBC Press

This much-awaited final volume of The Birds of British Columbia completes what some have called one of the most important regional ornithological works in North America. It is the culmination of more than 25 years of effort by the authors who, with the assistance of thousands of dedicated volunteers throughout the province, have created the basic reference work on the avifauna of British Columbia.

Volume 4 covers the last half of the passerines and describes 102 species, including the warblers, sparrows, grosbeaks, blackbirds, and finches. The text builds upon the authoritative format of the previous volumes and is supported by hundreds of full-colour illustrations, including detailed distribution maps, unique habitat shots, and beautiful photographs of the birds, their nests, eggs, and young. In addition, a species update lists and describes 27 species of birds new to the province since the first three volumes were published. The book concludes with Synopsis: The Birds of British Columbia into the 21st Century, which synthesizes data and information from all four volumes and looks at the conservation challenges facing birds in the new millennium.

The four volumes in The Birds of British Columbia provide unprecedented coverage of the region’s birds, presenting a wealth of information on the ornithological history, regional environment, habitat, breeding habits, migratory movements, seasonality and distribution patterns of 472 species of birds. It is the complete reference work for birdwatchers, ornithologists and naturalists.


  • 2002, Short-listed - BC Book Prize, Roderick Haig-Brown Regional, Province of British Columbia

R. Wayne Campbell was a senior research scientist (retired) and is the British Columbia Wildlife Branch Director at the WBT Wildlife Data Centre, Wild Bird Trust of British Columbia. Neil K. Dawe is a senior wildlife technician at the Canadian Wildlife Service. Ian McTaggart-Cowan is a dean emeritus (Graduate Studies) at the University of British Columbia. John M. Cooper is a wildlife biologist at Manning, Cooper and Associates. Gary W. Kaiser was a marine bird ecologist (retired) for the Canadian Wildlife Service. Andrew C. Stewart is a wildlife habitat specialist for the British Columbia Resources Inventory Branch. Michael C.E. McNall is the ornithology collections manager at the Royal British Columbia Museum.



Checklist of British Columbia Birds

Passerines: Wood-Warblers through Old World Sparrows

Regular Species

Parulidae: Wood-Warblers

Thraupidae: Tanagers

Emberizidae: Towhees, Sparrows, Longspurs, and Allies

Cardinalidae: Cardinals, Grosbeaks, and Allies

Icteridae: Blackbirds, Orioles, and Allies

Fringillidae: Cardueline Finches and Allies

Passeridae: Old World Sparrows

Casual, Accidental, Extirpated and Extinct Species

Changes in Status of the Avifauna of British Columbia, 1987 through 1999

Conclusion: The Birds of British Columbia in the Twenty-First Century

Avifaunal Biodiversity, Ecological Distribution and Patterns of Change

What Lies in Store for the Birds of British Columbia? New Philosophies, New

Concerns, and the New Conservation Challenge

Their Diversity, Their Significance, and Their Future


1 Migration Chronology

2 Summary of Christmas Bird Counts in British Columbia, 1957 through 1993

3 Summary of Breeding Bird Surveys in British Columbia, 1968 through 1994

4 Contributors

5 Checklist of the Birds of British Columbia

References Cited


Contributing Authors

About the Authors

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