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 Featured Title
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Health Advocacy, Inc.
How Pharmaceutical Funding Changed the Breast Cancer Movement
Sharon Batt  

$39.95 Hardcover
Release Date: 7/1/2017
ISBN: 9780774833844    


288 Pages





OTHER WAYS TO ORDER

About the Book

Today, most patient groups in Canada are funded by the pharmaceutical industry, raising an important ethical question: Do alliances between patient organizations and corporate sponsors ultimately lead to policies that are counter to the public interest? In this examination of Canada’s breast cancer movement from 1990 to 2010, health activist, scholar, and cancer survivor Sharon Batt investigates the relationship between patient advocacy groups and the pharmaceutical industry – and the hidden implications of pharma funding for health policy.

Health Advocacy, Inc. dissects the alliances between the companies that sell pharmaceuticals and the individuals who use them, drawing links between neoliberalism and corporate financing, and the ensuing threat to the public health care system. Batt combines archival analysis, interviews with advocacy and industry representatives, and personal observation to reveal how a reduction in state funding drove patient groups to form partnerships with the private sector. The resulting power imbalance continues to challenge the groups’ ability to put patients’ interests ahead of those of the industry.

Batt’s conclusion is unsettling: a once-vibrant movement that encouraged democratic participation in the development of health policy now eerily echoes the demands of the pharmaceutical industry. This thorough account of the shift from grassroots advocacy to Big Pharma partnership defines the struggles and stakes of activism in public health today.


About the Author(s)

Sharon Batt is an independent scholar and adjunct professor in the Department of Bioethics at Dalhousie University.


Table of Contents


Reviews

"This is a powerful insider account, coupled with excellent scholarship, of Big Pharma's doings in relation to the breast cancer movement. After reading this book, the only thing I wanted was more – more information on how this work applies to other countries and to other health advocacy movements. This is a vitally important book."
– Evelyne de Leeuw, director of the Centre for Health Equity Training Research and Evaluation (CHETRE) at the University of New South Wales, Australia

"This riveting history of the breast cancer movement chronicles, analyzes, and evaluates the relationship between patient advocacy organizations and the pharmaceutical industry. The author's auto-ethnographic observations shine brilliantly, and the issues she raises should incite debate about the need for medical reform and new health policy."
– Sergio Sismondo, Professor of Philosophy, Queen's University, and co-editor of The Pharmaceutical Studies Reader


Sample Chapter

A sample chapter of this title is not available at this time. For further information, please email info@ubcpress.ubc.ca.


Related Topics

Gender Studies
Women's Studies
Health/Medicine
Sociology


Other Ways To Order

In Canada, order your copy of Health Advocacy, Inc. from UTP Distribution at:

UTP Distribution
5201 Dufferin Street
Toronto, Ontario
M3H 5T8

Phone orders: 1(800)565-9523 or (416)667-7791
Fax orders: 1(800)221-9985 or (416)667-7832
Email: utpbooks@utpress.utoronto.ca

Ordering information for customers outside Canada


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