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The University of Arizona Press is the premier publisher of academic, regional, and literary works in the state of Arizona. They disseminate ideas and knowledge of lasting value that enrich understanding, inspire curiosity, and enlighten readers. They advance the University of Arizona’s mission by connecting scholarship and creative expression to readers worldwide.

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Neandertal Lithic Industries at La Quina

The University of Arizona Press

This book employs new analytical techniques to expand our knowledge of Neandertal life in what is now southwestern France. Written by a senior researcher who developed sophisticated methods for analyzing chipped stone and animal bone artifacts, it adds significantly to scientific understanding of the Neandertals.

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Crafting History in the Northern Plains

A Political Economy of the Heart River Region, 1400–1750

The University of Arizona Press
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Senegal Taxi

The University of Arizona Press

A skillful collection of new prose poetry from one of our foremost poets that courageously and carefully asks readers to examine the meanings of childhood, genocide, and Africa.

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Leaving Tulsa

The University of Arizona Press

Leaving Tulsa, a book of road elegies and laments, travels from Oklahoma to the edges of the American continent through landscapes at once stark and lush, ancient and apocalyptic. Each poem gives the collection a rich lyrical-dramatic texture. Ultimately, these brave and luminous poems engage and shatter the boundaries of time, self, and continent.

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Rebozos de Palabras

An Helena María Viramontes Critical Reader

The University of Arizona Press

This is the first book to collect new essays written by multiple scholars that examine a Chicana or Latina author’s entire oeuvre. Focusing on the work of Helena María Viramontes, a scholar, critic, and author of both fiction and nonfiction, it also addresses the evolution of the Chicana image.

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Red-Inked Retablos

The University of Arizona Press

In the Mexican Catholic tradition, retablos are ornamental structures made of carved wood framing an oil painting of a devotional image, usually a patron saint. Acclaimed author and essayist Rigoberto González commemorates the passion and the pain of these carvings in his new volume Red-Inked Retablos, a moving memoir of human experience and thought. The collection offers an in-depth meditation on the development of gay Chicano literature and the responsibilities of the Chicana/o writer.

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At the Border of Empires

The Tohono O'odham, Gender, and Assimilation, 1880-1934

The University of Arizona Press
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Orientalism and Identity in Latin America

Fashioning Self and Other from the (Post)Colonial Margin

The University of Arizona Press

Building on the pioneering work of Edward Said in fresh and useful ways, contributors consider both historical contacts and literary influences in the formation of Latin American constructs of the “Orient” and the “Self” from colonial times to the present. In the process, they unveil wide-ranging manifestations of Orientalism.

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Barry Goldwater and the Remaking of the American Political Landscape

The University of Arizona Press
Barry Goldwater lost the race for the presidency in 1964, but his conservative agenda sparked a movement that has had profound and far-reaching effects on American politics and society. This is a long-overdue reconsideration of the life, times, and legacy of a polarizing politician who is as reviled as he is revered.
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Natural Takeover of Small Things

The University of Arizona Press

Natural Takeover of Small Things is a collection of poetry that offers an unflinching view of “California’s Heartland,” the San Joaquin Valley. In his distinctive, lyrical, pull-no-punches style, Tim Z. Hernandez offers a glimpse of the people, the landscape, the rhythm, and the detritus of the rural West. As Hernandez peels back the façade of the place, he reveals that home is not always where the heart is.

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Indigenous Agency in the Amazon

The Mojos in Liberal and Rubber-Boom Bolivia, 1842–1932

The University of Arizona Press

Indigenous Agency in the Amazon explores the underexamined story of indigenous people who accepted Jesuit mission life and then, nearly two centuries later, withstood the challenges of the rubber boom and the imposition of European liberalism.

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Indigenous Writings from the Convent

Negotiating Ethnic Autonomy in Colonial Mexico

The University of Arizona Press

Indigenous Writings from the Convent examines ways in which indigenous women participated in one of the most prominent institutions in colonial times—the Catholic Church—and what they made of their experiences with convent life.

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Hunter-Gatherer Archaeology as Historical Process

The University of Arizona Press

Hunter-Gatherer Archaeology as Historical Process seeks to show how hunter-gatherer societies were more complex than simple remnants of a prehistoric past. Combining the latest empirical studies of archaeological practice with the latest conceptual tools of anthropological and historical theory, this volume will be of great interest to anyone involved with the study of foraging peoples.

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A New American Family

A Love Story

The University of Arizona Press

This poignant but ultimately empowering memoir tells the story of Peter Likins, his wife Patricia, and the six children they adopted in the 1960s, building a family beset by challenges that ultimately strengthened all bonds.

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The Occult Life of Things

Native Amazonian Theories of Materiality and Personhood

The University of Arizona Press

Combining linguistic, ethnological, and historical perspectives, the contributors to this volume draw on a wealth of information gathered from ten Amerindian peoples belonging to seven different linguistic families to identify the basic tenets of what might be called a native Amazonian theory of materiality and personhood.

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Ritual and Remembrance in the Ecuadorian Andes

The University of Arizona Press

Ritual and Remembrance in the Ecuadorian Andes is, in its portrayal of Salasacan religious culture, both thorough and all-encompassing. Sections of the book cover everything from the performance of death rituals to stories about Amazonia as Salasacans interacted with outsiders—conquistadors and camera-toting tourists alike. Corr also investigates the role of shamanism in modern Salasacan culture, including shamanic powers and mountain spirits, and the use of reshaped, Andeanized Catholicism to sustain collective memory.

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Archaeology and Apprenticeship

Body Knowledge, Identity, and Communities of Practice

The University of Arizona Press

Apprenticeship is broadly defined as the transmission of culture through a formal or informal teacher–pupil relationship. This collection invites a wide discussion, citing case studies from all over the world and yet focuses the scholarship into a concise set of contributions. This book also examines apprenticeship in archaeology against a backdrop of sociological and cognitive psychology literature, to enrich the understanding of the relationship between material remains and enculturation.

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Gendered Scenarios of Revolution

Making New Men and New Women in Nicaragua, 1975–2000

The University of Arizona Press

Employing an approach that combines political economy and cultural analysis, Montoya argues that the Sandinistas collapsed gender contradictions into class ones, and the Sandinistas increasingly ruled by mandate as vanguard party instead of creating the participatory democracy that they professed to work toward. This book offers a reinterpretation of the revolution’s supposed failure.

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Decolonizing Indigenous Histories

Exploring Prehistoric/Colonial Transitions in Archaeology

The University of Arizona Press

This leading-edge volume explores how the inclusion of indigenous histories in analyses of colonialism, collaboration with contemporary communities and scholars across the subfields of anthropology, and the engagement with these histories and with indigenous peoples contributes constructively to the decolonization of archaeology as well as to broader projects of social justice.

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The Neighborhood as a Social and Spatial Unit in Mesoamerican Cities

The University of Arizona Press

Recent realizations that prehispanic cities in Mesoamerica were fundamentally different from western cities of the same period have led to increasing examination of the neighborhood as an intermediate unit at the heart of prehispanic urbanization. This book addresses the subject of neighborhoods in archaeology as analytical units between households and whole settlements.

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Conservation Biology and Applied Zooarchaeology

The University of Arizona Press

This book shows how zooarchaeology can productively inform conservation science. It both introduces applied zooarchaeology to conservation biologists and offers case studies that use animal remains from archaeological and paleontological sites to provide information that has direct implications for wildlife management and conservation biology today.

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The Village Is Like a Wheel

Rethinking Cargos, Family, and Ethnicity in Highland Mexico

The University of Arizona Press

This manifesto proposes a radical but commonsensical change to how anthropologists study people whose value systems are not their own. It focuses on rural highland peoples in Mexico, but its larger argument is that anthropologists’ approaches can distract them from what is truly important to the people whose lives they study.

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Stealing Shining Rivers

Agrarian Conflict, Market Logic, and Conservation in a Mexican Forest

The University of Arizona Press

Named Best Social Sciences Book (Latin American Studies Association, Mexico Section), this book describes how Chimalapas, a rainforest in Mexico’s southern state of Oaxaca, was appropriated and redefined by environmentalists. Molly Doane demonstrates that good intentions are not always enough to produce results that benefit both a habitat and its many different types of indigenous inhabitants.

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Time Commences in Xibalbá

By Luis de Lión; Translated by Nathan C. Henne; Afterword by Arturo Arias
The University of Arizona Press

Time Commences in Xibalbá tells the story of a violent village crisis in Guatemala sparked by the return of a prodigal son, Pascual. He had been raised tough by a poor, single mother in the village before going off with the military. When Pascual comes back, he is changed—both scarred and “enlightened” by his experiences. To his eyes, the village has remained frozen in time. After experiencing alternative cultures in the wider world, he finds that he is both comforted and disgusted by the village’s lingering “indigenous” characteristics.

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Crow-Omaha

New Light on a Classic Problem of Kinship Analysis

The University of Arizona Press

Why do people in a few societies scattered around the globe call relatives of different generations by the same terms? This question has perplexed anthropologists since 1871. A successor to the landmark 1998 book Transformations of Kinship, this volume includes the latest work on the “Crow-Omaha problem” from the world’s leading scholars.

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The Colorado Plateau V

Research, Environmental Planning, and Management for Collaborative Conservation

The University of Arizona Press
This volume, the fifth from the University of Arizona Press and the tenth overall, focuses on adaptation of resource management and conservation to climate change and water scarcity, protecting biodiversity through restructured energy policies, ensuring wildlife habitat connectivity across barriers, building effective conservation networks, and exploring new opportunities for education and leadership in conservation science.
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Rim Country Exodus

A Story of Conquest, Renewal, and Race in the Making

The University of Arizona Press

Herman examines the complex, contradictory, and very human relations between Indians, settlers, and Federal agents in late nineteenth- and early twentieth-century Arizona—a time that included Arizona’s brutal Indian wars. But while most tribal histories stay within the borders of the reservation, Herman also chronicles how Indians who left the reservation helped build a modern state with dams, hydroelectricity, roads, and bridges. With thoughtful detail and incisive analysis, Herman discusses the complex web of interactions between Apache, Yavapai, and Anglos that surround every aspect of the story.

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High Country Summers

The Early Second Homes of Colorado, 1880–1940

The University of Arizona Press
High Country Summers considers the emergence of the “summer home” in Colorado’s Rocky Mountains as both an architectural and a cultural phenomenon. Writing with affection and insight, Melanie Shellenbarger shows that these summer residences crossed boundaries of class, race, and gender—and helped shape our ideas about the American West.
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Forced Marches

Soldiers and Military Caciques in Modern Mexico

The University of Arizona Press

Forced Marches is a collection of innovative essays that analyze the influence of the military and militias in the century that followed Mexican independence. Contributors from the U.S. and the U.K. employ the “new military history” to engage with recent scholarship on the early national period, the Reform, the Porfiriato, and the Revolution.

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Corpse Whale

The University of Arizona Press

Poems steeped in an Inuit world view and juxtaposed with the urgency of the melting of the arctic.

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Hell of a Vision

Regionalism and the Modern American West

The University of Arizona Press

Focusing on the American West from the 1890s to the present, Richard Dorman provides a wide-ranging view of the impact of regionalist ideas in pop culture and diverse fields such as geography, land-use planning, anthropology, journalism, and environmental policy-making.

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A New Deal for Native Art

Indian Arts and Federal Policy, 1933-1943

The University of Arizona Press

Available for the first time in paperback!

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A Place All Our Own

Lives Entwined in a Desert Garden

The University of Arizona Press

Intertwined Lives is the delightful tale of creating a very special garden in one of the most extreme climates in the inhabited world. Told with wit and obvious affection, it will appeal to anyone who enjoys the pleasures of gardening—and everyone who enjoys a well-told, true-life nature tale.

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Comparative Indigeneities of the Américas

Toward a Hemispheric Approach

The University of Arizona Press

Comparative Indigeneities of the Américas highlights intersecting themes such as indigenismo, mestizaje, migration, displacement, autonomy, sovereignty, borders, spirituality, and healing that have historically shaped the experiences of Native peoples across the Américas. In doing so, it promotes a broader understanding of the relationships between Native communities in the United States and Canada and those in Latin America and the Caribbean and invites a hemispheric understanding of the relationships between Native and mestiza/o peoples.

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Matrons and Maids

Regulating Indian Domestic Service in Tucson, 1914–1934

The University of Arizona Press

This book recounts the fascinating story of the placing of Native American girls into the homes of white families for domestic service during their summer vacations from boarding schools run by the federal Office of Indian Affairs. It complicates our picture of “women’s work” and the complex involvement of white women as agents of colonization.

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Full Foreground

The University of Arizona Press

Tejada’s innovative work dramatically widens the scope of Latina/o literature, showing us exactly it can accomplish. The poems move very much like a three-act play, in which the first act is one of origins; the second, a staging of desire; and the third, a symbiosis. These acts magnify one another when unified. Each poem within the collection positions itself within the avant-garde, in which the artful use of language aims to dazzle, surprise, and enliven. The poems dance by, preserving a tension between hurry and delay, momentum and stasis, and every line is like a newly launched firecracker, sending out startling patterns of spark and flare.

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Butterfly Moon

Short Stories

The University of Arizona Press

Butterfly Moon is a collection of short stories based on folk tales from around the world. But the stories freely mingle fantasy and reality, witches and tricksters and everyday folks. Compellingly and poetically recounted, these enjoyably disturbing tales lead us to question what is real—and why reality matters.

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Pregnancy, Motherhood, and Choice in Twentieth-Century Arizona

The University of Arizona Press

Mary Melcher’s Pregnancy, Motherhood, and Choice in Twentieth-Century Arizona provides a deep and diverse history of the dramatic changes in childbirth, birth control, infant mortality, and abortion over the course of the last century. Using oral histories, memoirs, newspaper accounts, government documents, letters, photos, and biographical collections, this fine-grained study of women’s reproductive health places the voices of real women at the forefront of the narrative, providing a personal view into some of the most intense experiences of their lives.

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With Blood in Their Eyes

The University of Arizona Press

A thrilling new novel from the author of Crazy Heart.

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