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The University of Arizona Press is the premier publisher of academic, regional, and literary works in the state of Arizona. They disseminate ideas and knowledge of lasting value that enrich understanding, inspire curiosity, and enlighten readers. They advance the University of Arizona’s mission by connecting scholarship and creative expression to readers worldwide.

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Mission of Sorrows

Jesuit Guevavi and the Pimas, 1691–1767

The University of Arizona Press
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John Spring's Arizona

The University of Arizona Press
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The Sonoran Desert

Its Geography, Economy, and People

The University of Arizona Press
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Spanish Colonial Tucson

A Demographic History

The University of Arizona Press
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Forging the Copper Collar

Arizona's Labor-Management War of 1901–1921

The University of Arizona Press
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Northern New Spain

A Research Guide

The University of Arizona Press
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The Mollusks of the Arid Southwest

With an Arizona Check List

The University of Arizona Press
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Ceramic Ethnoarchaeology

The University of Arizona Press
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People of the Desert and Sea

Ethnobotany of the Seri Indians

The University of Arizona Press
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Sonoran Strongman

Ignacio Pesqueira and His Times

The University of Arizona Press
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Life and Labor on the Border

Working People of Northeastern Sonora, Mexico, 1886–1986

The University of Arizona Press

This book traces the development of the urban working class in northern Sonora over the period of a century. Drawing on an extensive collection of life histories over several generations, Heyman describes what has happened to families as people have left the countryside to work for American-owned companies in northern Sonora or to cross the border to find other employment.

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With the River on Our Face

The University of Arizona Press

Emmy Pérez’s With the River on Our Face flows through the Southwest and the Texas borderlands to the river’s mouth in the Rio Grande Valley/El Valle. The poems celebrate the land, communities, and ecology of the borderlands while merging and diverging like the iconic river in this long-awaited collection.

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Indian Pilgrims

Indigenous Journeys of Activism and Healing with Saint Kateri Tekakwitha

The University of Arizona Press
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Ancient Plants and People

Contemporary Trends in Archaeobotany

The University of Arizona Press

Ancient Plants and People is a timely discussion of the global perspectives on archaeobotany and the rich harvest of knowledge it yields. Contributors examine the importance of plants to human culture over time and geographic regions and what it teaches of humans, their culture, and their landscapes.

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Critical Indigenous Studies

Engagements in First World Locations

The University of Arizona Press
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Dodger Blue Will Fill Your Soul

The University of Arizona Press

A collection of short stories from the skirt edge of Latino Los Angeles, revealing the space between stereotypes.

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Stealing the Gila

The Pima Agricultural Economy and Water Deprivation, 1848-1921

The University of Arizona Press
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Discovering Paquimé

The University of Arizona Press

Based on a half century of modern research since the Joint Casas Grades Project, this book explores the recent discoveries about important site and its neighbors. Drawing the expertise of fourteen  scholars from the U.S., Mexico , and Canada, who have long worked in the region, the chapters revel new insights about Paquime and its influence, bringing this fascinating place and its story to light.

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The Northern Rockies

A Fire Survey

The University of Arizona Press

The Northern Rockies are one of three major hearths for America’s fire culture. They hold a major fire laboratory, an equipment development center, an aerial fire depot, and a social engagement with fire—even a literature. Missoula is to fire in the big backcountry what Tallahassee is to prescribed burning and what Southern California is to urban-wildland hybrids. On its margins, Boise hosts the National Interagency Fire Center. In this structured collection of essays on the region, Stephen J. Pyne explores what makes the Northern Rockies distinctive and what sets it apart from other regions of the country. Surprisingly, perhaps, the story is equally one of big bureaucracies and of generations that encounter the region’s majestic landscapes through flame.

The Northern Rockies is part of the multivolume series describing the nation’s fire scene region by region. The volumes in To the Last Smoke also cover Florida, the Northern Rockies, the Great Plains, the Southwest, and several other critical fire regions. The series serves as an important punctuation point to Pyne’s 50-year career with wildland fire—both as a firefighter and a fire scholar. These unique surveys of regional pyrogeography are Pyne’s way of “keeping with it to the end,” encompassing the directive from his rookie season to stay with every fire “to the last smoke.”

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The Southwest

A Fire Survey

The University of Arizona Press

Through a mixture of journalism, history, and literary imagination, fire expert Stephen J. Pyne provides a lively survey of what makes this region distinctive, moving us beyond the usual conversations of science and policy. Pyne explores the Southwest’s sacred mountains, including the Jemez, Mogollon, Huachucas, and Kaibab; its sky islands, among them the Chiricahuas, Mount Graham, and Tanque Verde; and its famous rims and borders. Together, the essays provide a cross-section of how landscape fire looks in the early years of the 21st century, what is being done to manage it, and how fire connects with other themes of southwestern life and culture.

The Southwest is part of the multivolume series describing the nation’s fire scene region by region. The volumes in To the Last Smoke also cover California, the Northern Rockies, the Great Plains, Florida, and several other critical fire regions. The series serves as an important punctuation point to Pyne’s 50-year career with wildland fire—both as a firefighter and a fire scholar. These unique surveys of regional pyrogeography are Pyne’s way of “keeping with it to the end,” encompassing the directive from his rookie season to stay with every fire “to the last smoke.”
 

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Learning the Possible

Mexican American Students Moving from the Margins of Life to New Ways of Being

The University of Arizona Press

Learning the Possible chronicles the experiences of five academically underprepared Mexican American students in their first year of college, aided by a federally funded one-year scholarship and support program called the College Assistance Migrant Program. CAMP works, says Reyes, and does so primarily by helping students develop new identities as successful learners.

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Archaeological Anthropology

Perspectives on Method and Theory

The University of Arizona Press

In this collection, four generations of Longacre protégés show how they are building upon and developing—but also modifying—the theoretical paradigm that remains at the core of Americanist archaeology. The contributions focus on six themes prominent in Longacre’s career: the intellectual history of the field in the late twentieth century, archaeological methodology, analogical inference, ethnoarchaeology, cultural evolution, and reconstructing ancient society.

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Object and Apparition

Envisioning the Christian Divine in the Colonial Andes

The University of Arizona Press

Based on thorough archival research combined with stunning visual analysis, Maya Stanfield-Mazzi demonstrates that Andeans were active agents in Catholic image-making and created a particularly Andean version of Catholicism. Object and Apparition describes the unique features of Andean Catholicism while illustrating its connections to both Spanish and Andean cultural traditions.

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Beyond Germs

Native Depopulation in North America

The University of Arizona Press

Beyond Germs: Native Depopulation in North America challenges the hypothesis that the massive depopulation of the New World was primarily caused by diseases brought by Europeans, which scholars used for decades to explain the decimation of the indigenous peoples of North America. Contributors expertly argue that blaming germs downplays the active role of Europeans in inciting wars, destroying livelihoods, and erasing identities.

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The Learned Ones

Nahua Intellectuals in Postconquest Mexico

The University of Arizona Press

In The Learned Ones Kelly S. McDonough gives sustained attention to the complex nature of Nahua intellectualism and writing from the colonial period through the present day. This collaborative ethnography shows the heterogeneity of Nahua knowledge and writing, as well as indigenous experiences in Mexico.

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The Tropical Deciduous Forest of Alamos

Biodiversity of a Threatened Ecosystem in Mexico

The University of Arizona Press
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A Zapotec Natural History

Trees, Herbs, and Flowers, Birds, Beasts, and Bugs in the Life of San Juan Gbëë

The University of Arizona Press
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O'odham Creation and Related Events

As Told to Ruth Benedict in 1927

Edited by Donald M. Bahr, with Ruth Benedict; Foreword by Barbara Babcock
The University of Arizona Press
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Anthropologies of Guayana

Cultural Spaces in Northeastern Amazonia

The University of Arizona Press

This important collection brings together the work of scholars from North America, South America, and Europe to reveal the anthropological significance of Guayana, the ancient realm of El Dorado and still the scene of gold and diamond mining. Beginning with the earliest civilizations of the region, the chapters focus on the historical ecology of the rain forest and the archaeological record up to the sixteenth century, as well as ethnography, ethnology, and perceptions of space. The book features extensive discussions of the history of a range of indigenous groups, such as the Waiwai, Trio, Wajãpi, and Palikur. Contributions analyze the emergence of a postcolonial national society, the contrasts between the coastlands and upland regions, and the significance of race and violence in contemporary politics.

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At the Desert's Green Edge

An Ethnobotany of the Gila River Pima

By Amadeo M. Rea; Foreword by Gary Paul Nabhan; Illustrated by Takashi Ijichi
The University of Arizona Press

Winner of the Society for Economic Botany’s Klinger Book Award, this is the first complete ethnobotany of the Gila River Pima, presented from the perspective of the Pimas themselves.

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Staking Claim

Settler Colonialism and Racialization in Hawai'i

The University of Arizona Press
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Huaorani Transformations in Twenty-First-Century Ecuador

Treks into the Future of Time

The University of Arizona Press

Like the Amazon forest where the Huaorani people find so much natural abundance, Laura Rival’s book is rich in insights. Capitalizing on her decades-long study and interactions in the community, Huaorani Transformations in Twenty-First-Century Ecuador brings new insights to the Huaorani’s unique way of relating to humans, to other-than-humans, and to the forest landscape they have inhabited for centuries.

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In Divided Unity

Haudenosaunee Reclamation at Grand River

The University of Arizona Press

In February 2006, the Six Nations community of Caledonia, Ontario, occupied a 132-acre construction site, reigniting a 200-year struggle to reclaim land and rights in the Grand River region. Framed by intersecting themes of knowledge production, political resurgence, and the contributions of Haudenosaunee women, In Divided Unity provides a model for critical Indigenous theory that remains grounded in community-based concerns and actions.

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Stand Up and Fight

Participatory Indigenismo, Populism, and Mobilization in Mexico, 1970–1984

The University of Arizona Press
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Fernando de Alva Ixtlilxochitl and His Legacy

The University of Arizona Press

Fernando de Alva Ixtlilxochitl and His Legacy provides a much-needed overview of the life, work, and contribution of an important seventeenth-century historian. The volume explores the complexities of Alva Ixtlilxochitl’s life and works, revising and broadening our understanding of his racial and cultural identity and his contribution to Mexican history.

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Capture These Indians for the Lord

Indians, Methodists, and Oklahomans, 1844-1939

The University of Arizona Press
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