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New and Recent in History
Reflections on Settler Colonialism in Canada

In this beautifully crafted and written volume, Canada’s preeminent historical geographer traces how Canada’s geographical limitations have shaped the nature of its settler societies – from first contacts, to dispossession, to our current age of reconciliation.

Photography and the Nuclear Era in Canada

The Bomb in the Wilderness is an acutely perceptive analysis of Canada’s nuclear footprint through the medium of photography, revealing how we have represented, interpreted, and remembered nuclear activities since 1945.

Histories of Canada in the Atomic Age

The Nuclear North investigates Canada’s place in the grey area between nuclear and non-nuclear to explore how this has shaped Canadians’ understanding of their country and its policies.

Visual Culture at the Banff School of Fine Arts

The first major historical study of the Banff School of Fine Arts, Uplift reveals the foundational role of the school in shaping what is today the globally renowned Banff Centre for Arts and Creativity.

Imagining a New "We"

Transforming the Canadian History Classroom is a call for a radically innovative practice that places students – the stories they carry and the histories they want to be part of – at the centre of history education.

An Ojibway-Anishinabe Vision for the Future

Reframing Manitou Aki (Creator's Land) history from the perspective of the Ojibway-Anishinabe, Our Hearts Are as One Fire shares a vision for the leaders of today and tomorrow.

The Untold Story of the Métis of Western Québec

Bois-Brûlés shatters the prevailing orthodoxy that Métis communities are found solely in western Canada by demonstrating that a distinct community emerged in the fur trade frontier of Quebec in the early nineteenth century and persists to this day.

James Teit and an Anthropology of Belonging

At the Bridge lifts from obscurity the story of James Teit (1864–1922), an outstanding Canadian ethnographer and Indian rights activist whose thoughtful scholarship and tireless organizing have been largely ignored.

Voyaging to the Icy Latitudes

This first modern study to focus on James Cook’s polar adventures, Captain Cook Rediscovered introduces an entirely new explorer who is more at home along the edge of the polar ice packs than the Pacific’s sandy beaches.

A Colonial Inheritance Saga

This extraordinary book skillfully blends diverse historical evidence to tell the harrowing story of Caroline Kearney and her struggles against the paternalistic inheritance laws of the nineteenth century colonial world.

Beauty Contests and Settler Femininity

Queen of the Maple Leaf reveals the role of beauty pageants in entrenching settler femininity and white heteropatriarchy at the heart of twentieth-century Canada.

Women and the Vote in British Columbia

The first book on the woman’s suffrage movement in British Columbia, A Great Revolutionary Wave traces the history of the fight for the vote from the 1870s to the 1940s against a backdrop of social reform, international social movements, labour politics, and settler colonialism.

Women and the Vote in the Prairie Provinces

This long-overdue account of the suffrage campaigns in the first region to grant women the vote in Canada shatters cherished myths about how the West was won.

Women and the Vote in Quebec

To Be Equals in Our Own Country chronicles the bitter struggle for women’s suffrage in Quebec, the last province to grant Canadian women this fundamental human right.

Women and Girls of Canada and Newfoundland during the Second World War

Making the Best of It examines the ways in which gender and other identities intersected to shape the experiences of female Canadians and Newfoundlanders during the Second World War.

Charting Colonial Trajectories

Unmooring the Komagata Maru challenges conventional historical accounts to consider the national and transnational colonial dimensions of the Komagata Maru incident.

Youth Culture, the New Left, and the Reimagining of Acadia

In the Spirit of ’68 tells the story of how a unique blend of local circumstance and global influence transformed Acadian New Brunswick’s youth culture, spawning one of the most influential revolutionary student movements in Canada.

The Origins and Legacies of the 1969 Omnibus Bill

No Place for the State is an incisive study that offers complex and often contrasting perspectives on the Trudeau government’s 1969 Omnibus Bill and its impact on sexual and moral politics in Canada.

The Roots and Routes of Canadian Reggae

This insider look at the forces that came together to make Canada’s reggae scene reaffirms the power of music to combat racism and build bridges between communities and cultures.

White Appropriations of Black Masculinities in the Civil Rights Era

Offering fresh insights and raising important questions, this historical exploration of appropriation traces the ways in which gender and race were negotiated through the popular culture of the Civil Rights Era.

A Political and Diplomatic History

This intriguing study sheds light on Canada’s relationship with Ireland, revealing the origins, trials, and successes of the intimate and at times turbulent connection between the two countries.

Canada and East Timor, 1975–99

Challenge the Strong Wind recounts the story of Canadian policy toward East Timor from the 1975 invasion to the 1999 vote for independence, demonstrating that historical accounts need to include both government and non-governmental perspectives.

Religion and National Identity in Québec

Wide-ranging and theoretically sophisticated, Moments of Crisis offers a groundbreaking explanation for why religion continues to be implicated in national identity crises in Québec.

Marcel Cadieux and Canadian Diplomacy

The Good Fight is the insightful and entertaining biography of arguably the most important francophone diplomat and civil servant in Canadian history.

Henri Bourassa and the First World War

This revisionist account of Henri Bourassa’s writings and times reshapes our understanding of why Quebec diverged from the rest of Canada when it came to war.

A Nation Shaped by War

With compelling insight, Canada 1919 exposes the ways in which the First World War shaped and changed Canada – and the ways it did not.

Munitions Disposal and Postwar Reconstruction in Canada

War Junk recounts the surprising history of leftover military munitions and supplies, revealing their complex political, economic, social, and environmental legacies in postwar Canada.

The Evolution of a Combat Arm, 1920–2012

Canada’s Mechanized Infantry examines the challenges facing the Canadian Army as it transformed its infantry from First World War foot soldiers to a twenty-first–century combat force integrating soldiers, vehicles, weapons, and electronics.

Voluntary Mobilization in Australia, Canada, and New Zealand during the First World War

For Home and Empire compares home-front mobilization during the First World War in three British dominions, using a settler colonial framework to show that voluntary efforts strengthened communal bonds while reinforcing class, race, and gender boundaries.

A Small Power on a Large Stage

This is the definitive history of the Canadian experience, both its successes and failures, on the world’s largest stage – the United Nations Security Council.

Crises in the History of a Profession

The first historical study of morality and science in Canadian medicine, Medicine and Morality shows how moments of doubt in doctors’ impartiality resulted in changes to how medicine was done, and even to the very definition of medical practice itself.

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