Critical Issues in Indigenous Studies

Showing 1-6 of 9 items.

Girl of New Zealand

Colonial Optics in Aotearoa

The University of Arizona Press

 Girl of New Zealand resurrects Maori women from objectification and locates them firmly within Maori whanau/families and communities.

 

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Divided Peoples

Policy, Activism, and Indigenous Identities on the U.S.-Mexico Border

The University of Arizona Press

Divided Peoples addresses the impact border policies have on traditional lands and the peoples who live there—whether environmental degradation, border patrol harassment, or the disruption of traditional ceremonies. Anthropologist Christina Leza shows how such policies affect the traditional cultural survival of Indigenous peoples along the border. The author examines local interpretations and uses of international rights tools by Native activists, counter-discourse on the U.S.-Mexico border, and challenges faced by Indigenous border activists when communicating their issues to a broader public.

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Spiral to the Stars

Mvskoke Tools of Futurity

The University of Arizona Press

Spiral to the Stars offers a critical and concrete map for community making that leverages Mvskoke way-finding tools of energy, kinship, knowledge, power, and spaces. It is must-have book for community organizers, radical pedagogists, and anyone wishing to empower and advocate for their community.

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Finding Meaning

Kaona and Contemporary Hawaiian Literature

The University of Arizona Press

Winner of the Native American Literature Symposium’s Beatrice Medicine Award for Published Monograph.

The first extensive study of contemporary Hawaiian literature, Finding Meaning examines kaona, the practice of hiding and finding meaning, for its profound connectivity. Through kaona, author Brandy Nalani McDougall affirms the tremendous power of Indigenous stories and genealogies to give lasting meaning to decolonization movements.

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Staking Claim

Settler Colonialism and Racialization in Hawai'i

The University of Arizona Press

Staking Claim analyzes Hawai‘i at the crossroads of competing claims for identity, belonging, and political status. Judy Rohrer argues that the dual settler colonial processes of racializing native Hawaiians (erasing their indigeneity), and indigenizing non-Hawaiians, enable the staking of non-Hawaiian claims to Hawai‘i.

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Navajo Sovereignty

Understandings and Visions of the Diné People

Edited by Lloyd L. Lee; Foreword by Jennifer Nez Denetdale
The University of Arizona Press

A companion to Diné Perspectives: Revitalizing and Reclaiming Navajo Thought, each chapter of Navajo Sovereignty offers the contributors’ individual perspectives. This book discusses Western law’s view of Diné sovereignty, research, activism, creativity, and community, and Navajo sovereignty in traditional education. Above all, Lloyd L. Lee and the contributing scholars and community members call for the rethinking of Navajo sovereignty in a way more rooted in Navajo beliefs, culture, and values.

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