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Women and the Vote in Quebec

To Be Equals in Our Own Country chronicles the bitter struggle for women’s suffrage in Quebec, the last province to grant Canadian women this fundamental human right.

This is the remarkable story, told by a key insider, about Vancouver’s dramatic transformation from a typical mid-sized North American city into an inspiring world-class metropolis celebrated for its liveability, sustainability, and vibrancy.

Women and the Vote in the Prairie Provinces

This long-overdue account of the suffrage campaigns in the first region to grant women the vote in Canada shatters cherished myths about how the West was won.

These captivating reflections on the history of our environment and ourselves will make you think differently not only about Canada’s past but also about our future.

Charting Colonial Trajectories

Unmooring the Komagata Maru challenges conventional historical accounts to consider the national and transnational colonial dimensions of the Komagata Maru incident.

British Family Correspondence and the Settler Colonial Everyday in British Columbia

The first substantial study of family correspondence and settler colonialism, Nothing to Write Home About elucidates the significance of trans-imperial intimacy, epistolary silence, and the everyday in laying the foundations of settler colonialism in British Columbia.

The British 62nd and Canadian 4th Divisions in Battle

Focusing on developments at the divisional level in Britain and Canada, The Empire on the Western Front casts a critical eye on how the British Empire transformed unseasoned volunteers into battle-ready soldiers for the Western Front.

Forced Relocation and Making a Good Life in Postwar Canada

Through five diverse episodes of forced relocation across Canada, Moved by the State offers a new look at the power of the welfare state and the political culture of postwar Canada.

Canada, Britain, and Global Conflict, 1867–1947

This insightful collection untangles the paradox of mobilizing a Canadian contribution to Britain’s imperial wars – and forging a national identity in the process.

Stories of Incarceration and Resistance from Canada’s Most Notorious Prison

Filled with stories of pain, regret, and resistance, this chilling account of how four women survived their time at Kingston Penitentiary stands as an indictment of the idea that prisons and punishment are society’s answer to crime.

Moderation, Modernization, and Political Marketing

The New NDP traces the tumultuous shift in federal New Democratic Party’s ideology and campaigning techniques in the opening decades of the twenty-first century.

The St. Catherine’s Case and Aboriginal Title

This illuminating account of the St. Catherine’s case of the 1880s reveals the erroneous assumptions and racism inherent in judgments that would define the nature and character of Aboriginal title in Canadian law and policy for almost a century.

The Life and Times of Laura Marshall Jamieson

The Last Suffragist Standing is an unprecedented study of a pioneering Canadian suffragist and politician and an illuminating work on the history of feminism, socialism, internationalism, and activism in Canada.

James Teit and an Anthropology of Belonging

At the Bridge lifts from obscurity the story of James Teit (1864–1922), an outstanding Canadian ethnographer and Indian rights activist whose thoughtful scholarship and tireless organizing have been largely ignored.

Transboundary Resource Management in the Lake of the Woods Watershed

It’s one thing to live in a watershed. We all do. It’s another to manage one, as Levelling the Lake compellingly demonstrates.

Women and the Vote in Ontario

Our Voices Must Be Heard examines the ideals and failings of Ontario’s suffrage history, its daring supporters and thunderous enemies, and its blind spots on matters of race and class.

Canadian Foreign Relations in the Diefenbaker Era

By uncovering new sources of research and applying innovative analysis, Reassessing the Rogue Tory challenges standard interpretations of Canadian foreign policy during the controversial Diefenbaker years.

Public Policy and Structural Development, 1960–2015

Postsecondary Education in British Columbia is a thoughtful critical analysis of the role of social justice, human capital, and the market in the development of institutions and public policy in BC education since 1960.

Bringing together the world’s leading scholars on the subject, Military Education and the British Empire explores distinct national narratives within a comparative context to expose the role of military education in maintaining empire.

Vancouver’s Iconic Jazz Club and the Canadian Co-operative Jazz Scene in the 1950s and ‘60s
By Marian Jago Foreword by Don Thompson

Live at the Cellar tells the story of Vancouver’s iconic jazz club and other co-operative scenes during the 1950s and ’60s and the profound influence they had on the evolution of jazz in Canada.

Science and Technology in Canadian History

The first major collection of its kind in thirty years, Made Modern explores the role of science and technology in shaping Canadians’ experience of themselves and their place in the modern world.

Donald Marshall Jr. and the Mi’kmaw Quest for Justice

A passionate account of how one man’s fight against racism and injustice transformed the criminal justice system and galvanized the Mi’kmaw Nation’s struggle for self-determination, forever changing the landscape of Indigenous rights in Canada and around the world.

Indigenous Politics, Gender, and the Union of BC Indian Chiefs

Assembling Unity traces the history of pan-Indigenous unity in British Columbia through political negotiations, gendered activism, and the balance and exercise of power.

The Japanese in Changchun, 1905–45

While other studies focus on the role of diplomats and the military, Constructing Empire demonstrates that building the Japanese empire also required civilian participation.

A Reappraisal

This first major comprehensive study of Yuan Shikai in more than half a century explores the controversial life of one of the most important figures in China’s transition from empire to republic.

A History of an International Feminist Movement, 1972–77
By Louise Toupin Translated by Käthe Roth

This is the first-ever international history of the divisive and influential feminist movement, Wages for Housework.

Canada and the International Bill of Rights, 1947–76

Resisting Rights challenges the myth that Canada has been at the forefront in the development of international human rights law and led the cause at the United Nations.

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