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From the Landmark Cases in Canadian Law Series
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Judicial Appointments, Marc Nadon, and the Supreme Court Act Reference

The Tenth Justice tells the complete story of one of the strangest sagas in Canadian legal history: the ill-fated appointment to the Supreme Court of Canada of Justice Marc Nadon.

The Guerin Case and Aboriginal Law

This thoughtful and engaging examination of the Guerin case shows how it changed the relationship between governments and Indigenous peoples from one of wardship to one based on legal rights.

Hunter v Southam and the Drift from Reasonable Search Protections

This book, the second in the Landmark Cases in Canadian Law series, argues that in subsequent, post-Hunter v Southam decisions, the Supreme Court of Canada has strayed from the principles set out in that case, which were intended to protect the privacy of citizens from encroaching state power.

The St. Catherine’s Case and Aboriginal Title

This illuminating account of the St. Catherine’s case of the 1880s reveals the erroneous assumptions and racism inherent in judgments that would define the nature and character of Aboriginal title in Canadian law and policy for almost a century.

New and Recent in Law
The Cost and Value of Accessing Law

Based on innovative recent empirical research, The Justice Crisis assesses what is and isn’t working in efforts to improve access to civil and family justice in Canada.

Community Programs for Criminalized Women

Do community programs offer an effective alternative to imprisonment for women within the criminal justice system? A Better Justice? sets out the case.

Stories of Incarceration and Resistance from Canada’s Most Notorious Prison

Filled with stories of pain, regret, and resistance, this chilling account of how four women survived their time at Kingston Penitentiary stands as an indictment of the idea that prisons and punishment are society’s answer to crime.

Youth with Autism and the Juvenile Justice Systems in Canada and the United States

Through a comparison of juvenile justice systems in Canada and the United States, Law and Neurodiversity examines gaps of accommodation and consideration for youth with autism.

Financial Pressures, Emotional Labour, and Canadian Bankruptcy Law

Trustees at Work explores what is means to be considered a deserving debtor in under contemporary Canadian personal bankruptcy law.

Anonymous Judgments at the Supreme Court of Canada

By the Court is the first major study of unanimous and anonymous legal decisions: the unique “By the Court” format used by the Supreme Court of Canada.

The Political Economy of Indigenous Land Reform

Inalienable Properties explores the contrasting approaches taken by local leaders to property rights and development in four Indigenous communities.

Men, Masculinity, and the Indian Act reverses conventional thinking to argue that the sexism directed at women within the act in fact undermines the well-being of all Indigenous people, proposing that Indigenous nationhood cannot be realized or reinvigorated until this broader injustice is understood.

Illegalized Mexican Migrants in Canada

North of El Norte examines the policies, practices, and barriers that affect the daily lives of Mexican migrants with precarious status in Canada.

Sanctuary and Security in Canada and the United States

The first major study to compare changes made to Canadian and US refugee law after and because of 9/11, Refugee Law after 9/11 uncovers crucial connections among refugee law, security relativism, and national self-image.

Canada’s Refugee Resettlement Program

Crossing Law’s Border offers a comprehensive account of Canada’s refugee resettlement program, from the Indochinese crisis of the 1970s to the current era of controversy and flux in refugee and asylum policy.

The Origins and Legacies of the 1969 Omnibus Bill

No Place for the State is an incisive study that offers complex and often contrasting perspectives on the Trudeau government’s 1969 Omnibus Bill and its impact on sexual and moral politics in Canada.

Fortune-Telling, Spirituality, and the Law

Faith or Fraud: Fortune-Telling, Individual Spirituality, and the Law answers an emerging controversy: Should the law’s understanding of religion include the “spiritual but not religious”?

This accessible but theoretically sophisticated volume reveals how neoliberalism – as both an economic project and a broader political approach – has come to govern our daily lives, our understanding of the world we live in, and even how we think about ourselves.

International Norms and Chinese Perspectives

Good Governance in Economic Development examines what happens at the intersection of international and Chinese conceptions of transparency, accountability, and public participation.

This book demonstrates why economic development is synonymous with institutional development for the furthering of human development issues.

Law Titles from our Publishing Partners
A Legal Rights Guide for Canadian Children and Teens

A practical guide to the law as it pertains to the young people of Canada.

There is powerful evidence that the colonization of Indigenous people was and is a crime, and that that crime is on-going.  In this book Nielsen and Robyn present an analysis of the relationship between these colonial crimes and their continuing criminal and socially injurious consequences that exist today.

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