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The University of Arizona Press is the premier publisher of academic, regional, and literary works in the state of Arizona. They disseminate ideas and knowledge of lasting value that enrich understanding, inspire curiosity, and enlighten readers. They advance the University of Arizona’s mission by connecting scholarship and creative expression to readers worldwide.

Showing 101-150 of 1,163 items.

Aconcagua

The University of Arizona Press

Joy Logan explores the many impacts of mountaineering's "discovery" of Aconcagua including its effect on how local indigenous history is understood.

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From Beneath the Volcano

The University of Arizona Press

In this collection of fascinating and revealing oral histories, Gorkin and Pineda portray the personal and social lives of Luis and his family, who for the past eighteen years have been working to rebuild their lives in their new community beneath the Guazapa volcano.

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Native American Performance and Representation

Edited by S. E. Wilmer
The University of Arizona Press

An important addition to the new and growing field of Native performance, Wilmer's book cuts across disciplines and areas of study in a way no other book in the field does. It will appeal not only to those interested in Native American studies but also to those concerned with women's and gender studies, literary and film studies, and cultural studies.

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Earth Wisdom

The University of Arizona Press

In the world of book publishing, this volume from a traditional Chumash woman elder is a first. It puts a 20th (and 21st) century face, name, identity, humanity, personality, and living voice on the term Chumash.

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Immigration Law and the U.S.–Mexico Border

The University of Arizona Press

In clear, reasonable prose, Johnson and Trujillo explore the long history of discrimination against US citizens of Mexican ancestry in the United States and the current movement against "illegal aliens."

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From Beneath the Volcano

The University of Arizona Press

In this collection of fascinating and revealing oral histories, Gorkin and Pineda portray the personal and social lives of Luis and his family, who for the past eighteen years have been working to rebuild their lives in their new community beneath the Guazapa volcano.

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Ideologies in Archaeology

The University of Arizona Press

Contributors to this volume focus on elements of life in past societies that "went without saying" and that concealed different forms of power as obvious and unquestionable.

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Mexico, Nation in Transit

The University of Arizona Press

Exploring representations of migration in literature, film, and music produced in the past twenty years, Christina Sisk argues that Mexico is imagined as a nation that exists outside of its territorial borders and into the United States.

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Smugglers, Brothels, and Twine

The University of Arizona Press

A historical perspective, from Mesoamerican counterfeits of cacao beans used as currency to cattle rustling to human trafficking; from Canada's and Mexico's different approaches to the illegality of liquor in the United States during Prohibition to contemporary case studies of the transnational movement of people, crime, narcotics, vice, and even ideas.

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Sing

Poetry from the Indigenous Americas

The University of Arizona Press

Anthology of Indigenous poetry from the Americas.

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Sovereign Erotics

A Collection of Two-Spirit Literature

The University of Arizona Press

Anthology of Native American Two-Spirit (gay, lesbian, transgender, queer) literature.

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The Archaeology of Native-Lived Colonialism

The University of Arizona Press

This book examines how communities from three aboriginal nations in what is now southwestern On-tario negotiated the changes that accompanied the arrival of Europeans and maintained a cultural continuity with their pasts that has been too often overlooked in conventional "master narrative" histories of contact.

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Codex Chimalpopoca

Edited by John Bierhorst
The University of Arizona Press

A transcription of the Nahuatl text, keyed to the translation, and a linguistic apparatus to help elucidate it.

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A Common Humanity

The University of Arizona Press

This is the first book to examine immigrant aid groups from the inside. Author Lane Van Ham spent more than three years observing the groups and many hours in discussions and interviews.

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The Other Latin@

The University of Arizona Press

A diverse collection of essays written by some of the best emerging and established contemporary writers of Latin origin to help answer the question: How can we treat U.S. Latina and Latino literature as a definable whole while acknowledging the many shifting identities within their cultures?

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Cooking the Wild Southwest

The University of Arizona Press

With this update to the classic Tumbleweed Gourmet, master cook Carolyn Niethammer opens a window on the incredible bounty of the southwestern deserts and offers recipes to help you bring these plants to your table.

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State Healthcare and Yanomami Transformations

The University of Arizona Press

A symmetrical anthropology that places the study of culture and cosmology squarely within the context of the modern nation-state and its institutions. Kelly explores Indian-white relations as seen through the operation of a state-run health system among the indigenous Yanomami of southern Venezuela.

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The Big Empty

The University of Arizona Press

This narrative shows that even though Great Plains history is fraught with personal and group tensions, violence, and distress, the twentieth century also brought about compelling social, economic, and political change.

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Rascuache Lawyer

The University of Arizona Press

Alfredo Mirandé, a sociology professor, Stanford Law graduate, and part-time pro bono attorney, represents clients who are rascuache--a Spanish word for "poor" or even "wretched"--and on the margins of society.

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Revolutionary Parks

The University of Arizona Press

Revolutionary Parks tells the surprising story of how forty national parks were created in Mexico during the latter stages of the first social revolution of the twentieth century.

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Winning Their Place

The University of Arizona Press

This landmark book chronicles for the first time the participation of Arizona women in the state's early politics. Incorporating impressive original research, Winning Their Place traces the roots of the political participation of women from the territorial period to after World War II.

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Calexico

The University of Arizona Press

A "sleepy crossroads that exists at a global flashpoint," Calexico serves as the reference point for veteran journalist Peter Laufer's chronicle of day-to-day life on the border. This wide-ranging, interview-driven book finds Laufer and travel companion/photographer on a weeklong road trip through the Imperial Valley and other border locales, engaging in earnest and revealing conversations with the people they meet along the way.

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From This Wicked Patch of Dust

The University of Arizona Press

Spanning four decades, this is a story of a family's struggle to become American and yet not be pulled apart by a maelstrom of cultural forces.

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The Big Empty

The University of Arizona Press

This narrative shows that even though Great Plains history is fraught with personal and group tensions, violence, and distress, the twentieth century also brought about compelling social, economic, and political change.

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Mario Vargas Llosa

The University of Arizona Press

An entirely new understanding of the relation between Vargas Llosa's political thought and his literary oeuvre.

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Natives Making Nation

Edited by Andrew Canessa
The University of Arizona Press

 This volume looks at how metropolitan ideas of nation employed by politicians, the media and education are produced, reproduced, and contested by people of the rural Andes--people who have long been regarded as ethnically and racially distinct from more culturally European urban citizens.

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Ethnographic Contributions to the Study of Endangered Languages

The University of Arizona Press

Provides theoretical and methodological tools for researchers and organizers to best address the specific needs of communities facing language endangerment.

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Imprints on Native Lands

The University of Arizona Press

Documents Moravian contributions to the Miskito settlement landscape in sixty-four villages of eastern Honduras through field observations of material culture, interviews with village residents, and research in primary sources in the Moravian Church archives.

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Navigating Climate Change Policy

The University of Arizona Press

An essential resource for policymakers and judges at all levels of government who deal with questions of climate governance.

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White Man’s Water

The University of Arizona Press

This critical ethnography employs vivid accounts of the Northern Cheyenne people to depict how problems with alcohol are culturally constructed, showing how differences in age, gender, and other social features can affect involvement with both drinking and sobriety.

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Memories of a Hyphenated Man

The University of Arizona Press

Memories of a Hyphenated Man is the unique story of Ram--n Eduardo Ruiz, established author and winner of the 1998 National Humani-ties Medal, who charted new directions in Latin American research through his writing. This personal tale poignantly addresses the ambigui-ties associated with race, class, citizenship, and nationality for ...

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Bedouin Ethnobotany

The University of Arizona Press

A Bedouin asking a fellow tribesman about grazing conditions in other parts of the country says first simply, "Fih hayah?" or "Is there life?" A desert Arab's knowledge of the sparse vegetation is tied directly to his life and livelihood.

Bedouin Ethnobotany offers the first detailed study of plant uses among the Najdi ...

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Northern Arizona University

The University of Arizona Press

This book looks at the buildings that have graced the campus of Northern Arizona University from 1898 to the present. With more than two hundred images of campus buildings, many of them never before published, Northern Arizona University: Buildings as History provides a wonderful pictorial chronicle of the campus that will interest architectural historians as well as all those who have called NAU home.

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Bitter Water

Diné Oral Histories of the Navajo-Hopi Land Dispute

The University of Arizona Press

This book presents the narratives of four Diné women who have resisted removal from a newly divided reservation in Arizona -- a chronicle of resistance as spoken from the hearts of those who have lived it.

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Planning Paradise

Politics and Visioning of Land Use in Oregon

The University of Arizona Press

This is the first book to tell the story of Oregon’s unique land-use planning system from its rise in the early 1970s to its near-death experience in the first decade of the 2000s.

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The Life-Giving Stone

The University of Arizona Press

A simple food-preparation device reveals complexities of an ancient culture. In this careful investigation into the cultural significance of a simple tool, Michael Searcy's ethnographic observations are guided by his interest in how grinding stone traditions have persisted--and how they are changing today--and by a desire to enhance archaeological interpretation of these stones that were fundamental to prehispanic agriculturalists with corn-based cuisines.

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Forty Miles from the Sea

The University of Arizona Press

Forty Miles from the Sea is a rare book that explores the symbiotic yet conflicted relationship that bound Mexican cities like Xalpa to the larger Atlantic world and considers the impact that these affiliations had on communication, and ultimately, the formation of national identity.

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Living with the Dead

The University of Arizona Press

This useful volume offers new insights into the many ways in which the dead and the living interacted in prehistoric and historic Mesoamerica. Here well-known scholars offer synergistic insights by employing historical sources, comparative art history, anthropology, and sociology, as well as archeology and anthropology. Together they uncover surprising commonalities across Mesoamerican cultures.

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Wild Horses of the West

History and Politics of America’s Mustangs

The University of Arizona Press

A comprehensive look at the evolutionary history and current plight of wild horses in the American west.

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The Book of Want

The University of Arizona Press

When Moses descended Mount Sinai carrying the Ten Commandments, he never could have foreseen how one family in Los Angeles in the early twenty-first century would struggle to live by them.

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Global Maya

The University of Arizona Press

Explores how rural peoples experience economic and cultural change as their country joins the global market, focusing on their thoughts about work to learn about Guatemala's changing economy. Case studies focus on workers in small-scale garment production, vegetable farming for local markets, agriculture grown for export, and garment assembly factories.

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Nature's Northwest

The University of Arizona Press

With a clear emphasis on the Pacific Northwest's political economy, environmental history, and its cultural and social heritage, Nature's Northwest makes a lively and colorful history of this region within a national and international context. Impressive in their synthesis of myriad historical facts, renowned historian William G. Robbins and Katrine Barber have created an intricate portrait of the twentieth-century Northwest.

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Neolithic Revolution in the Near East

The University of Arizona Press

This insightful text examines the Neolithic revolution in the Levantine Near East and the Mediterranean island of Cyprus. Based on thirty years of fieldwork, Simmons explores recent research and incorporates specific case studies of his own excavations. It's an invaluable resource for scholars and students of Near Easter archaeology and the origins of agriculture.

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People of Pascua

The University of Arizona Press

Edward H. Spicer was associated for many years with the Yaqui Indians of both Arizona and Sonora and came to be known as the leading scholarly authority on those people. People of Pascua, the second book he wrote about the Yaquis, presents sixteen life histories collected early in his research that tell what it meant to be a Native American and poor in the southwestern United States during the Great Depression.

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Nature's Northwest

The University of Arizona Press

With a clear emphasis on the Pacific Northwest's political economy, environmental history, and its cultural and social heritage, Nature's Northwest makes a lively and colorful history of this region within a national and international context. Impressive in their synthesis of myriad historical facts, renowned historian William G. Robbins and Katrine Barber have created an intricate portrait of the twentieth-century Northwest.

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Wild Sea

Eco-Wars and Surf Stories from the Coast of the Californias

The University of Arizona Press

One man’s quest to save the beaches of California and Baja California from a host of dangers.

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Dry River

The University of Arizona Press

In Dry River, author Ken Lamberton finds his way through a lifetime of exploring southern Arizona's Santa Cruz River. At once a cultural history lesson and a reminder to learn from the past, this book is both a story about the complexities of this troubled river and a celebration of one man's lifelong journey with the people and places touched by it.

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Trust in the Land

New Directions in Tribal Conservation

The University of Arizona Press

This book examines new and innovative ideas concerning Native land conservancies, providing advice on land trusts, conservation groups, and collaborations with Native and non-Native conservation movements, on how to protect their access to culturally important lands.

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Jesus and the Gang

The University of Arizona Press

This book examines the ways that young men and women in working-class neighborhoods of El Progreso, Honduras, understand and respond to gang and gun violence. Offering firsthand accounts of how these youths make use of religious discourse, narrative practices, or the inscription of tattooed images to navigate dangerous social settings, Jesus and the Gang is an unflinching look at how these young men turn away from perpetuating the cycle of violence and how Christianity serves a society where belonging is surviving.

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A New American Family

The University of Arizona Press

This poignant but ultimately empowering memoir tells the story Peter Likins, his wife, and six children they adopted, despite issues of race, age and health which normally would have made these children "unadoptable" by 1960s standards. A frank, open account of the difficulties that a family can face, An American Family is a wonderful narrative of the genesis of a family and a journey to the deepest parts of a father's heart.

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UBC Press is the Canadian agent for several international publishers. Visit our Publishers Represented page to learn more.