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The University of Arizona Press is the premier publisher of academic, regional, and literary works in the state of Arizona. They disseminate ideas and knowledge of lasting value that enrich understanding, inspire curiosity, and enlighten readers. They advance the University of Arizona’s mission by connecting scholarship and creative expression to readers worldwide.

Showing 31-60 of 1,688 items.

Intersectional Chicana Feminisms

Sitios y Lenguas

The University of Arizona Press

Advocating for and demonstrating the importance of an intersectional, multidisciplinary, activist understanding of Chicanas, Intersectional Chicana Feminisms provides a much-needed overview of the key theories, thinkers, and activists that have contributed to Chicana feminisms.

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Moquis and Kastiilam

Hopis, Spaniards, and the Trauma of History, Volume II, 1680–1781

The University of Arizona Press

The second of a two-volume series, Moquis and Kastiilam tells the story of the encounter between the Hopis, who the Spaniards called Moquis, and the Spaniards, who the Hopis called Kastiilam, from the Pueblo Revolt through 1781. Balancing historical documents with oral histories, it creates a fresh perspective on the interface of Spanish and Hopi peoples in the period of missionization.

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Colonial Cataclysms

Climate, Landscape, and Memory in Mexico’s Little Ice Age

The University of Arizona Press

Colonial Cataclysms explores the human and environmental consequences of the global climate event called the Little Ice Age as it played out in central Mexico during the era of Spanish imperialism. It focuses on the great floods, massive soil erosion, and human adaptations to these cataclysms.

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Reading Popol Wuj

A Decolonial Guide

The University of Arizona Press

Reading Popol Wuj offers readers a path to look beyond Western constructions of literature to engage with this text through the philosophical foundation of Maya thought and culture. This guide deconstructs various translations to ask readers—scholars, teachers, and graduate and undergraduate students—to break out of the colonial mold in approaching this seminal Maya text.

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Sown in Earth

Essays of Memory and Belonging

The University of Arizona Press

Heart-wrenching autobiographical stories from an award-winning Latinx writer.

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Our Bearings

Poems

The University of Arizona Press
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Cycles of Conquest

The Impact of Spain, Mexico, and the United States on Indians of the Southwest, 1533–1960

The University of Arizona Press
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North American Borders in Comparative Perspective

The University of Arizona Press

In North American Borders in Comparative Perspective leading scholars provide a contemporary analysis of how globalization and security imperatives have redefined the shared border regions of the United States, Canada, and Mexico.
 

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Land Uprising

Native Story Power and the Insurgent Horizons of Latinx Indigeneity

The University of Arizona Press

Land Uprising reframes Indigenous land reclamation as a horizon to decolonize the settler colonial conditions of literary, intellectual, and activist labor. Simón Ventura Trujillo argues that land provides grounding for rethinking the connection between Native storytelling practices and Latinx racialization across overlapping colonial and nation-state forms.

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The Sovereign Street

Making Revolution in Urban Bolivia

The University of Arizona Press

The Sovereign Street offers a rare look at political revolution as it happens, showing how mass street protest can change national political life.  It documents a critical period in twenty-first century Bolivia, when small-town protests made headlines worldwide, where a generation of pro-globalization policies were called into question, and where the indigenous majority stepped into government power for the first time in five centuries.

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The Ecolaboratory

Environmental Governance and Economic Development in Costa Rica

The University of Arizona Press
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The Saguaro Cactus

A Natural History

The University of Arizona Press

The saguaro, with its great size and characteristic shape, has become the emblem of the Sonoran Desert of southwestern Arizona and northwestern Mexico. This book offers a complete natural history of this enduring cactus, the largest and tallest in the United States. From its role in Sonoran Desert ecology, to its adaptations to the desert climate, to its sacred place in Indigenous culture, this book offers a definitive source on a distinguished desert plant.
 

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Science Be Dammed

How Ignoring Inconvenient Science Drained the Colorado River

The University of Arizona Press

Science Be Dammed is an alarming reminder of the high stakes in the management—and perils in the mismanagement—of water in the western United States. It offers important lessons in the age of climate change and underscores the necessity of seeking out the best science to support the decisions we make.

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Memories of Earth and Sea

An Ethnographic History of the Islands of Chiloé

The University of Arizona Press
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Border Brokers

Children of Mexican Immigrants Navigating U.S. Society, Laws, and Politics

The University of Arizona Press

Border Brokers examines the broader consequences of U.S. immigration policies on both immigrant and citizen members within mixed-status families. Christina Getrich offers the first book-length longitudinal study of children from mixed-status families.

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Footprints of Hopi History

Hopihiniwtiput Kukveni'at

The University of Arizona Press

Footprints of Hopi History illuminates how Hopis understand and value their ancestral landscapes. It offers fresh and innovative perspectives on archaeology and anthropology initiatives, and demonstrates how one tribal community significantly has advanced knowledge about its past through collaboration with archaeologists, anthropologists, and historians.

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Yolqui, a Warrior Summoned from the Spirit World

Testimonios on Violence

The University of Arizona Press

This is a testimonio, a historia profoundo of the culture of extralegal violence against the Red-Black-Brown communities in the United States that operates with impunity. Framed by Roberto Cintli Rodríguez’s personal testimony of police violence, this book is a clarion call to end that violence and those philosophies that permit such violence to flourish.

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Racial Alterity, Wixarika Youth Activism, and the Right to the Mexican City

The University of Arizona Press

Utilizing archival and ethnographic research, this book explores the construction of racial and ethnic imaginaries in the western Mexican cities of Guadalajara and Tepic, and the ways in which these imaginaries shape the contemporary experiences and activism of Wixarika (Huichol) Indigenous university students and professionals living, studying, and working in these two cities.

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The Border and Its Bodies

The Embodiment of Risk Along the U.S.-México Line

The University of Arizona Press

The increasingly militarized U.S.-México border is an intensely physical place, affecting the bodies of all who encounter it. The essays in this volume explore how crossing becomes embodied in individuals on the most basic social unit possible: the human body.

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Cultivating Knowledge

Biotechnology, Sustainability, and the Human Cost of Cotton Capitalism in India

The University of Arizona Press

Cultivating Knowledge highlights the agency, creativity, opportunism, and performance of individuals and communities carving out successful lives in a changing agricultural landscape. The practice of sustainable agriculture on the farm—let alone the global challenge of feeding or clothing the world—is a social question, not a technological one. Farmers do not make simple cost-benefit analyses when evaluating new technologies and options. Their choices have dire consequences, sometimes leading to death. Through an ethnography of seeds, Andrew Flachs investigates the human responses to global agrarian change.

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Detours

Travel and the Ethics of Research in the Global South

The University of Arizona Press

Detours is an attempt to crack cultural imperialism by bringing forth the personal as political in academia and research. Speaking from the intersection of race, class, and gender, the contributors explore the hubris and nostalgia that motivate returning again and again to a particular place. Through personal stories, they examine their changing ideas of Latin America and the Caribbean and how those places have shaped the people they’ve become, as writers, as teachers, and as activists.

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Divided Peoples

Policy, Activism, and Indigenous Identities on the U.S.-Mexico Border

The University of Arizona Press

Divided Peoples addresses the impact border policies have on traditional lands and the peoples who live there—whether environmental degradation, border patrol harassment, or the disruption of traditional ceremonies. Anthropologist Christina Leza shows how such policies affect the traditional cultural survival of Indigenous peoples along the border. The author examines local interpretations and uses of international rights tools by Native activists, counter-discourse on the U.S.-Mexico border, and challenges faced by Indigenous border activists when communicating their issues to a broader public.

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Kafka in a Skirt

Stories from the Wall

The University of Arizona Press

Short stories that highlight the folly of the human condition.

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How “Indians” Think

Colonial Indigenous Intellectuals and the Question of Critical Race Theory

The University of Arizona Press

This book shines light on Indigenous perspectives of Spanish colonialism through a novel interpretation of the works of the two most important Amerindian intellectuals in the Andes, Felipe Guaman Poma de Ayala and Garcilaso de la Vega, el Inca. Departing from the predominant scholarly position that views Indigenous-Spanish relations as the clash of two distinct cultures, Gonzalo Lamana argues that Guaman Poma and Garcilaso were the first Indigenous activist intellectuals and that they developed post-racial imaginaries four hundred years ago.

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Knowledge in Motion

Constellations of Learning Across Time and Place

The University of Arizona Press

Knowledge in Motion brings together archaeologists, historians, and cultural anthropologists to examine communities from around the globe as they engage in a range of practices constituting situated learned and knowledge transmission. The contributors lay the groundwork to forge productive theories and methodologies for exploring situated learning and its broad-ranging outcomes.

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Postcards from the Chihuahua Border

Revisiting a Pictorial Past, 1900s–1950s

The University of Arizona Press

Daniel D. Arreola’s Postcards from the Chihuahua Border is a colorful and dynamic visual history of Mexico’s northern border. Drawing on more than three decades of archival work, Arreola invites the reader to time travel, to revisit another era—the first half of the last century—when the border towns of Ciudad Juárez, Ojinaga, and Palomas were framed and made popular through picture postcards.

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Reclaiming Indigenous Governance

Reflections and Insights from Australia, Canada, New Zealand, and the United States

The University of Arizona Press
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A Diné History of Navajoland

The University of Arizona Press

A Diné History of Navajoland brings much-needed attention to Navajo perspectives on the past and present. It is the culmination of a lifelong commitment from the authors, and it is an exemplary work of Diné history through the lens of ceremonial knowledge and oral history. Kelley and Francis present an in-depth look at how scholars apply Diné ceremonial knowledge and oral history to present-day concerns of Navajo Nation leaders and community members. All readers are invited to come along on this exploration of Diné oral traditions.

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The Intimate Frontier

Friendship and Civil Society in Northern New Spain

The University of Arizona Press

Building on the most recent scholarship in borderlands history, The Intimate Frontier is an intellectual and social history that explores the immensely complex web of interpersonal relationships and layers of emotional sophistication inherent among frontier communities.

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