Comics Culture

Showing 1-6 of 6 items.

EC Comics

Race, Shock, and Social Protest

Rutgers University Press

EC Comics recounts how, in the 1950s, EC published many sensationally-titled comics with serious, socially progressive themes—such as “Hate!,” “The Guilty!,” and “Judgment Day!”—and explores how they grappled with the civil rights struggle, anticommunist hysteria, and other forms of prejudice in America.

More info...

Twelve-Cent Archie

New edition with full color illustrations

Rutgers University Press

For over seventy-five years, Archie and the gang at Riverdale High have been America’s most iconic teenagers. Yet they have been relatively ignored by scholars—until now. Twelve-Cent Archie is both the first academic study of these comics and an innovative creative work in its own right. In a hundred short chapters, renowned comics scholar Bart Beaty takes us on a witty, eclectic tour of the Archie universe, addressing everything from the history of the American teenager to the mystery of Jughead’s hat.

More info...

Wonder Woman

New edition with full color illustrations

Rutgers University Press

William Marston was an unusual man—a psychologist, a soft-porn pulp novelist, more than a bit of a carny, and the (self-declared) inventor of the lie detector. He was also the creator of Wonder Woman, the comic where he expressed two of his greatest passions: feminism and women in bondage. Noah Berlatsky takes us on a wild ride through the Wonder Woman comics of the 1940s, showing how Marston and illustrator Harry Peter came together to create a fictional universe that celebrated female empowerment and queer sexualities.

More info...

Considering Watchmen: Poetics, Property, Politics

New edition with full color illustrations

Rutgers University Press

In this groundbreaking new study, Andrew Hoberek examines Alan Moore and Dave Gibbons’s landmark comic book series Watchmen from a variety of angles: as an artistic achievement, as a political statement, and as a self-conscious piece of intellectual property. He not only provides a historical context for appreciating how innovative Watchmen was in the 1980s, but also demonstrates the continued influence it has exerted on both comics and literature as a whole.

More info...

Superman

The Persistence of an American Icon

Rutgers University Press

Superman is an icon of the American Way. Examining his many appearances over eighty years in comics, films, television series, and other media, Ian Gordon explores the dynamic process of mythmaking surrounding the character. Digging into comics archives, he reveals the prominent roles fans and collectors have played in remembering, interpreting, and reimagining Superman’s iconography.

More info...

Frank Miller's Daredevil and the Ends of Heroism

Rutgers University Press

In the late 1970s and early 1980s, writer-artist Frank Miller turned Daredevil from a tepid-selling comic to an industry-wide success story, then left to establish a renowned and controversial career. A childhood fan of the comic, media scholar Paul Young presents a rigorous study of the artist’s influences and innovations, an examination of how Miller’s vision impacted the comics industry, and a reflection on how Daredevil taught him about the creative possibilities of comics while shaking his faith in superheroes.

More info...
Free Shipping   Blue
Find what you’re looking for...
Stay Informed

Receive the latest UBC Press news, including events, catalogues, and announcements.


Read past newsletters
Current Catalogue
Fall 2019 Canadian Cover
Publishers Represented
UBC Press is the Canadian agent for several international publishers. Visit our Publishers Represented page to learn more.