Residential Child Care
248 pages, 6 x 9
Paperback
Release Date:15 Sep 2007
ISBN:9781843105268
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Residential Child Care draws on the latest research to offer guidance for developing best practice, policy and improved outcomes for children and young people.Contributors examine important aspects of residential care work, and address the concerns about the poor outcomes for young people leaving care and the role of residential child care as a positive choice within the range of care services. Key issues addressed include promoting well-being and development for young people; tackling potential discrimination in residential policy and practice; responding to areas of discord in residential child care; and underpinning themes relating to residential child care, such as staff development and support.This book will provide essential reading for policy makers, managers and practitioners in residential care and the social services, and students in the field.

'Contributions examine a number of recurring themes and pay particular attention to the importance of the relationship between young people and residential staff members. This book is an essential addition to the literature on residential child care.'- ChildRight'This is a refreshingly readable book which looks at both research findings and practical ways of working to improve the care of young people in residential settings. The book is divided into four sections with wide-ranging contributions on promoting well-being and development, addressing discrimination, conflict and response, and context and culture... This is a book students, residential staff and managers should all find useful, with extensive references for following-up specific issues in more detail. I would highly recommended it for all those learning about, working in, or managing residential services for young people.'- Social Work'White academically sound, the book is also very readable and has a useful index that helps you to find the material you are looking for.'- Cafcass'This book draws on the latest research to offer guidance for developing best practice, policy and improved outcomes for children and young people. Contributors examine important aspects of residential care work and address the concerns about poor outcomes for young people leaving care, and the role of residential child care as a positive choice within the range of care services. Issues addressed include promoting well-being and development for young people; tackling potential discrimination in residential policy and practice, responding to areas of discord in residential child care; and underpinning themes relating to residential child care, such as child development and support.'- Human Givens
Andrew Kendrick is Professor of Residential Child Care at Strathclyde University, Scotland. He co-ordinates the research programme of the Scottish Institute for Residential Child Care and is Head of the Glasgow School of Social Work. He is a member of the Executive Committee of EUSARF (European Scientific Association for Residential and Foster Care for Children and Adolescents), a member of the editorial board of International Journal of Child and Family Welfare and Child & Youth Care Forum, and editor of the Scottish Journal of Residential Child Care.
1. Introduction: Residential Child Care. Andrew Kendrick, Universities of Strathclyde and Glasgow. Promoting Well-being and Development 2. Could Do Better! Supporting the Education of Looked After Children. Joe Francis, University of Edinburgh.3. The Health of Looked After Children in Residential Care. Jane Scott, University of Dundee; Harriet Ward, University of Loughborough; and Malcolm Hill, University of Strathclyde. 4. Mental Health and Children and Young People in Residential Care. Michael van Beinum, NHS Lanarkshire and University of Glasgow. 5. The Concept of Resilience: Messages for Residential Child Care. Brigid Daniel, University of Dundee. 6. Young People Leaving Residential Care: Experiences and Outcomes. Jo Dixon, University of York. Addressing Issues of Discrimination 7. Gender Matters in Residential Child Care. Teresa O'Neill, University of Bristol. 8. Disabled Children in Residential Settings. Kirsten Stalker, University of Strathclyde. 9. Black and Minority Ethnic Children and Young People in Residential Care. Andrew Kendrick, Universities of Strathclyde and Glasgow. Conflict and Response. 10. Prioritising Young People's Concerns in Residential Care: Responding to Peer Violence. Christine Barter, University of Bristol. 11. Hold On: Physical Restraint in Residential Child Care. Laura Steckley and Andrew Kendrick, Universities of Strathclyde and Glasgow. 12. Blurring the Boundaries: The Relationship between Secure Accomodation and `Alternatives' in Scotland. Aileen Barclay, University of Stirling and Lynne Hunter, University of Strathclyde. Context and Culture. 13. Children's Voices, Children's Rights. Ruth Emond, University of Stirling. 14. Therapeutic Approaches in Residential Child Care. Irene Stevens and Judy Furnivall, Scottish Institute of Residential Child Care, University of Strathclyde. 15. Staffing, Training and Recruitment: Outcomes for Young People in Resdiential Care in Three Countries. Claire Cameron and Janet Boddy, Institute of Education, University of London. 16. Leadership, Structure and Culture in Residential Child Care. Roger Bullock, Dartington Social Research Unit. Subject index. Author index.
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