UBC - Agency Logos - The University of Arizona Press

The University of Arizona Press is the premier publisher of academic, regional, and literary works in the state of Arizona. They disseminate ideas and knowledge of lasting value that enrich understanding, inspire curiosity, and enlighten readers. They advance the University of Arizona’s mission by connecting scholarship and creative expression to readers worldwide.

Showing 241-280 of 1,163 items.

Europa

The University of Arizona Press

Few worlds are as tantalizing and enigmatic as Europa, whose complex icy surface intimates the presence of an ocean below. Europa beckons for our understanding and future exploration, enticing us with the possibilities of a water-rich environment and the potential for life beyond Earth. This new volume in the Space Science Series, with ...

More info

The Sweet Smell of Home

The University of Arizona Press

A self-taught artist in several mediums who became known for stippling, Leonard Chana captured the essence of the Tohono O'odham people. He incorporated subtle details of O'odham life into his art, and his images evoke the smells, sounds, textures, and tastes of the Sonoran desert--all the while depicting the values of his people.

...

More info

The Sweet Smell of Home

The University of Arizona Press

A self-taught artist in several mediums who became known for stippling, Leonard Chana captured the essence of the Tohono O'odham people. He incorporated subtle details of O'odham life into his art, and his images evoke the smells, sounds, textures, and tastes of the Sonoran desert--all the while depicting the values of his people.

...

More info

Chicle

The University of Arizona Press

Although Juicy Fruit® gum was introduced to North Americans in 1893, Native Americans in Mesoamerica were chewing gum thousands of years earlier. And although in the last decade "biographies" have been devoted to salt, spices, chocolate, coffee, and other staples of modern life, until now there has never been a full history of chewing gum.

More info

The Road to Mount Lemmon

The University of Arizona Press

As you wind your way up the Catalina Highway, it doesn't matter whether you're a first-time visitor or a native Tucsonan; you know you're on the way to someplace special.

The Santa Catalina Mountains first captivated Tony Zimmerman on a 1937 hunting trip. Regard for the alpine beauty must have been in his genes--he was the son of Swiss ...

More info

Across the Plains

The University of Arizona Press

On April 30, 1849, Sarah Bayliss Royce, along with her husband, Josiah, and their daughter, Mary, left her home in Tipton, Iowa, and headed for California in a covered wagon. Along the way, she kept a diary which, nearly thirty years later, served as the basis for a memoir she titled Across the Plains. That book has been freshly ...

More info

Remedies for a New West

The University of Arizona Press

This wide-ranging collection of essays is intended to provoke both thought and action. The pieces collected here explore a variety of issues facing the American West--disappearing Native American languages, deteriorating air quality, suburban sprawl, species loss, grassland degradation, and many others--and suggest steps toward "healing." ...

More info

The Last Refuge of the Mt. Graham Red Squirrel

The University of Arizona Press

When the University of Arizona announced plans to build observatories on Mt. Graham, atop the Pinaleño Mountains, the construction was seen as a potential threat to an isolated species found only on this sky island. The Mt. Graham red squirrel was declared "endangered" by the US Fish and Wildlife Service. Legal action required the ...

More info

Winning Their Place

The University of Arizona Press

In January 1999, five women were elected to the highest offices in Arizona, including governor, secretary of state, attorney general, treasurer, and superintendent of public instruction. The "Fab Five," as they were dubbed by the media, were sworn in by U.S. Supreme Court Justice Sandra Day O'Connor, herself a former member of the Arizona ...

More info

Fair Bananas!

The University of Arizona Press

Bananas are the most-consumed fruit in the world. In the United States alone, the public eats about twenty-eight pounds of bananas per person every year. The total value of the international banana trade is nearly five billion dollars annually, with 80 percent of all exported bananas originating in Latin America. There are as many as ten ...

More info

A New Deal for Native Art

The University of Arizona Press

As the Great Depression touched every corner of America, the New Deal promoted indigenous arts and crafts as a means of bootstrapping Native American peoples. But New Deal administrators' romanticization of indigenous artists predisposed them to favor pre-industrial forms rather than art that responded to contemporary markets.

In A ...

More info

When the Rains Come

The University of Arizona Press

Life in the desert is a waiting game: waiting for rain. And in a year of drought, the stakes are especially high.

John Alcock knows the Sonoran Desert better than just about anyone else, and in this book he tracks the changes he observes in plant and animal life over the course of a drought year. Combining scientific knowledge with ...

More info

When the Rains Come

The University of Arizona Press

Life in the desert is a waiting game: waiting for rain. And in a year of drought, the stakes are especially high.

John Alcock knows the Sonoran Desert better than just about anyone else, and in this book he tracks the changes he observes in plant and animal life over the course of a drought year. Combining scientific knowledge with ...

More info

Native American Language Ideologies

The University of Arizona Press

Beliefs and feelings about language vary dramatically within and across NativeAmerican cultural groups and are an acknowledged part of the processes oflanguage shift and language death. This volume samples the language ideologiesof a wide range of Native American communitiesâ€"from the Canadian Yukon toGuatemalaâ€"to show their role in ...

More info

Ecology and Conservation of the San Pedro River

The University of Arizona Press

One of the last undammed perennial rivers in the desert Southwest, the San Pedro River in southeastern Arizona illustrates important processes common to many desert riparian ecosystems. Although historic land uses and climatic extremes have led to aquifer depletion, river entrenchment, and other changes, the river still sustains a rich and ...

More info

Criminal Justice in Native America

The University of Arizona Press

Native Americans are disproportionately represented as offenders in the U.S. criminal justice system, particularly in the southwestern and north-central regions. However, until recently there was little investigation into the reasons for their over-representation. Furthermore, there has been little acknowledgment of the positive ...

More info

The Neighbors of Casas Grandes

The University of Arizona Press

Casas Grandes, or Paquimé, in northwestern Mexico was of one of the few socially complex prehistoric civilizations in North America. Now, based on more than a decade of surveys, excavations, and field work, Michael Whalen and Paul Minnis provide a comprehensive new look at Casas Grandes and its surrounding communities in The Neighbors of ...

More info

The Ancient Andean Village

The University of Arizona Press

Although ancient civilizations in the Andes are rich in history--with expansive empires, skilled artisans, and vast temple centers--the history of the Andean foothills on the south coast of present-day Peru is only now being unveiled. Nasca, a prehispanic society that flourished there from AD 1 to 750, is best known for its polychrome ...

More info

Angeleno Days

The University of Arizona Press

Though he has spent half of his life elsewhere, Gregory Orfalea has remained obsessed with Los Angeles. That "brutal, beautiful city along the Pacific sea" shaped him and led to a series of essays originally published in the Los Angeles Times Magazine. These deeply moving pieces are gathered here together for the first time. ...

More info

what Iâ¿¿m on

The University of Arizona Press

Luis Valadez is a performance poet and his poems shout to be read aloud. It's then that their language dazzles most brightly. It's then that the emotions bottled up on the page explode beyond words. And there is plenty of emotion in these poems. Frankly autobiographical, they recount the experiences of a Mexican American boy growing up in ...

More info

Dead in Their Tracks

The University of Arizona Press

It is America's killing field, and the deaths keep mounting. As the political debate has intensified and demonstrators have taken to the streets, more and more illegal border-crossers die trying to cross the desert on their way to what they hope will be a better life.

The Arizona border is the deadliest immigrant trail in America today.

More info

Chicana and Chicano Art

The University of Arizona Press

This is the first book solely dedicated to the history, development, and present-day flowering of Chicana and Chicano visual arts. It offers readers an opportunity to understand and appreciate Chicana/o art from its beginnings in the 1960s, its relationship to the Chicana/o Movement and its leading artists, themes, current directions, and ...

More info

Dark Thirty

The University of Arizona Press

Writing sometimes in dialect, sometimes in gunshot bursts, sometimes in sinuous lines that snake across the page, Santee Frazier crafts poems that are edgy and restless. The poems in Dark Thirty, Frazier's debut collection, address subjects that are not often thought of as "poetic," like poverty, alcoholism, cruelty, and homelessness. ...

More info

Resolana

The University of Arizona Press

Villagers in northern New Mexico refer to the south-facing side of a wall as la resolana, meaning "the place where the sun shines." Every culture has a resolana, a place where the resolaneros--the villagers--gather, dialogue, and reflect on society, culture, and politics. The buried knowledge that emerges from this process may be "pure ...

More info

POEMA

The University of Arizona Press

Maurice Kilwein Guevara views the poem as a living art form that stretches well beyond the traditional bounds of poetry. Citing the Catalan avant-garde artist Joan Brossa, who printed the word POEMA on a clear lightbulb, Kilwein Guevara rethinks the interconnectedness of form, context, and meaning in a poem. While he is aware of the blood ...

More info

The Law Into Their Own Hands

The University of Arizona Press

Border security and illegal immigration along the U.S.-Mexico border are hotly debated issues in contemporary society. The emergence of civilian vigilante groups, such as the Minutemen, at the border is the most recent social phenomenon to contribute new controversy to the discussion. The Law Into Their Own Hands looks at the contemporary ...

More info

Collaborating at the Trowel's Edge

The University of Arizona Press

A fundamental issue for twenty-first century archaeologists is the need to better direct their efforts toward supporting rather than harming indigenous peoples. Collaborative indigenous archaeology has already begun to stress the importance of cooperative, community-based research; this book now offers an up-to-date assessment of how ...

More info

White But Not Equal

The University of Arizona Press

Check out "A Class Apart" - the new PBS American Experience documentary that explores this historic case! In 1952 in Edna, Texas, Pete Hernández, a twenty-one-year-old cotton picker, got into a fight with several men and was dragged from a tavern, robbed, and beaten. Upon ...

More info

Unearthing Indian Land

The University of Arizona Press

Unearthing Indian Land offers a comprehensive examination of the consequencesof more than a century of questionable public policies. In this book,Kristin Ruppel considers the complicated issues surrounding American Indianland ownership in the United States.

Under the General Allotment Act of 1887, also known as the Dawes Act,...

More info

Environmentalism in Popular Culture

Gender, Race, Sexuality, and the Politics of the Natural

The University of Arizona Press

In this thoughtful and highly readable book, Noël Sturgeon illustrates the myriad and insidious ways in which American popular culture depicts social inequities as “natural” and how our images of “nature” interfere with creating solutions to environmental problems that are just and fair for all.

More info

Of Earth and Sea

The University of Arizona Press

The Chilean coup d'état of 1973 was a watershed event in the history of Chile. It was also a defining moment in the life of writer Marjorie Agosín.

This collection of prose vignettes and free verse draws upon her experiences as a child in Chile, an expatriate abroad, and a minority Jew--even in the land she calls home--to create a ...

More info

Speaking from the Body

The University of Arizona Press

In compelling first-person accounts, Latinas speak freely about dealing with serious health episodes as patients, family caregivers, or friends. They show how the complex interweaving of gender, class, and race impacts the health status of Latinas--and how family, spirituality, and culture affect the experience of illness.

Here ...

More info

Chaco and After in the Northern San Juan

The University of Arizona Press

Chaco Canyon, the great Ancestral Pueblo site of the eleventh and twelfth centuries, remains a central problem of Southwestern archaeology. Chaco, with its monumental "great houses," was the center of a vast region marked by "outlier" great houses. The canyon itself has been investigated for over a century, but only a few of the more than ...

More info

The Buried Sea

The University of Arizona Press

A poem is a living library, a hospitable planet in black space, a bell waiting to wear the music of motion across stilled lands. Writers are the carriers of the voices around us. We are writers and readers in dark times when words are correctly understood as powerful weapons. --From the Introduction

Reading Rane Arroyo's poems ...

More info

Cultural Transmission and Material Culture

The University of Arizona Press

How and why people develop, maintain, and change cultural boundaries through time are central issues in the social and behavioral sciences in generaland anthropological archaeology in particular. What factors influence people to imitate or deviate from the behaviors of other group members? How are social group boundaries produced, ...

More info

Yaqui Homeland and Homeplace

The University of Arizona Press

In this illuminating book, anthropologist Kirstin Erickson explains how members of the Yaqui tribe, an indigenous group in northern Mexico, construct, negotiate, and continually reimagine their ethnic identity. She examines two interconnected dimensions of the Yaqui ethnic imagination: the simultaneous processes of place making and ...

More info

Aridland Springs in North America

The University of Arizona Press

Springs ecosystems are among the most structurally complicated, ecologically and biologically diverse, productive, evolutionarily provocative, and threatened ecosystems on earth. Springs are places where groundwater reaches the earth's surface through complex, tortuous, and sometimes lengthy flow paths. Historically, they have been revered ...

More info

Iron Horse Imperialism

The University of Arizona Press

Available in paperback October 2008!

The Southern Pacific of Mexico was a U.S.-owned railroad that operated between 1898 and 1951, running from the Sonoran town of Nogales, just across the border from Arizona, to the city of Guadalajara, stopping at several northwestern cities and port towns along the way. Owned by the ...

More info

Lost Laborers in Colonial California

The University of Arizona Press

Native Americans who populated the various ranchos of Mexican California as laborers are people frequently lost to history. The "rancho period" was a critical time for California Indians, as many were drawn into labor pools for the flourishing ranchos following the 1834 dismantlement of the mission system, but they are practically absent ...

More info

Natural Environments of Arizona

The University of Arizona Press

Best known for its cactus-studded deserts and the awe-inspiring Grand Canyon, Arizona boasts even more natural features that surprise visitors and continue to amaze longtime residents. Using C. H. Merriam's turn-of-the-twentieth-century descriptions of Arizona's life zones, Charles Lowe first defined those biotic communities in his 1964 ...

More info
Free Shipping   Blue
Find what you’re looking for...
Stay Informed

Receive the latest UBC Press news, including events, catalogues, and announcements.


Read past newsletters
Current Catalogue
Spring 2019 Canadian Cover
Publishers Represented
UBC Press is the Canadian agent for several international publishers. Visit our Publishers Represented page to learn more.