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The University of Arizona Press is the premier publisher of academic, regional, and literary works in the state of Arizona. They disseminate ideas and knowledge of lasting value that enrich understanding, inspire curiosity, and enlighten readers. They advance the University of Arizona’s mission by connecting scholarship and creative expression to readers worldwide.

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How It Is

The University of Arizona Press

Viola Cordova was the first Native American woman to receive a PhD in philosophy. Even as she became an expert on canonical works of traditional Western philosophy, she devoted herself to defining a Native American philosophy. Although she passed away before she could complete her life's work, some of her colleagues have organized her ...

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Sanctuaries of Earth, Stone, and Light

The University of Arizona Press

Over nearly three centuries, Jesuit, Franciscan, and Dominican missionaries built a network of churches throughout the "new world" of New Spain. Since the early twentieth century, scholars have studied the colonial architecture of southern New Spain, but they have largely ignored the architecture of the north. However, as this book clearly ...

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Mediating Knowledges

By Gwyneira Isaac; Foreword by Jim Enote
The University of Arizona Press

This book tells the story of the search by the Zuni people for a culturally relevant public institution to help them maintain their heritage for future generations. Using a theoretical perspective grounded in knowledge systems, it examines how Zunis developed the A:shiwi A:wan Museum and Heritage Center to mediate between Zuni and Anglo-...

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Dinosaur

The University of Arizona Press

Over a hundred million years ago, the area that is now Dinosaur National Monument attracted the behemoth creatures of its namesake with its plentiful supply of food and water. Renowned for its world- famous fossil quarry, Dinosaur National Monument is also home to two of the West's legendary whitewater rivers: the Yampa and the Green. In ...

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The Nature of Home

The University of Arizona Press

"As long as humans have been around, we've had to move in order to survive." So arises that most universal and elemental human longing for home, and so begins Greta Gaard's exploration of just precisely what it means to be at home in the world.

Gaard journeys through the deserts of southern California, through the High Sierras, the ...

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Stones Witness

The University of Arizona Press

Nine miles down a primitive trail, over hills of sand and rock, across ankle-deep streams, and around mires of quickmud lies Kiet Seel, a thirteenth-century ancestral Puebloan ruin. This is the place, ancient and enduring, from which Margaret Randall begins her meditations in Stones Witness. Randall explores her connections to land and ...

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Gender and Generation on the Far Western Frontier

The University of Arizona Press

As her family traveled the Oregon Trail in 1852, Mary Ellen Todd taught herself to crack the ox whip. Though gender roles often blurred on the trail, families quickly tried to re-establish separate roles for men and women once they had staked their claims. For Mary Ellen Todd, who found a "secret joy in having the power to set things moving,

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Expressing New Mexico

The University of Arizona Press

The culture of the Nuevomexicanos, forged by Spanish-speaking residents of New Mexico over the course of many centuries, is known for its richness and diversity. Expressing New Mexico contributes to a present-day renaissance of research on Nuevomexicano culture by assembling eleven original and noteworthy essays. They are grouped ...

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Crossing the Yard

The University of Arizona Press

Ever since he was asked to critique the poetry of a convicted murderer, he has lived in two worlds.

Richard Shelton was a young English professor in 1970 when a convict named Charles Schmid--a serial killer dubbed the "Pied Piper of Tucson" in national magazines--shared his brooding verse. But for Shelton, the novelty of meeting a death-

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Time of Grace

The University of Arizona Press

"I hole up in my own cozy cubicle and write, considering ways to make the approaching Thanksgiving holiday not just another day in this place. In prison, hope faces east; time is measured in wake-ups."

Time of Grace is a remarkable book, written with great eloquence by a former science teacher who was incarcerated for twelve ...

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Golden and Blue Like My Heart

The University of Arizona Press

For fans of pro soccer in Mexico City, the four most popular teams represent distinct identities that embody such attributes as political power, nationalism, and working-class values. One of these teams, the Pumas, is associated with youthfulness, and its equally youthful fans take pride in the fact that their heroes have not yet been ...

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I Swallow Turquoise for Courage

The University of Arizona Press

Á?k'idídaa' jini. The stories begin.

In poems that exude the warmth of an afternoon in the southwestern sun, Hershman John draws readers into a world both familiar and utterly new. Raised on a reservation and in boarding schools, then educated at a state university, John writes as a contemporary Navajo poet. His is a new voice--one ...

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Agua Santa / Holy Water

The University of Arizona Press

Drawing on oral and lyrical traditions, this book honors the grace and spirit of mothers, daughters, lovers, and goddesses. From a tribute to Frida Kahlo to advice from an Aztec goddess, the poems explore the intimate and sacred spaces of borderlands through many voices: a revolutionary, a domestic worker, a widow.

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Golden and Blue Like My Heart

The University of Arizona Press

For fans of pro soccer in Mexico City, the four most popular teams represent distinct identities that embody such attributes as political power, nationalism, and working-class values. One of these teams, the Pumas, is associated with youthfulness, and its equally youthful fans take pride in the fact that their heroes have not yet been ...

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North American Indigenous Warfare and Ritual Violence

The University of Arizona Press

Despite evidence of warfare and violent conflict in pre-Columbian North America, scholars argue that the scale and scope of Native American violence is exagerated. They contend that scholarly misrepresentation has denigrated indigenous peoples when in fact they lived together in peace and harmony. In rebutting that contention, this ...

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Struggle Over Utah's San Rafael Swell

The University of Arizona Press

The vast public lands of the American West are being transformed today, not geologically but conceptually. A century ago, visitors to western public lands were likely to be ranchers or miners. Today, the lands are popular destinations for campers, hikers, rock climbers, river runners, artists, and off-road-vehicle enthusiasts. These new ...

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Living Through the Generations

The University of Arizona Press

Navajo women's lives reflect the numerous historical changes that have transformed "the Navajo way." At the same time, in their behavior, beliefs, and values, women preserve the legacy of Navajo culture passed down through the generations. By comparing and contrasting three generations of Navajo women--grandmothers, mid-life mothers, and ...

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¿Qué Onda?

The University of Arizona Press

Angel was born in Arizona and is part of the in-crowd. She likes clubbing, dancing, and going to car shows. Betzayra is from Mexico City and, despite polio-related disabilities, is the confident group leader of the Mexican girls. Arturo is also from Mexico City; he dresses more fashionably than most other boys and is taunted by the ...

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Latin American Indigenous Warfare and Ritual Violence

The University of Arizona Press

This groundbreaking multidisciplinary book presents significant essays on historical indigenous violence in Latin America from Tierra del Fuego to central Mexico. The collection explores those uniquely human motivations and environmental variables that have led to the native peoples of Latin America engaging in warfare and ritual violence ...

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Gender, Indian, Nation

The University of Arizona Press

Until recently, few scholars outside of Ecuador studied the country's history. In the past few years, however, its rising tide of indigenous activism has brought unprecedented attention to this small Andean nation. Even so, until now the significance of gender issues to the development of modern Indian-state relations has not often been ...

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Sonoran Desert Life

The University of Arizona Press

This lavishly illustrated and informatively written book offers readers a guide to the Sonoran Desert that will enhance their understanding of the plants and animals that live there. Designed to be carried easily when traveling, it will enable the whole family to identify commonly found annuals, perennials, cactuses, shrubs, and trees, as ...

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Reclaiming Diné History

The University of Arizona Press

In this groundbreaking book, the first Navajo to earn a doctorate in history seeks to rewrite Navajo history. Reared on the Navajo Nation in New Mexico and Arizona, Jennifer Nez Denetdale is the great-great-great-granddaughter of a well-known Navajo chief, Manuelito (1816-1894), and his nearly unknown wife, Juanita (1845-1910). Stimulated ...

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From Quebradita to Duranguense

The University of Arizona Press

Salsa and merengue are now so popular that they are household words for Americans of all ethnic backgrounds. Recent media attention is helping other Caribbean music styles like bachata to attain a similar status. Yet popular Mexican American dances remain unknown and invisible to most non-Latinos.

Quebradita, meaning "little break," ...

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From Quebradita to Duranguense

The University of Arizona Press

Salsa and merengue are now so popular that they are household words for Americans of all ethnic backgrounds. Recent media attention is helping other Caribbean music styles like bachata to attain a similar status. Yet popular Mexican American dances remain unknown and invisible to most non-Latinos.

Quebradita, meaning "little break," ...

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Massacre at Camp Grant

The University of Arizona Press

On April 30, 1871, an unlikely group of Anglo-Americans, Mexican Americans, and Tohono O'odham Indians massacred more than a hundred Apache men, women, and children who had surrendered to the U.S. Army at Camp Grant, near Tucson, Arizona. Thirty or more Apache children were stolen and either kept in Tucson homes or sold into slavery in ...

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Iron Horse Imperialism

The University of Arizona Press

Available in paperback October 2008!

The Southern Pacific of Mexico was a U.S.-owned railroad that operated between 1898 and 1951, running from the Sonoran town of Nogales, just across the border from Arizona, to the city of Guadalajara, stopping at several northwestern cities and port towns along the way. Owned by the ...

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Millennial Landscape Change in Jordan

The University of Arizona Press

Stands of relict vegetation, soil horizons, and sedimentary deposits along with archaeological evidence suggest that during certain time spans within the past twenty millennia, Jordan was endowed with moister and more vegetated landscapes than the ones we see today.

In this detailed volume, Carlos E. Cordova synthesizes diverse ...

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The Ribbon of Green

The University of Arizona Press

Woody wetlands constitute a relatively small but extremely important part of the landscape in the southwestern United States. These riparian habitats support more than one-third of the region's vascular plant species, are home to a variety of wildlife, and provide essential havens for dozens of migratory animals. Because of their limited ...

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Massacre at Camp Grant

The University of Arizona Press

On April 30, 1871, an unlikely group of Anglo-Americans, Mexican Americans, and Tohono O'odham Indians massacred more than a hundred Apache men, women, and children who had surrendered to the U.S. Army at Camp Grant, near Tucson, Arizona. Thirty or more Apache children were stolen and either kept in Tucson homes or sold into slavery in ...

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Casino and Museum

The University of Arizona Press

The past twenty-five years have seen enormous changes in Native America. One of the most profound expressions of change has been within the Mashantucket Pequot Tribal Nation. The Nation has overcome significant hurdles to establish itself as a potent cultural and economic force highlighted by the Mashantucket Pequot Museum and Research ...

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The Desert Remembers My Name

The University of Arizona Press

My parents always told me I was Mexican. I was Mexican because they were Mexican. This was sometimes modified to "Mexican American," since I was born in California, and thus automatically a U.S. citizen. But, my parents said, this, too, was once part of Mexico. My father would say this with a sweeping gesture, taking in the smog, the ...

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A Question of Gravity and Light

The University of Arizona Press

It is rare to find contemporary American poetry that speaks to readers with engaging directness, free of pretense or posturing. That is exactly the kind of poetry that Blas Falconer writes. In his first collection, Falconer presents 46 poems that are emotionally forthright and linguistically evocative but written without affectation or ...

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Athapaskan Migrations

The University of Arizona Press

For access to the appendices (as downloadable pdf files) click here.
Migration as an instrument of cultural change is an undeniable feature of the archaeological record. Yet reliable methods of identifying migration are not always accessible.

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The Desert Remembers My Name

The University of Arizona Press

My parents always told me I was Mexican. I was Mexican because they were Mexican. This was sometimes modified to "Mexican American," since I was born in California, and thus automatically a U.S. citizen. But, my parents said, this, too, was once part of Mexico. My father would say this with a sweeping gesture, taking in the smog, the ...

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Zero at the Bone

The University of Arizona Press

Late one evening in the summer of 2003, Erec Toso arrived home to his wife and children after an ordinary day at his university office. In the darkness of his yard, a rattlesnake lay along the path, basking in the post-monsoon coolness. Toso, lost in thought, never saw the snake, which struck him on the foot and injected a huge dose of ...

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Elena Poniatowska

The University of Arizona Press

Descended from the last king of Poland, born in France, educated at a British grade school in Mexico and a Catholic high school in the United States, Hélène Elizabeth Louise Amelie Paula Dolores Poniatowska Amor--otherwise known as Elena--is a passionate, socially conscious writer who is widely known in Mexico and who deserves to be better ...

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Murray Springs

The University of Arizona Press

The Murray Springs Site in the upper San Pedro River Valley of southeast Arizona is one of the most significant Clovis sites ever found. It contained a multiple bison kill, a mammoth kill, and possibly a horse kill in a deeply stratified sedimentary context. Scattered across the buried occupation surface with the bones of late ...

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Protostars and Planets V

The University of Arizona Press

Increasing discoveries of new planets beyond our solar system are invigorating the quest for new knowledge and understanding of the birth of stars and planets. This new volume in the Space Science Series, with 249 contributing authors, builds on the latest results from recent advances in ground and space-based astronomy and in numerical ...

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The Wind Shifts

The University of Arizona Press

Join us across the nation with The Wind Shifts ON TOUR

The Wind Shifts gathers, for the first time, works by emerging Latino and Latina poets in the twenty-first century. Here readers will discover 25 new and vital voices including Naomi Ayala, Richard Blanco, ...

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Archaeological Anthropology

The University of Arizona Press

For centuries, the goal of archaeologists was to document and describe material artifacts, and at best to make inferences about the origins and evolution of human culture and about prehistoric and historic societies. During the 1960s, however, a number of young, primarily American archaeologists, including William Longacre, rebelled ...

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Raven Eye

The University of Arizona Press

Written from thirteen years of journals, psychic and earthly, this poetry maps an uprising of a borderland indigenous woman battling forces of racism and sexual violence against Native women and children. This lyric collection breaks new ground, skillfully revealing an unseen narrative of resistance on the Mexico-U.S. border. A powerful ...

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Brave New West

The University of Arizona Press

When Jim Stiles moved west from Kentucky in the 1970s to make Moab, Utah, his home, that corner of the rural West had already endured decades of obscurity, a uranium boom and then a bust, and was facing an identity crisis. What kind of economy would prevent Moab from becoming yet another ghost town? For more than two decades, ...

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Edward P. Dozier

The University of Arizona Press

Edward P. Dozier was the first American Indian to establish a career as an academic anthropologist. In doing so, he faced a double paradox--academic and cultural. The notion of objectivity that governed academic anthropology at the time dictated that researchers be impartial outsiders. Scientific knowledge was considered unbiased, ...

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Hurricanes and Carnivals

The University of Arizona Press

"In Mexico," writes Ilan Stavans in the introduction to this provocative new collection on Mexican culture and politics, " [the essay] is embraced as passionately as a sport." While the American essay may be personal and confessional or erudite and academic, it is presumed to be truthful. By contrast, the Mexican essay pushes the ...

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Mexico's Middle Class in the Neoliberal Era

The University of Arizona Press

Mexico's modern middle class emerged in the decades after World War II, a period of spectacular economic growth and social change. Though little studied, the middle class now accounts for one in five Mexican households. This path-breaking book explores the changing fortunes and political transformation of the middle class, especially ...

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Zion Canyon

The University of Arizona Press

Zion National Park has served as the stage set for more than twenty-five movies, including, most notably, Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid. It is also a popular tourist destination, boasting a visitor log of more than 2.5 million every year. During the summer months, tour buses rattle their way into the park almost hourly. Sightseers ...

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Unnatural Landscapes

The University of Arizona Press

Louisiana crawfish, cheatgrass, Russian thistle, Hottentot figs, rats, and sweet fennel. These and dozens of other seemingly benign flora and fauna have become some of the worst culprits in the destruction of ecosystems and native wildlife in the American Southwest and Baja California.

Although widely publicized threats--such as ...

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Notebooks of Elizabeth Cook-Lynn

The University of Arizona Press

An eclectic collection of poetry, prose, and politics, Notebooks of Elizabeth Cook-Lynn is a text, a narrative, a song, a story, a history, a testimony, a witnessing. Above all, it is a fiercely intelligent, brave, and sobering work that re-examines and interrogates our nation's past and the distorted way that its history has been written.

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Tribal Policing

The University of Arizona Press

What does it mean to be a tribal police officer? What are the complexities of that role? And how do tribal communities, tribal police departments, and other law enforcement agencies collaborate to address the alarmingly high rate of violent crime in Indian country? Author Eileen Luna-Firebaugh answers these and other questions in ...

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Senator Dennis DeConcini

The University of Arizona Press

Dennis DeConcini, a contemporary of Arizona greats like Sandra Day O'Connor, Barry Goldwater, and Rose Mofford, is an Arizona icon in his own right. Starting his public career as the Pima County Attorney, DeConcini orchestrated an unprecedented rise to a seat in the U.S. Senate, which he held for eighteen years. His political memoir, co-...

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