Exploring Experiences of Advocacy by People with Learning Disabilities
224 pages, 5 1/5 x 9 2/5
Paperback
Release Date:15 May 2006
ISBN:9781843103592
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Exploring Experiences of Advocacy by People with Learning Disabilities

Testimonies of Resistance

Jessica Kingsley Publishers
'This book provides a fascinating vignette of the personal experiences of People with Learning Disabilities for the better (or worse) part of the last century.What makes the book so interesting is actually meeting some of those involved and seeing their stories in print. It flags up what has been achieved so far, and what still needs to be done.'- Oral History'The editors of this book, written by a range of authors form the UK and overseas, set out to provide the reader with an understanding of the ways in which people with learning disabilities direct their lives through advocacy. Its strength lies in the way in which it puts to the forefront the voices of those who have been, and still might be, excluded from society if it were not for the different forms of resistance they have engaged in.'- Professional Social Work'The accounts are all of acts of resistance and survival, many of them told by the people themselves. This creates another fascinating book which contributes greatly to an appreciation of the role of people with learning difficulties themselves in the historical struggle for better treatment in society.'- CommunityLiving'This book explains how people with learning disabilities have become increasingly able to direct their own lives as fully active members of their communities. It also explains what self-advocacy means for these people and it shows how opportunities and services have changed for them in 10 years.'- Europe for Us!'Heartbreaking, touching and at times inspirational, this book introduces us to the people who have been oppressed, the system that oppressed them and the individuals who stood up to themRead this if you are involved in supporting people and you will find yourself addressing your practice and attitudes and ultimately, improving the quality of care you deliver.'- Community Care'The accounts are all of acts of resistance and survival, many of them told by the people themselves. This creates another fascinating book which contributes greatly to an appreciation of the role of people with learning difficulties themselves in the historical struggle for better treatment in society.' - Community LivingExploring Experiences of Advocacy by People with Learning Disabilities charts the course through which people with learning disabilities have become increasingly able to direct their own lives as fully active members of their communities.Accounts from the UK, Australia, Canada and Iceland consider both the individual pioneers of self advocacy and local and national groups that have been set up to work actively towards improved services for people with learning disabilities. The book also examines what self-advocacy means for these people and provides an overview of how opportunities and services have changed for them over the decades.Many of the personal accounts, photographs and songs included in this book will be accessible and encouraging to people with learning disabilities, and they will provide inspiring reading for professionals who work with them, family members and community and government service providers.
RELATED TOPICS: Educational Policy & Theory
Duncan Mitchell is Professor of Health and Disability at Manchester Metropolitan University and Head of Clinical Services for Manchester Learning Disability Partnership. Rannveig Traustadottir is Associate Professor in the Faculty of Social Science at the University of Iceland, Reykjavik. She is active in national and international disability associations and is the President of the Nordic Network on Disability Research. Rohhss Chapman is a development worker for Cumbria People First, and is studying for a PhD on self advocacy and people with learning disabilities at The Open University, UK. She is also a member of the Social History of Learning Disabilities Group. Louise Townson is Project Director for Carlisle People First, and is a member of the UK Government task force on Valuing People. Nigel Ingham has, during the past 25 years, developed inter-agency reminiscence and oral history projects in North West England and South East Scotland while working in adult education and the voluntary sector. Currently he is working for Community Service Volunteers (CSV), managing a Heritage Lottery-funded project archiving the residential and working culture of the Royal Albert Hospital, Lancaster, a former large Victorian long-stay institution for people with learning difficulties.Sue Ledger is a service manager with an inner London borough and has worked alongside people with learning difficulties in developing a range of support services in the UK and with two overseas projects.
1. Introduction, Duncan Mitchell, Manchester Metropolitan University, UK.Part I: Personal Accounts of Advocacy and Resistance. 2. Advocacy as Resistance: Speaking Up as a Way of Fighting Back, Dorothy Atkinson, The Open University, UK, Mabel Cooper and Gloria Ferris, London Consultative Group, UK. 3. Restriction and Resistance: The Experience of Life on a Locked Ward for People with Learning Disabilities, Katherine Owen, The Open University, UK. 4. `I Would Never Walk, Talk, Sit or Stand!' The Girl on the Tricycle, Marjorie Chappell, independent writer and speaker, with Duncan Mitchell. 5. Two Pioneers of Self-advocacy: Ray Loomis and Tom Houlihan, Paul Williams, University of Reading, UK. 6. `I've Had Enough of the Everyday Thing': Karen Spencer's Life Story, Karen Spencer, Central England People First, UK, with Jan Walmsley, The Open University, UK. 7. Resilience and Resistance in the Life Histories of Three Women with Learning Difficulties in Iceland, Gudrun Stefansdottir, Iceland University of Education, and Rannveig Traustadottir, University of Iceland, Reykjavik,Iceland. 8. Songs of Resistance, Sue Ledger and Lindy Shufflebotham, tbc. Part II: Speaking for Ourselves: Accounts of Self-advocacy in Action. 9. My Life, My Choices, Paul Savage, Tina Wilkinson and Carl Worth, Speaking Up for Action. 10. `What They Want - Yes, But What We Want - Bugger Us!', Andy Docherty, Elizabeth Harkness, Malcolm Eardley and Louise Townson, Carlisle People First, UK, and Rohhss Chapman, The Open University, UK. 11. The Life of a Group and a Personal Story: Experiences from Huddersfield People First, Jeremy Hoy, Huddersfield People First, UK, Dries Cautrels and Dan Goodley, University of Sheffield, UK. Part III: Alliances with Others. 12. Fires Burning: Advocacy, Camping and Children with Learning Disabilities in Ontario, 1950-1990, Jessa Chupik, McMaster University, Ontario, Canada. 13. Resistance in Mencap's History, Liz Tilley, The Open University, UK. 14. One Man's Dream that Continues to Inspire Others, Heather Cadbury, Teddington Area Reminiscence Group, UK. 15. Maureen Oswin and the `Forgotten Children' of the Long-stay Wards: Research as Resistance, Sheena Rolph and Dorothy Atkinson, The Open University, UK. 16. Tales from the Burdens, Peter Carpenter, Bath and North East Somerset Primary Care Trust, UK. 17. Taking a Stand Against the Odds, Kelley Johnson, RMIT University, Melbourne, Australia. Part IV: Alternative Interpretations: Reflections on Resistance. 18. Assistance and Resistance: Making Sense of Inter-war Caring Strategies, Pamela Dale, University of Exeter, UK. 19. Stereotyped Behaviour: Resistance by People with Profound Learning Disabilities, Melanie Nind, University of Southampton, UK. 20. Conclusion, Duncan Mitchell. The Contributors. Subject Index. Author Index.
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