UBC - Agency Logos - The University of Arizona Press

The University of Arizona Press is the premier publisher of academic, regional, and literary works in the state of Arizona. They disseminate ideas and knowledge of lasting value that enrich understanding, inspire curiosity, and enlighten readers. They advance the University of Arizona’s mission by connecting scholarship and creative expression to readers worldwide.

Showing 91-120 of 1,698 items.

Sentient Lands

Indigeneity, Property, and Political Imagination in Neoliberal Chile

The University of Arizona Press

Sentient Lands is a historically grounded ethnography of the Mapuche people’s engagement with state-run reconciliation and land-restitution efforts. Piergiorgio Di Giminiani analyzes environmental relations, property, state power, market forces, and indigeneity to illustrate how land connections are articulated, in both landscape experiences and land claims.

More info

Seventeenth-Century Metallurgy on the Spanish Colonial Frontier

Pueblo and Spanish Interactions

The University of Arizona Press

A unique contribution to the archaeological literature on the Southwest, Seventeenth-Century Metallurgy on the Spanish Colonial Frontier introduces a wealth of data from one of the few known colonial metal production sites in the Southwest. Drawing upon ten seasons of excavation, archaeologist Noah H. Thomas provides an interpretation of data that is grounded in theories of agency, practice, and notions of value. This work brings to light a little-known aspect of the colonial experience: the production of metal by indigenous Puebloan people.

More info

Naming the World

Language and Power Among the Northern Arapaho

The University of Arizona Press

Naming the World is an ethnography of language shift among the Northern Arapaho. It focuses on the often subtle continuities and discontinuities in the society produced by the shift, as well as the diversity of community responses.

More info

Voices from Bears Ears

Seeking Common Ground on Sacred Land

By Rebecca Robinson; By (photographer) Stephen Strom
The University of Arizona Press

This stunning book captures the passion and history embedded in local conversations about public lands.

More info

Instruments of the True Measure

Poems

The University of Arizona Press

Instruments of the True Measure charts the coordinates and intersections of land, history, and culture. Lyrical passages map the parallel lives of ancestral figures and connect dispossessions of the past to lived experiences of the present.

More info

Here and There

A Fire Survey

The University of Arizona Press

Presented through a mixture of journalism, history, and literary imagination, Here and There moves the discussion on fire beyond the usual formulations of science and policy within a national narrative to one of thoughtful interpretation, analysis, and commentary. Centered on the unique complexities of fire management in a global world, Here and There offers a punctuation point to our understanding of wildfire.

More info

Forging Communities in Colonial Alta California

The University of Arizona Press

The influx of Spanish, Russian, and then American colonists into Alta California between 1769 and 1834 challenged both Native and non-Native people to reimagine communities not only in different places and spaces but also in novel forms and practices. The contributors to this volume draw on archaeological and historical archival sources to analyze the generative processes and nature of communities of belonging in the face of rapid demographic change and perceived or enforced difference.

More info

America’s Early Whalemen

Indian Shore Whalers on Long Island, 1650–1750

The University of Arizona Press

The Native Americans of Long Island were integral to the origin and development of the first American whaling enterprise in the years 1650 to 1750. John A. Strong has produced the authoritative source on Indians and shore whaling.

More info

The Making of a Mexican American Mayor

Raymond L. Telles of El Paso and the Origins of Latino Political Power

The University of Arizona Press

Politician Raymond L. Telles was the first Mexican American mayor of a major U.S. city and the first Mexican American U.S. ambassador. Mario T. García’s updated biography of the ambitious, distinguished, and talented Telles brings the Chicano struggle for political representation to a new generation of readers.

More info

Pasadena Before the Roses

Race, Identity, and Land Use in Southern California, 1771–1890

The University of Arizona Press

In Pasadena Before the Roses, historian Yvette J. Saavedra shows how Indigenous, Spanish, Mexican, and American groups each have redefined the meanings of land use to build their homes and their lives. This social and cultural history illustrates the interconnectedness of power, ideas of land use, and the negotiation of identity within multiple colonial moments.

More info

Land, Liberty, and Water

Morelos After Zapata, 1920–1940

The University of Arizona Press

Land, Liberty, and Water offers a political and environmental history of the aftermath of the 1910 Mexican Revolution by examining the insurgency's outcomes inside the diverse pueblos of the former Zapatistas during the 1920s and 1930s. Salinas gives readers interested in modern Mexico, the Zapatista revolution, and environmental history a deeply researched analysis of the outcomes of the nation’s most famous revolutionary insurgency.

More info

Blue Desert

Desert Monologues

The University of Arizona Press

A classic work of new journalism by a revered voice of the Southwest.

More info

Style and Story

Literary Methods for Writing Nonfiction

The University of Arizona Press
More info

Upstream

Trust Lands and Power on the Feather River

The University of Arizona Press

Upstream relates the history behind the nation’s largest state-built water and power conveyance system, California’s State Water Project, with a focus on Indigenous perspectives. Author Beth Rose Middleton Manning illustrates how Indigenous history should inform contemporary conservation measures. She uses a multidisciplinary and multitemporal approach and offers a vision of policy reform that will lead to improved Indigenous futures around the U.S.

More info

Frog Mountain Blues

By Charles Bowden; By (photographer) Jack Dykinga; Foreword by Alison Hawthorne Deming
The University of Arizona Press

When first published in 1987, Frog Mountain Blues documented the creeping sprawl of new development up the foothills of the Santa Catalina Mountains. Today, that development is fully visible, but Charles Bowden’s prescience to preserve and protect a sacred recreational space remains as vivid as ever. Accompanied by Jack W. Dykinga’s photographs from the original work, this book conveys the natural beauty of the Catalinas and warns readers that this unique wilderness could easily be lost.

More info

The Motions Beneath

Indigenous Migrants on the Urban Frontier of New Spain

The University of Arizona Press
More info

Global Indigenous Health

Reconciling the Past, Engaging the Present, Animating the Future

The University of Arizona Press
More info

México Beyond 1968

Revolutionaries, Radicals, and Repression During the Global Sixties and Subversive Seventies

The University of Arizona Press

México Beyond 1968 examines the revolutionary organizing and state repression that characterized Mexico during the 1960s and 1970s. It challenges the conception of the Mexican state as “exceptional” and underscores and refocuses the centrality of the 1968 student movement.

More info

Sor Juana

Or, the Persistence of Pop

The University of Arizona Press

Sor Juana: Or, The Persistence of Pop encapsulates the life, times, and legacy of seventeenth-century Mexican nun Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz. Ilan Stavans provides a biographical and meditative picture of how popular perceptions of her life and work both shape and reflect Latinx culture.

More info

Brazil's Long Revolution

Radical Achievements of the Landless Workers Movement

The University of Arizona Press

Economic crises in the Global North and South are forcing activists to think about alternatives. Author Anthony Pahnke argues that activists should look to the Global South and Brazil—in particular the Landless Workers Movement (MST)—for inspiration. Brazil’s Long Revolution shows how the MST positioned itself take advantage of challenging economic times to improve its members’ lives.

More info

Hegemonies of Language and Their Discontents

The Southwest North American Region Since 1540

The University of Arizona Press

Esteemed author Carlos G. Vélez-Ibáñez details the linguistic and cultural processes used by penetrating imperial and national states to establish language supremacy in the Southwest North American Region from 1540 to the present, and the manner in which those affected have responded and acted, often in dissatisfaction and at times with inventive adaptations.

More info

Yaqui Indigeneity

Epistemology, Diaspora, and the Construction of Yoeme Identity

The University of Arizona Press

The first book-length study of the representation of the Yaqui nation in literature, Yaqui Indigeneity examines the transborder Yaqui nation as interpreted through the Mexican and Chicana/o imaginary. Tumbaga identifies a community of Chicano-Yaqui authors whose writings reclaim their own Native identities and challenge Mexican and Chicana/o views of Indigeneity.

More info

The Shadow of the Wall

Violence and Migration on the U.S.-Mexico Border

Edited by Jeremy Slack, Daniel E. Martínez and Scott Whiteford; Foreword by Josiah Heyman; By (photographer) Murphy Woodhouse
The University of Arizona Press

Mass deportation is currently at the forefront of political discourse in the United States. This volume allows readers to understand the very real impact that mass removal to Mexico has on people’s lives. The Shadow of the Wall underscores the unintended social consequences of increased border enforcement, immigrant criminalization, and deportation along the U.S.-Mexico border.

More info

Vernacular Sovereignties

Indigenous Women Challenging World Politics

The University of Arizona Press

Indigenous women strategically use international norms to shape legal authority locally, defying Western practices of authority as they build what the author calls vernacular sovereignties.

More info

The Lives of Stone Tools

Crafting the Status, Skill, and Identity of Flintknappers

The University of Arizona Press

The Lives of Stone Tools gives voice to the Indigenous Gamo lithic practitioners of southern Ethiopia. Kathryn Weedman Arthur shows their perspective that stone tools are living beings with a life course. In so doing, Arthur subverts long-held Western perspectives on gender, skill, and lifeless status of inorganic matter.

More info

Beyond Alterity

Destabilizing the Indigenous Other in Mexico

The University of Arizona Press

The concept of “indigenous” has been entwined with notions of exoticism and alterity throughout Mexico’s history. In Beyond Alterity, authors from across disciplines question the persistent association between indigenous people and radical difference, and demonstrate that alterity is often the product of specific political contexts.

More info

Ten Thousand Years of Inequality

The Archaeology of Wealth Differences

The University of Arizona Press

Archaeology at last allows the humanity’s deep past to provide an account of the early manifestations of wealth inequality around the world. In this first systematic presentation of quantitative data on ancient inequality, archaeologists explore the nature and implications of wealth disparity in the distant past.

More info

Immigration and the Law

Race, Citizenship, and Social Control

The University of Arizona Press

In today’s highly charged atmosphere, Immigration and the Law gives readers a grounded and broad overview of U.S. immigration law in a single book. Encompassing issues such as shifting demographics, a changing criminal justice system, and a volatile political climate, this book offers a critical and sweeping look at the history and nuances of immigration law.

More info

Savage Kin

Indigenous Informants and American Anthropologists

The University of Arizona Press

In this provocative new book, Margaret M. Bruchac, an Indigenous anthropologist, turns the word savage on its head. Savage Kin explores the nature of the relationships between Indigenous informants such as Gladys Tantaquidgeon (Mohegan), Jesse Cornplanter (Seneca), and George Hunt (Tlingit), and early twentieth-century anthropological collectors such as Frank Speck, Arthur C. Parker, William N. Fenton, and Franz Boas.

More info
Free Shipping   Blue
Find what you’re looking for...
Stay Informed

Receive the latest UBC Press news, including events, catalogues, and announcements.


Read past newsletters
Current Catalogue
Fall 2019 Canadian Cover
Publishers Represented
UBC Press is the Canadian agent for several international publishers. Visit our Publishers Represented page to learn more.