UBC - Agency Logos - The University of Arizona Press

The University of Arizona Press is the premier publisher of academic, regional, and literary works in the state of Arizona. They disseminate ideas and knowledge of lasting value that enrich understanding, inspire curiosity, and enlighten readers. They advance the University of Arizona’s mission by connecting scholarship and creative expression to readers worldwide.

Showing 271-300 of 1,675 items.

Anthropologies of Guayana

Cultural Spaces in Northeastern Amazonia

The University of Arizona Press

This important collection brings together the work of scholars from North America, South America, and Europe to reveal the anthropological significance of Guayana, the ancient realm of El Dorado and still the scene of gold and diamond mining. Beginning with the earliest civilizations of the region, the chapters focus on the historical ecology of the rain forest and the archaeological record up to the sixteenth century, as well as ethnography, ethnology, and perceptions of space. The book features extensive discussions of the history of a range of indigenous groups, such as the Waiwai, Trio, Wajãpi, and Palikur. Contributions analyze the emergence of a postcolonial national society, the contrasts between the coastlands and upland regions, and the significance of race and violence in contemporary politics.

More info

At the Desert's Green Edge

An Ethnobotany of the Gila River Pima

By Amadeo M. Rea; Foreword by Gary Paul Nabhan; Illustrated by Takashi Ijichi
The University of Arizona Press

Winner of the Society for Economic Botany’s Klinger Book Award, this is the first complete ethnobotany of the Gila River Pima, presented from the perspective of the Pimas themselves.

More info

Staking Claim

Settler Colonialism and Racialization in Hawai'i

The University of Arizona Press
More info

Huaorani Transformations in Twenty-First-Century Ecuador

Treks into the Future of Time

The University of Arizona Press

Like the Amazon forest where the Huaorani people find so much natural abundance, Laura Rival’s book is rich in insights. Capitalizing on her decades-long study and interactions in the community, Huaorani Transformations in Twenty-First-Century Ecuador brings new insights to the Huaorani’s unique way of relating to humans, to other-than-humans, and to the forest landscape they have inhabited for centuries.

More info

In Divided Unity

Haudenosaunee Reclamation at Grand River

The University of Arizona Press

In February 2006, the Six Nations community of Caledonia, Ontario, occupied a 132-acre construction site, reigniting a 200-year struggle to reclaim land and rights in the Grand River region. Framed by intersecting themes of knowledge production, political resurgence, and the contributions of Haudenosaunee women, In Divided Unity provides a model for critical Indigenous theory that remains grounded in community-based concerns and actions.

More info

Stand Up and Fight

Participatory Indigenismo, Populism, and Mobilization in Mexico, 1970–1984

The University of Arizona Press
More info

Fernando de Alva Ixtlilxochitl and His Legacy

The University of Arizona Press

Fernando de Alva Ixtlilxochitl and His Legacy provides a much-needed overview of the life, work, and contribution of an important seventeenth-century historian. The volume explores the complexities of Alva Ixtlilxochitl’s life and works, revising and broadening our understanding of his racial and cultural identity and his contribution to Mexican history.

More info

Capture These Indians for the Lord

Indians, Methodists, and Oklahomans, 1844-1939

The University of Arizona Press
More info

Intimate Grammars

An Ethnography of Navajo Poetry

The University of Arizona Press

Through the work of poets such as Luci Tapahonso, Laura Tohe, Rex Lee Jim, Gloria Emerson, Blackhorse Mitchell, Esther Belin, Sherwin Bitsui, and many others, Webster provides new ways of thinking about contemporary Navajo poets and poetry. Intimate Grammars offers an exciting new ethnography of speaking, ethnopoetics, and discourse-centered examinations of language and culture.

More info

Uprooting Community

Japanese Mexicans, World War II, and the U.S.-Mexico Borderlands

The University of Arizona Press

Uprooting Community examines the political cross-currents that resulted in detention of Japanese Mexicans during World War II. Selfa A. Chew reveals how the entire multiethnic social fabric of the borderlands was reconfigured by the absence of Japanese Mexicans.

More info

Archaeology and Apprenticeship

Body Knowledge, Identity, and Communities of Practice

The University of Arizona Press

Apprenticeship is broadly defined as the transmission of culture through a formal or informal teacher–pupil relationship. This collection invites a wide discussion, citing case studies from all over the world and yet focuses the scholarship into a concise set of contributions. This book also examines apprenticeship in archaeology against a backdrop of sociological and cognitive psychology literature, to enrich the understanding of the relationship between material remains and enculturation.

More info

A Passion for the True and Just

Felix and Lucy Kramer Cohen and the Indian New Deal

The University of Arizona Press

A Passion for the True and Just reveals the moral underpinnings of Felix and Lucy Kramer Cohen and their important contribution to the Indian New Deal. Alice Beck Kehoe illuminates Felix Cohen’s uncompromising commitment to the “true and the just,” rooted in his Jewish intellectual and moral heritage, and Social Democrat principles, that changed American legal philosophy.

More info

Ethnobiology for the Future

Linking Cultural and Ecological Diversity

The University of Arizona Press
More info

Death Valley

Painted Light

The University of Arizona Press

Death Valley: Painted Light is a book unlike any other about a landscape whose topographic relief and sheer beauty are unforgettable.

More info

Asegi Stories

Cherokee Queer and Two-Spirit Memory

The University of Arizona Press
More info

A Tale of Three Villages

Indigenous-Colonial Interactions in Southwestern Alaska, 1740–1950

The University of Arizona Press
More info

Knowledge in Motion

Constellations of Learning Across Time and Place

The University of Arizona Press

Knowledge in Motion brings together archaeologists, historians, and cultural anthropologists to examine communities from around the globe as they engage in a range of practices constituting situated learned and knowledge transmission. The contributors lay the groundwork to forge productive theories and methodologies for exploring situated learning and its broad-ranging outcomes.

More info

Chaco Revisited

New Research on the Prehistory of Chaco Canyon, New Mexico

The University of Arizona Press

Bringing together both up-and-coming and well-known scholars of Chaco Canyon, Chaco Revisited provides readers with refreshing and updated analyses of research collected over the course of a century. Addressing age-old questions surrounding the canyon using new methods, contributors prove that Chaco Canyon was even more complex and fascinating than previously understood.

More info

Weathering Risk in Rural Mexico

Climatic, Institutional, and Economic Change

The University of Arizona Press
More info

Florida

A Fire Survey

The University of Arizona Press

In this important new collection of essays on the region, Stephen J. Pyne colorfully explores the ways the region has approached fire management. Florida has long resisted national models of fire suppression in favor of prescribed burning, for which it has ideal environmental conditions and a robust culture. Out of this heritage the fire community has created institutions to match. The Tallahassee region became the ignition point for the national fire revolution of the 1960s. Today, it remains the Silicon Valley of prescription burning. How and why this happened is the topic of a fire reconnaissance that begins in the panhandle and follows Floridian fire south to the Everglades.

More info

California

A Fire Survey

The University of Arizona Press

In this collection of essays on the region, Stephen J. Pyne colorfully explores the ways the region has approached fire management and what sets it apart from other parts of the country. Pyne writes that what makes California’s fire scene unique is how its dramatically distinctive biomes have been yoked to a common system, ultimately committed to suppression, and how its fires burn with a character and on a scale commensurate with the state’s size and political power. California has not only a ferocity of flame but a cultural intensity that few places can match. California’s fires are instantly and hugely broadcast. They shape national institutions, and they have repeatedly defined the discourse of fire’s history. No other place has so sculpted the American way of fire.

More info

Sanctioning Matrimony

Western Expansion and Interethnic Marriage in the Arizona Borderlands

The University of Arizona Press

Sanctioning Matrimony provides a deep analysis of intermarriage in southern Arizona from 1860 to 1930. Sal Acosta utilizes vital records and census documents to demonstrate how interethnic relationships extended the racial fluidity of the Arizona borderlands.

More info

Weaving the Boundary

The University of Arizona Press

Evocative, haunting, and ultimately hopeful, this collection explores personal and collective memory through lenses of human loss, desire, violence, and love.

More info

Writing the Goodlife

Mexican American Literature and the Environment

The University of Arizona Press

The decolonial approaches found in Writing the Goodlife provide rich examples of mutually respectful relations between humans and nature. Ybarra’s book takes on two of today’s most discussed topics: environmentalism and Latina/o population growth. Ybarra shines a light on long-established traditions of environmental thought that have existed in Mexican American literary history for at least 150 years.

More info

The Fornes Frame

Contemporary Latina Playwrights and the Legacy of Maria Irene Fornes

The University of Arizona Press

A key way to view Latina plays today is through the foundational frame of playwright and teacher, Maria Irene Fornes, who has transformed American theatre. Considering Fornes’s legacy, Anne García-Romero shows how five award-winning playwrights continue to contest and complicate Latina theatre.

More info

American Indians and National Forests

The University of Arizona Press

Winner of the Forest History Society's Charles A. Weyerhaeuser Book Award, American Indians and National Forests shows how tribal nations and the U.S. Forest Service have dealt with important changes in forest ownership and forest use. Author Theodore Catton expertly covers two centuries of interplay to offer the first-ever look at the changing relationships between these two important groups of forest stewards.

More info

How Myth Became History

Texas Exceptionalism in the Borderlands

The University of Arizona Press

How Myth Became History emphasizes the heterogeneity of border communities and the foregrounding narratives often ignored, such as Mexican-indio histories. John E. Dean provides critical insight into the vexed status of the contemporary Texas-Mexico divide and points to broader implications for national and transnational identity.

More info

Indigenous Pop

Native American Music from Jazz to Hip Hop

The University of Arizona Press

Indigenous Pop vividly addresses the importance of Native musicians and popular musical genres, establishing their origins and discussing what they represent.

More info
Find what you’re looking for...
Free Shipping   Blue
Stay Informed

Receive the latest UBC Press news, including events, catalogues, and announcements.


Read past newsletters
Current Catalogue
Fall 2019 Canadian Cover
Publishers Represented
UBC Press is the Canadian agent for several international publishers. Visit our Publishers Represented page to learn more.