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The University of Arizona Press is the premier publisher of academic, regional, and literary works in the state of Arizona. They disseminate ideas and knowledge of lasting value that enrich understanding, inspire curiosity, and enlighten readers. They advance the University of Arizona’s mission by connecting scholarship and creative expression to readers worldwide.

Showing 61-70 of 1,698 items.

Dude Lit

Mexican Men Writing and Performing Competence, 1955–2012

The University of Arizona Press
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Reframing the Northern Rio Grande Pueblo Economy

Edited by Scott Ortman
The University of Arizona Press

The archaeological record of the Northern Rio Grande exhibits the hallmarks of economic development, but Pueblo economies were organized in radically different ways than modern industrialized and capitalist economies. Contributors to Reframing the Northern Rio Grande Pueblo Economy explore the patterns and determinants of economic development in pre-Hispanic Rio Grande Pueblo society, building a platform for more broadly informed research on this critical process.

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Transcontinental Dialogues

Activist Alliances with Indigenous Peoples of Canada, Mexico, and Australia

The University of Arizona Press
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Spiral to the Stars

Mvskoke Tools of Futurity

The University of Arizona Press

Spiral to the Stars offers a critical and concrete map for community making that leverages Mvskoke way-finding tools of energy, kinship, knowledge, power, and spaces. It is must-have book for community organizers, radical pedagogists, and anyone wishing to empower and advocate for their community.

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Indigenous Interfaces

Spaces, Technology, and Social Networks in Mexico and Central America

The University of Arizona Press

Indigenous Interfaces rejects the myth that Indigeneity and information technology are incompatible through its compelling analysis of the relationships between Indigenous peoples and new media. The volume illustrates how Indigenous peoples are selectively and strategically choosing to interface with cybertechnology, highlights Indigenous interpretations of new media, and brings to center Indigenous communities who are resetting modes of communication and redirecting the flow of information. It convincingly argues that interfacing with traditional technologies simultaneously with new media gives Indigenous peoples an edge on the claim to autonomous and sovereign ways of being Indigenous in the twenty-first century.

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Unwriting Maya Literature

Ts'íib as Recorded Knowledge

The University of Arizona Press

Unwriting Maya Literature provides an important decolonial framework for reading Maya and other Indigenous texts. Through insightful analyses of Maya cultural productions—whether textiles or poetry—this perspective offers a point of departure for the study of Maya literature and art that is situated in an Indigenous way of performing the act of reading.

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Challenging Colonial Narratives

Nineteenth-Century Great Lakes Archaeology

The University of Arizona Press

Challenging Colonial Narratives pushes postcolonial thinking in archaeology in socially and politically meaningful directions.

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The Davis Ranch Site

A Kayenta Immigrant Enclave in Southeastern Arizona

The University of Arizona Press

In this volume, the results of Rex Gerald’s 1957 excavations at the Davis Ranch site in southeastern Arizona's San Pedro River Valley are reported in their entirety for the first time. Annotations to Gerald’s original manuscript and newly written material place Gerald’s work in the context of what is currently known regarding the late thirteenth-century Kayenta diaspora and the relationship between Kayenta immigrants and the Salado phenomenon.

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Bedouin Ethnobotany

Plant Concepts and Uses in a Desert Pastoral World

The University of Arizona Press
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Community-Based Participatory Research

Testimonios from Chicana/o Studies

Edited by Natalia Deeb-Sossa; Foreword by Louie F. Rodriguez
The University of Arizona Press

The first of its kind, Community-Based Participatory Research: Testimonios from Chicana/o Studies is a trailblazing collection of personal testimonies that showcase how understandings of community empowerment are incomplete as they have dismissed the variety of ways communities themselves have created social change strategies. In first-person accounts, Chicana/o researchers share their experience doing community-based participatory research (CBPR) praxis to illustrate its complexity and how it might be implemented to create sustainable change and community empowerment.

 

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UBC Press is the Canadian agent for several international publishers. Visit our Publishers Represented page to learn more.