Network Sovereignty
192 pages, 5 1/5 x 9 2/5
2 illus., 9 charts
Paperback
Release Date:01 Jul 2017
ISBN:9780295741826
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Network Sovereignty

Building the Internet across Indian Country

University of Washington Press

In 2012, the United Nations General Assembly determined that affordable Internet access is a human right, critical to citizen participation in democratic governments. Given the significance of information and communication technologies (ICTs) to social and political life, many U.S. tribes and Native organizations have created their own projects, from streaming radio to building networks to telecommunications advocacy. In Network Sovereignty, Marisa Duarte examines these ICT projects to explore the significance of information flows and information systems to Native sovereignty, and toward self-governance, self-determination, and decolonization.

By reframing how tribes and Native organizations harness these technologies as a means to overcome colonial disconnections, Network Sovereignty shifts the discussion of information and communication technologies in Native communities from one of exploitation to one of Indigenous possibility.

In Network Sovereignty, Duarte looks at the psychological and philosophical implications of the colonization of Indigenous peoples in a technological age. She provides accessible and relevant examples of American Indians searching for ways to use new technologies to address very real social, cultural, and political challenges. Ken Coates, author of #IdleNoMore: and the Remaking of Canada
Duarte shows that tribal ownership and use of information and communication technologies has the potential to deepen the meaning and experience of tribal sovereignty, serving as a means to undermine colonialism. Andrew Needham, author of Power Lines: Phoenix and the Making of the Modern Southwest

Marisa Elena Duarte is assistant professor of justice and sociotechnical change with the School of Social Transformation at Arizona State University.

Introduction
1. Network Thinking
2. Reframing ICTs in Indian Country
3. The Overlap between Technology and Sovereignty
4. Sociotechnical Landscapes
5. Internet for Self-Determination
6. Network Sovereignty
7. Decolonizing the Technological
Conclusion
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