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The University of Arizona Press is the premier publisher of academic, regional, and literary works in the state of Arizona. They disseminate ideas and knowledge of lasting value that enrich understanding, inspire curiosity, and enlighten readers. They advance the University of Arizona’s mission by connecting scholarship and creative expression to readers worldwide.

Showing 301-350 of 1,157 items.

Mexican National Identity

The University of Arizona Press

In this enlightening book, the well-known historian William Beezley contends that a Mexican national identity was forged during the nineteenth century not by a self-anointed elite but rather by a disparate mix of ordinary people and everyday events. In examining independence festivals, children's games, annual almanacs, and the ...

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The Borders Within

The University of Arizona Press

Throughout its history, the nation that is now called the United States has been inextricably entwined with the nation now called Mexico. Indeed, their indigenous peoples interacted long before borders of any kind were established. Today, though, the border between the two nations is so prominent that it is front-page news in both countries.

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A Zapotec Natural History

The University of Arizona Press

A Zapotec Natural History is an extraordinary book and accompanying CD (also avialble on the web here!) that describe the people of a small town in Mexico and their remarkable knowledge of the natural world in which they live. San Juan Gbëë is a Zapotec Indian ...

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The Borders Within

The University of Arizona Press

Throughout its history, the nation that is now called the United States has been inextricably entwined with the nation now called Mexico. Indeed, their indigenous peoples interacted long before borders of any kind were established. Today, though, the border between the two nations is so prominent that it is front-page news in both countries.

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Social Violence in the Prehispanic American Southwest

The University of Arizona Press

Spontaneous acts of violence born of human emotions like anger or greed are probably universal, but social violence--violence resulting from social relationships within and between groups of people--is a much more complex issue with implications beyond archaeology. Recent research has generated multiple interpretations about the forms, ...

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The Silver of the Sierra Madre

The University of Arizona Press

In the great barranca known today as Copper Canyon, the small mining town of Batopilas once experienced a silver bonanza among the largest ever known. American investors, believing that Mexico offered an unexploited cornucopia, began purchasing mines in the Sierra Madre, seeking to expand their hold on natural resources outside U.S. borders.

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Trincheras Sites in Time, Space, and Society

The University of Arizona Press

The intriguing hilltop archaeological sites known as "cerros de trincheras" span almost three millennia, from 1250 BC to AD 1450. Archaeologists have long viewed them as a unitary phenomenon because they all have masonry architecture and occur mostly on low volcanic peaks. Scattered across the southwestern United States and northwestern ...

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Jim Burns' Arizona Birds

The University of Arizona Press

Arizona is renowned as a premier birding state, a place where many species rarely seen anywhere else in the country reach the northern end of their migratory range. Jim Burns' Arizona Birds is a lively portrayal of the habits and habitats of seventy-five of these unique southwestern species. Burns has written much more than a field guide, ...

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The Solar System Beyond Neptune

The University of Arizona Press

A new frontier in our solar system opened with the discovery of the Kuiper Belt and the extensive population of icy bodies orbiting beyond Neptune. Today the study of all of these bodies, collectively referred to as trans-Neptunian objects, reveals them to be frozen time capsules from the earliest epochs of solar system formation. This new ...

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Wings in the Desert

The University of Arizona Press

There is a common but often unspoken arrogance on the part of outside observers that folk science and traditional knowledge--the type developed by Native communities and tribal groups--is inferior to the "formal science" practiced by Westerners.

In this lucidly written and humanistic account of the O'odham tribes of Arizona and ...

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Negotiating the Past in the Past

By Norman Yoffee; Commentaries by Lynn Meskell and Jack Davis
The University of Arizona Press

Ralph Waldo Emerson once said that "all history becomes subjective," that, in fact, "properly there is no history, only biography." Today, Emerson's observation is hardly revolutionary for archaeologists; it has become conventional wisdom that the present is a battleground where interpretations of the events and meanings of the past are ...

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Ancestral Landscapes of the Pueblo World

The University of Arizona Press

The eastern Pueblo heartland, located in the northern Rio Grande country of New Mexico, has fascinated archaeologists since the 1870s. In Ancestral Landscapes of the Pueblo World, James Snead uses an exciting new approach-- landscape archaeology--to understand ancestral Pueblo communities and the way the people consciously or unconsciously ...

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Global Health

The University of Arizona Press

In this lesson-packed book, Mark Nichter, one of the world's leading medical anthropologists, summarizes what more than a quarter-century of health social science research has contributed to international health and elucidates what social science research can contribute to global health and the study of biopolitics in the future. Nichter ...

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Global Health

The University of Arizona Press

In this lesson-packed book, Mark Nichter, one of the world's leading medical anthropologists, summarizes what more than a quarter-century of health social science research has contributed to international health and elucidates what social science research can contribute to global health and the study of biopolitics in the future. Nichter ...

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Kartchner Caverns

The University of Arizona Press

It was all routine even if hundreds of pounds of earth were pressing down on their heads, even though the ceiling might potentially collapse at any moment, even if they were surrounded by a sea of darkness and had no idea what lay in front of them. Award-winning author Neil Miller soon tells us that what lay in front of amateur spelunkers ...

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The Women's Warrior Society

The University of Arizona Press

The Women's Warrior Society is a remarkable gathering of characters and voices used to expose truths about Native American life. In tightly woven prose, Lois Beardslee tells stories about people from all over North America and from either side of the line between abused and abuser. Both individual and archetypal, Native and non-Native, ...

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Pottery Economics in Mesoamerica

The University of Arizona Press

Pottery is one of the most important classes of artifacts available to archaeologists and anthropologists. Every year, volumes of data are generated detailing ceramic production, distribution, and consumption. How these data can be interpreted in relation to the social and cultural framework of prehistoric societies in Mesoamerica is the ...

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Ancestral Zuni Glaze-Decorated Pottery

The University of Arizona Press

The Pueblo IV period (AD 1275-1600) witnessed dramatic changes in regional settlement patterns and social configurations across the ancestral Pueblo Southwest. Early in this interval, Pueblo potters began making distinctive polychrome vessels, often decorated with technologically innovative glaze paints. Archaeologists have linked these ...

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Miranda

The University of Arizona Press

One of the most significant Supreme Court cases in U.S. history has its roots in Arizona and is closely tied to the state's leading legal figures. Miranda has become a household word; now Gary Stuart tells the inside story of this famous case, and with it the legal history of the accused's right to counsel and silence.

Ernesto ...

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Arab/American

The University of Arizona Press

The landscapes, cultures, and cuisines of deserts in the Middle East and North America have commonalities that have seldom been explored by scientists--and have hardly been celebrated by society at large. Sonoran Desert ecologist Gary Nabhan grew up around Arab grandparents, aunts, uncles, and cousins in a family that has been emigrating ...

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If I Die in Juárez

The University of Arizona Press

From the red-light districts in Ciudad Juárez to remote villages hidden away in the mountains of Chihuahua comes a tale of one of the darkest crimes to be recorded in the history of humankind. If I Die in Juárez traces the lives of three young women--Evita, a street child; Petra, a maquiladora worker; and Mayela, a Tarahumara Indian girl--...

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Women and Change at the U.S.--Mexico Border

The University of Arizona Press

There's no denying that the U.S.-Mexico border region has changed in the past twenty years. With the emergence of the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA), the curtailment of welfare programs, and more aggressive efforts by the United States to seal the border against undocumented migrants, the prospect of seeking a livelihood--...

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The Region of Lost Names

The University of Arizona Press

Remember that the dream of one is the dream of everyone. Ernest is searching for a place where he can live beyond his past. His family has returned to Puerto Rico, and Ernest remains in the States, desiring only distance from his memories of childhood displacement and work, his parents' tumultuous relationship, and his own love for ...

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The Osage Rose

The University of Arizona Press

Corrupt lawmen, insatiable businessmen, and an oil boom on Indian land. This is the milieu in which Tom Holm sets his gritty and provocative detective novel. Life is looking easy for J. D. Daugherty, a crusty ex-cop who has set up his own PI firm in Tulsa, Oklahoma, just after World War I. J. D. expects to make a straightforward living off ...

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Landscapes of Fraud

The University of Arizona Press

From the actions of Europeans in the seventeenth century to the real estate deals of the modern era, people making a living off the land in southern Arizona have been repeatedly robbed of their way of life. History has recorded more than three centuries of speculative failures that never amounted to much but left dispossessed people in ...

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The Oldest We've Ever Been

The University of Arizona Press

I had this idea of where I should be in middle age, an image that had been born in the 1950s when I'd been a child watching Lassie on TV. As outdated as it was, that blurred snapshot somewhere at the back of my mind actually did have a green lawn, a house, a picket fence, and two kids: a boy and a girl. In the corner, there was my husband ...

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Diabetes among the Pima

The University of Arizona Press

For the past forty years, the Pima Indians living in the Gila River Indian Community have been among the most consistently studied diabetic populations in the world. But despite many medical advances, the epidemic is continuing and prevalence rates are increasing.

Diabetes among the Pima is the first in-depth ethnographic ...

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Edible Medicines

The University of Arizona Press

Chile pepper is used today as a flavoring, but Aztecs also applied it for toothache, sore throat, and asthma. The tonic properties of coffee have been recorded in Islamic pharmacopoeia since the eleventh century, and many peoples have used it to protect against Parkinson's disease. Although much has been documented regarding the ...

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The Women's Warrior Society

The University of Arizona Press

The Women's Warrior Society is a remarkable gathering of characters and voices used to expose truths about Native American life. In tightly woven prose, Lois Beardslee tells stories about people from all over North America and from either side of the line between abused and abuser. Both individual and archetypal, Native and non-Native, ...

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The Colorado Plateau III

The University of Arizona Press

Roughly centered on the Four Corners region of the southwestern United States, the Colorado Plateau covers an area of 130,000 square miles. The relatively high semi-arid province boasts nine national parks, sixteen national monuments, many state parks, and dozens of wilderness areas. With the highest concentration of parklands in North ...

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Chicano San Diego

The University of Arizona Press

The Mexican and Chicana/o residents of San Diego have a long, complicated, and rich history that has been largely ignored. This collection of essays shows how the Spanish-speaking people of this border city have created their own cultural spaces. Sensitive to issues of gender--and paying special attention to political, economic, and ...

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Family Matters, Tribal Affairs

The University of Arizona Press

Carter Revard was born in the Osage Indian Agency town of Pawhuska, Oklahoma. One of seven children, he completed his first eight grades in a one-room country school, working as a janitor, farmhand, and greyhound trainer through high school. He won a radio quiz scholarship to the University of Tulsa, was awarded a Rhodes Scholarship,

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The Great Cacti

The University of Arizona Press

Towering over deserts, arid scrublands, and dry tropical forests, giant cacti grow throughout the Americas, from the United States to Argentina--often in rough terrain and on barren, parched soils, places inhospitable to people. But as David Yetman shows, many of these tall plants have contributed significantly to human survival.

...

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Corridors of Migration

The University of Arizona Press

In the San Joaquin Valley Cotton Strike of 1933, frenzied cotton farmers murdered three strikers, intentionally starved at least nine infants, wounded dozens of people, and arrested more. While the story of this incident has been recounted from the perspective of both the farmers and, more recently, the Mexican workers, this is the first ...

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Rebuilding Native Nations

Strategies for Governance and Development

The University of Arizona Press

Rebuilding Native Nations provides guidelines for creating new governance structures, rewriting constitutions, building justice systems, launching nation-owned enterprises, encouraging citizen entrepreneurs, developing new relationships with non-Native governments, and confronting the crippling legacies of colonialism.

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How It Is

The University of Arizona Press

Viola Cordova was the first Native American woman to receive a PhD in philosophy. Even as she became an expert on canonical works of traditional Western philosophy, she devoted herself to defining a Native American philosophy. Although she passed away before she could complete her life's work, some of her colleagues have organized her ...

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Sanctuaries of Earth, Stone, and Light

The University of Arizona Press

Over nearly three centuries, Jesuit, Franciscan, and Dominican missionaries built a network of churches throughout the "new world" of New Spain. Since the early twentieth century, scholars have studied the colonial architecture of southern New Spain, but they have largely ignored the architecture of the north. However, as this book clearly ...

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Mediating Knowledges

By Gwyneira Isaac; Foreword by Jim Enote
The University of Arizona Press

This book tells the story of the search by the Zuni people for a culturally relevant public institution to help them maintain their heritage for future generations. Using a theoretical perspective grounded in knowledge systems, it examines how Zunis developed the A:shiwi A:wan Museum and Heritage Center to mediate between Zuni and Anglo-...

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Dinosaur

The University of Arizona Press

Over a hundred million years ago, the area that is now Dinosaur National Monument attracted the behemoth creatures of its namesake with its plentiful supply of food and water. Renowned for its world- famous fossil quarry, Dinosaur National Monument is also home to two of the West's legendary whitewater rivers: the Yampa and the Green. In ...

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The Nature of Home

The University of Arizona Press

"As long as humans have been around, we've had to move in order to survive." So arises that most universal and elemental human longing for home, and so begins Greta Gaard's exploration of just precisely what it means to be at home in the world.

Gaard journeys through the deserts of southern California, through the High Sierras, the ...

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Stones Witness

The University of Arizona Press

Nine miles down a primitive trail, over hills of sand and rock, across ankle-deep streams, and around mires of quickmud lies Kiet Seel, a thirteenth-century ancestral Puebloan ruin. This is the place, ancient and enduring, from which Margaret Randall begins her meditations in Stones Witness. Randall explores her connections to land and ...

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Gender and Generation on the Far Western Frontier

The University of Arizona Press

As her family traveled the Oregon Trail in 1852, Mary Ellen Todd taught herself to crack the ox whip. Though gender roles often blurred on the trail, families quickly tried to re-establish separate roles for men and women once they had staked their claims. For Mary Ellen Todd, who found a "secret joy in having the power to set things moving,

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Expressing New Mexico

The University of Arizona Press

The culture of the Nuevomexicanos, forged by Spanish-speaking residents of New Mexico over the course of many centuries, is known for its richness and diversity. Expressing New Mexico contributes to a present-day renaissance of research on Nuevomexicano culture by assembling eleven original and noteworthy essays. They are grouped ...

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Crossing the Yard

The University of Arizona Press

Ever since he was asked to critique the poetry of a convicted murderer, he has lived in two worlds.

Richard Shelton was a young English professor in 1970 when a convict named Charles Schmid--a serial killer dubbed the "Pied Piper of Tucson" in national magazines--shared his brooding verse. But for Shelton, the novelty of meeting a death-

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Time of Grace

The University of Arizona Press

"I hole up in my own cozy cubicle and write, considering ways to make the approaching Thanksgiving holiday not just another day in this place. In prison, hope faces east; time is measured in wake-ups."

Time of Grace is a remarkable book, written with great eloquence by a former science teacher who was incarcerated for twelve ...

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Golden and Blue Like My Heart

The University of Arizona Press

For fans of pro soccer in Mexico City, the four most popular teams represent distinct identities that embody such attributes as political power, nationalism, and working-class values. One of these teams, the Pumas, is associated with youthfulness, and its equally youthful fans take pride in the fact that their heroes have not yet been ...

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I Swallow Turquoise for Courage

The University of Arizona Press

Á?k'idídaa' jini. The stories begin.

In poems that exude the warmth of an afternoon in the southwestern sun, Hershman John draws readers into a world both familiar and utterly new. Raised on a reservation and in boarding schools, then educated at a state university, John writes as a contemporary Navajo poet. His is a new voice--one ...

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Agua Santa / Holy Water

The University of Arizona Press

Drawing on oral and lyrical traditions, this book honors the grace and spirit of mothers, daughters, lovers, and goddesses. From a tribute to Frida Kahlo to advice from an Aztec goddess, the poems explore the intimate and sacred spaces of borderlands through many voices: a revolutionary, a domestic worker, a widow.

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Golden and Blue Like My Heart

The University of Arizona Press

For fans of pro soccer in Mexico City, the four most popular teams represent distinct identities that embody such attributes as political power, nationalism, and working-class values. One of these teams, the Pumas, is associated with youthfulness, and its equally youthful fans take pride in the fact that their heroes have not yet been ...

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North American Indigenous Warfare and Ritual Violence

The University of Arizona Press

Despite evidence of warfare and violent conflict in pre-Columbian North America, scholars argue that the scale and scope of Native American violence is exagerated. They contend that scholarly misrepresentation has denigrated indigenous peoples when in fact they lived together in peace and harmony. In rebutting that contention, this ...

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