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The University of Arizona Press is the premier publisher of academic, regional, and literary works in the state of Arizona. They disseminate ideas and knowledge of lasting value that enrich understanding, inspire curiosity, and enlighten readers. They advance the University of Arizona’s mission by connecting scholarship and creative expression to readers worldwide.

Showing 501-550 of 1,688 items.

New Lives for Ancient and Extinct Crops

Edited by Paul E. Minnis
The University of Arizona Press
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Howling for Justice

New Perspectives on Leslie Marmon Silko's Almanac of the Dead

Edited by Rebecca Tillett
The University of Arizona Press
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Ambitious Rebels

Remaking Honor, Law, and Liberalism in Venezuela, 1780-1850

The University of Arizona Press
By examining everyday life in Venezuela’s post-colonial period, Reuben Zahler provides a broad perspective on conditions throughout the Americas, and the tension between traditional norms and new liberal standards during Venezuela’s transformation from a Spanish colony to a modern republic.
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Silent Violence

Global Health, Malaria, and Child Survival in Tanzania

The University of Arizona Press

Seeking to link social, economic, and political forces to local experiences of sickness and suffering, Silent Violence analyzes the experiences and practices of people most deeply affected by malaria. Vinay Kamat explores the experience of individuals and households confronted by malaria against the backdrop of social and health issues.

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Seeds of Resistance, Seeds of Hope

Place and Agency in the Conservation of Biodiversity

The University of Arizona Press

Without denying the gravity of the problems of feeding the earth’s population while conserving its natural resources, Seeds of Resistance, Seeds of Hope reminds us that there are many positive movements and developments, especially at the grass-roots level, that demonstrate the power of opposition and optimism.

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Knowing the Day, Knowing the World

Engaging Amerindian Thought in Public Archaeology

The University of Arizona Press

Based on more than a decade of research in Palikur lands known as Arukwa in the state of Amapá, Brazil, Knowing the Day, Knowing the World demonstrates both the challenges of comprehending alternative cosmologies and the rich rewards of grappling with Amerindian ways of thinking and knowing.

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The Archaeology of Kinship

Advancing Interpretation and Contributions to Theory

The University of Arizona Press

This book explains how kinship is relevant to contemporary archaeological theory, detailing methods appropriate for archaeological analysis, and provides long-overdue solutions to problems plaguing ethnological hypotheses on the origins and contexts of kinship behaviors.

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Uncharted Terrains

New Directions in Border Research Methodology, Ethics, and Practice

The University of Arizona Press

New Directions in Border Research Methodology, Ethics, and Practice looks at the stigmatization of immigrants since the U.S. began focusing on securing its border with Mexico in 2001. These researchers explore ethical questions concerning border research methodology, and the political and social implications of U.S. immigration policies and programs.

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Complex Communities

The Archaeology of Early Iron Age West-Central Jordan

The University of Arizona Press

Complex Communities explores how sustainable communities developed and flourished in the Middle East nearly four thousand years ago. From archaeological evidence, Benjamin W. Porter reconstructs how the residents of small villages were able to adapt to changes in their environment, including climate change, and maintain their communities over time.

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Broken Souths

Latina/o Poetic Responses to Neoliberalism and Globalization

The University of Arizona Press

Broken Souths puts Latina/o and Latin American poets into sustained conversation in original and rewarding ways.

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A War that Can’t Be Won

Binational Perspectives on the War on Drugs

The University of Arizona Press

Forty years after Richard Nixon declared a “War on Drugs,” this sobering book offers views of the “narco wars” from scholars on both sides of the US-Mexico border. With evidence newly obtained through freedom-of-information inquiries in Mexico, it proposes practical solutions to a seemingly intractable crisis.

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Encountering Life in the Universe

Ethical Foundations and Social Implications of Astrobiology

The University of Arizona Press

Encountering Life in the Universe examines the intersection of scientific research and society to determine the philosophy and ethics of relating to the Earth and beyond.

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Brewing Arizona

A Century of Beer in the Grand Canyon State

The University of Arizona Press

Brewing Arizona is the first comprehensive book of Arizona beer. Beautifully illustrated, it includes every brewery known to have operated in the state, from the first to the latest, from crude brews to craft brews. Like a fine beer, the contents are deep and rich with just a little froth on top.

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A War that Can't Be Won

Binational Perspectives on the War on Drugs

The University of Arizona Press

Forty years after Richard Nixon declared a “War on Drugs,” this sobering book offers views of the “narco wars” from scholars on both sides of the US-Mexico border. With evidence newly obtained through freedom-of-information inquiries in Mexico, it proposes practical solutions to a seemingly intractable crisis.

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Indian Resilience and Rebuilding

Indigenous Nations in the Modern American West

The University of Arizona Press

This illuminating and comprehensive analysis of Native nations' resilience in the twentieth century demonstrates how Native Americans reinvented themselves, rebuilt their nations, and ultimately became major forces in the United States. Written by Donald L. Fixico, Indian Resilience and Rebuilding redefines how modern American history can and should be told.

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Milk and Filth

The University of Arizona Press

National Book Critics Circle Award Finalist Milk and Filth is a collection of forty-two poems exploring issues of gender, equality, sexuality and the artist-as-thinker in modern culture. Deftly blending a variety of tones, styles, and structure, Giménez Smith’s poems evocatively explores deep cultural issues.

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Where the Wind Blows Us

Practicing Critical Community Archaeology in the Canadian North

The University of Arizona Press
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Telling and Being Told

Storytelling and Cultural Control in Contemporary Yucatec Maya Literatures

The University of Arizona Press

Oral literature has been excluded from the analysis of Yucatec Maya literature, but it is a key component and a vital force in the cultural communities and their contemporary writing. Telling and Being Told shows the vital role Yucatec storytelling claims in Mayan ways of knowing and in the Mexican literary canon.
 

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Oral History, Community, and Work in the American West

Edited by Jessie L. Embry
The University of Arizona Press

The essays in this volume show how oral history can increase understanding of work and community in the twentieth century American West. Here an array of oral historians—including folklorists, librarians, and public historians—record what they have learned from people who have made their communities and have made history.

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More Than Two to Tango

Argentine Tango Immigrants in New York City

The University of Arizona Press

The world of Argentine tango presents a glamorous façade of music and movement. Yet the immigrant dancers whose livelihoods depend on the US tango industry receive little attention beyond their enigmatic public personas. More Than Two to Tango gives a detailed portrait of the Argentine immigrant community, where tango is both an art form and a means of survival.

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Coconut Milk

The University of Arizona Press

Coconut Milk is the first book-length collection of poems by contemporary queer Samoan writer and painter Dan Taulapapa McMullin. His poems humorously attack cultural appropriation, gender, and the hypocrisies of Western influence in Oceania today. Pulling at the stereotype of a beautiful Polynesia available for the taking, his poems challenge and carve out new avenues of meaning for Pacific Islanders.

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Therapeutic Nations

Healing in an Age of Indigenous Human Rights

The University of Arizona Press

Therapeutic Nations is one of the first books to demonstrate trauma's wide-ranging historical origins, and it offers a new indigenous feminist critique of the conversation of healing. Million's theoretical sophistication and original research make the book relevant across a range of disciplines as it challenges key concepts of American Indian and indigenous studies.

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Buried in Shades of Night

Contested Voices, Indian Captivity, and the Legacy of King Philip's War

The University of Arizona Press
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Indigeneity in the Mexican Cultural Imagination

Thresholds of Belonging

The University of Arizona Press
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Pueblo Indians and Spanish Colonial Authority in Eighteenth-Century New Mexico

The University of Arizona Press

Tracy L. Brown explores the impact of Spanish colonial interactions on Pueblo culture, using little-researched Spanish language documents from the eighteenth century. Pueblo peoples negotiated Spanish authority to maintain their own distinct ethnic identity.

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Mexico, Nation in Transit

Contemporary Representations of Mexican Migration to the United States

The University of Arizona Press

Spanning the social sciences and the humanities, Mexico, Nation in Transit poses a new, transnational alternative to the postnational view that geopolitical borders are being erased by the forces of migration and globalization, and the nationalist view that borders must be strictly enforced. It shows that borders, like identities, are not easy to locate precisely.

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Baja California Missions

In the Footsteps of the Padres

The University of Arizona Press

A stunning photographic tour of the eight remaining colonial missions in Baja California.

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Women and Ledger Art

Four Contemporary Native American Artists

The University of Arizona Press

In-depth look at the work and historical context of four contemporary female ledger artists.

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Communities of Practice

An Alaskan Native Model for Language Teaching and Learning

The University of Arizona Press
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From Enron to Evo

Pipeline Politics, Global Environmentalism, and Indigenous Rights in Bolivia

The University of Arizona Press

Offering a critique of both free-market piracy and the dilemmas of resource nationalism, From Enron to Evo is groundbreaking book for anyone concerned with Indigenous politics, social movements, and environmental justice in an era of expanding resource development.

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The Affinity of the Eye

Writing Nikkei in Peru

The University of Arizona Press

López-Calvo uses contemporary Nikkei texts such as fiction, testimonies, and poetry to construct an account of the cultural formation of Japanese migrant communities, and in so doing challenges fixed notions of Japanese Peruvian identity.

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Land Grab

Green Neoliberalism, Gender, and Garifuna Resistance in Honduras

The University of Arizona Press

This is a rich ethnographic account of the relationship between identity politics, neoliberal development policy, and rights to resource management in native communities on the north coast of Honduras. It also answers the question: can “freedom” be achieved under the structures of neoliberalism?

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The Ecological Other

Environmental Exclusion in American Culture

The University of Arizona Press

This book engages recent scholarship on trans-corporeality, disability studies, and environmental justice. Ray argues that environmental discourse often frames ecological crisis as a crisis of the body, therefore promoting ecological health at the cost of social equality. Ray urges us to be careful about the ways in which we construct “others” in our arguments to protect nature.

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When Worlds Collide

Hunter-Gatherer World-System Change in the 19th Century Canadian Arctic

The University of Arizona Press
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Chicana and Chicano Mental Health

Alma, Mente y Corazón

The University of Arizona Press

Chicana and Chicano Mental Health offers a model to understand and to address the mental health challenges and service disparities affecting Mexican immigrants and Mexican Americans/Chicanos. Yvette G. Flores, who has more than thirty years of experience as a clinical psychologist, provides in-depth analysis of the major mental health challenges facing these groups: depression, anxiety disorders, including post-traumatic stress disorder, substance abuse, and intimate partner violence.

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Voices of Play

Miskitu Children’s Speech and Song on the Atlantic Coast of Nicaragua

The University of Arizona Press

Voices of Play is an ethnography of multilingual play and performance among indigenous Miskitu children growing up in a diverse region of the Atlantic Coast of Nicaragua. Minks reveals the intertwining of speech and song and the emergence of self and other in a mobile, mixed indigenous community.

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Latin American Documentary Filmmaking

Major Works

The University of Arizona Press
Latin American Documentary Filmmaking is the first volume written in English to examine themes in major works of Latin American documentary films. Foster looks at the major ideological issues raised and the approaches to Latin American social and political history taken by key documentary films.
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Mapping Wonderlands

Illustrated Cartography of Arizona, 1912–1962

The University of Arizona Press

Mapping Wonderlands explores popular, illustrated maps of Arizona as a tourism destination, investigating the relationship between landscapes, visual culture, and narratives of place. These aesthetically appealing maps offer tourists an Arizona landscape at once historical and imaginary—just as their makers intended.

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Neandertal Lithic Industries at La Quina

The University of Arizona Press

This book employs new analytical techniques to expand our knowledge of Neandertal life in what is now southwestern France. Written by a senior researcher who developed sophisticated methods for analyzing chipped stone and animal bone artifacts, it adds significantly to scientific understanding of the Neandertals.

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Crafting History in the Northern Plains

A Political Economy of the Heart River Region, 1400–1750

The University of Arizona Press
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Senegal Taxi

The University of Arizona Press

A skillful collection of new prose poetry from one of our foremost poets that courageously and carefully asks readers to examine the meanings of childhood, genocide, and Africa.

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Leaving Tulsa

The University of Arizona Press

Leaving Tulsa, a book of road elegies and laments, travels from Oklahoma to the edges of the American continent through landscapes at once stark and lush, ancient and apocalyptic. Each poem gives the collection a rich lyrical-dramatic texture. Ultimately, these brave and luminous poems engage and shatter the boundaries of time, self, and continent.

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Rebozos de Palabras

An Helena María Viramontes Critical Reader

The University of Arizona Press

This is the first book to collect new essays written by multiple scholars that examine a Chicana or Latina author’s entire oeuvre. Focusing on the work of Helena María Viramontes, a scholar, critic, and author of both fiction and nonfiction, it also addresses the evolution of the Chicana image.

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Red-Inked Retablos

The University of Arizona Press

In the Mexican Catholic tradition, retablos are ornamental structures made of carved wood framing an oil painting of a devotional image, usually a patron saint. Acclaimed author and essayist Rigoberto González commemorates the passion and the pain of these carvings in his new volume Red-Inked Retablos, a moving memoir of human experience and thought. The collection offers an in-depth meditation on the development of gay Chicano literature and the responsibilities of the Chicana/o writer.

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At the Border of Empires

The Tohono O'odham, Gender, and Assimilation, 1880-1934

The University of Arizona Press
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Orientalism and Identity in Latin America

Fashioning Self and Other from the (Post)Colonial Margin

The University of Arizona Press

Building on the pioneering work of Edward Said in fresh and useful ways, contributors consider both historical contacts and literary influences in the formation of Latin American constructs of the “Orient” and the “Self” from colonial times to the present. In the process, they unveil wide-ranging manifestations of Orientalism.

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Barry Goldwater and the Remaking of the American Political Landscape

The University of Arizona Press
Barry Goldwater lost the race for the presidency in 1964, but his conservative agenda sparked a movement that has had profound and far-reaching effects on American politics and society. This is a long-overdue reconsideration of the life, times, and legacy of a polarizing politician who is as reviled as he is revered.
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Natural Takeover of Small Things

The University of Arizona Press

Natural Takeover of Small Things is a collection of poetry that offers an unflinching view of “California’s Heartland,” the San Joaquin Valley. In his distinctive, lyrical, pull-no-punches style, Tim Z. Hernandez offers a glimpse of the people, the landscape, the rhythm, and the detritus of the rural West. As Hernandez peels back the façade of the place, he reveals that home is not always where the heart is.

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Indigenous Agency in the Amazon

The Mojos in Liberal and Rubber-Boom Bolivia, 1842–1932

The University of Arizona Press

Indigenous Agency in the Amazon explores the underexamined story of indigenous people who accepted Jesuit mission life and then, nearly two centuries later, withstood the challenges of the rubber boom and the imposition of European liberalism.

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Indigenous Writings from the Convent

Negotiating Ethnic Autonomy in Colonial Mexico

The University of Arizona Press

Indigenous Writings from the Convent examines ways in which indigenous women participated in one of the most prominent institutions in colonial times—the Catholic Church—and what they made of their experiences with convent life.

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