Indigenous Studies

Showing 111-120 of 450 items.

Landscape of the Spirits

The University of Arizona Press

High above the noise and traffic of metropolitan Phoenix, Native American rock art offers mute testimony that another civilization once thrived in the Arizona desert. In the city's South Mountains, prehispanic peoples pecked thousands of images into the mountains' boulders and outcroppings—images that today's hikers can ...

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Landscape of the Spirits

The University of Arizona Press

High above the noise and traffic of metropolitan Phoenix, Native American rock art offers mute testimony that another civilization once thrived in the Arizona desert. In the city's South Mountains, prehispanic peoples pecked thousands of images into the mountains' boulders and outcroppings—images that today's hikers can ...

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Native Waters

The University of Arizona Press

Since the beginning of the reservation era, the bitter conflict between Indians and non-Indians over water rights was largely confined to the courtroom. But in the 1980s the federal government began to emphasize negotiated settlements over lawsuits, and the settlements are changing water rights in fundamental ways—not only for tribes but also for non-Indian communities that share scarce water resources with Indians.

In Native Waters, Daniel McCool describes the dramatic impact these settlements are having both on Indian country and on the American West as a whole. Viewing the settlements as a second treaty era, he considers whether they will guarantee the water future of reservations—or, like treaties of old, will require tribes to surrender vast resources in order to retain a small part of their traditional homelands. As one tribal official observed, "It's like your neighbors have been stealing your horses for many years, and now we have to sit down and decide how many of those horses they get to keep." Unlike technical studies of water policy, McCool's book is a readable account that shows us real people attempting to end real disputes that have been going on for decades. He discusses specific water settlements using a combination of approaches—from personal testimony to traditional social science methodology—to capture the richness, complexity, and human texture of the water rights conflict. By explaining the processes and outcomes in plain language and grounding his presentation in relevant explanations of Indian culture, he conveys the complexity of the settlements for readers from a wide range of disciplines.

Native Waters illustrates how America is coming to grips with an issue that has long been characterized by injustice and conflict, seeking to enhance our understanding of the settlements in the hope that this understanding will lead to better settlements for all parties. As one of the first assessments of a policy that will have a pervasive impact for centuries to come, it shows that how we resolve Indian water claims tells us a great deal about who we are as a nation and how we confront difficult issues involving race, culture, and the environment.

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Urban Voices

The University of Arizona Press

California has always been America's promised land—for American Indians as much as anyone. In the 1950s, Native people from all over the United States moved to the San Francisco Bay Area as part of the Bureau of Indian Affairs Relocation Program. Oakland was a major destination of this program, and once there, Indian people ...

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Making Native Space

Colonialism, Resistance, and Reserves in British Columbia

UBC Press

It presents the most comprehensive account available of perhaps the most critical mapping of space ever undertaken in BC – the drawing of the lines that separated the tiny plots of land reserved for Native people from the rest.

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Women and the White Man's God

Gender and Race in the Canadian Mission Field

UBC Press

Based on diaries, letters, and mission correspondence, this is the first comprehensive examination of women’s roles in Anglican missions that were active in northern British Columbia, Yukon, and the Northwest Territories between 1860 and 1940.

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Who are Canada's Aboriginal Peoples?

Recognition, Definition, and Jurisdiction

Foreword by Harry Daniels; Edited by Paul Chartrand
UBC Press, Purich Publishing

Timely, innovative, and progressive, this collection provides an essential frame of reference to measure the development of Aboriginal legal policy respecting recognition, definition and jurisdiction in Canada.

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Telling Stories the Kiowa Way

The University of Arizona Press

Among the Kiowa, storytelling takes place under familiar circumstances. A small group of relatives and close friends gather. Tales are informative as well as entertaining. Joking and teasing are key components. Group participation is expected. And outsiders are seldom involved. This book explores the traditional art of ...

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Telling Stories the Kiowa Way

The University of Arizona Press

Among the Kiowa, storytelling takes place under familiar circumstances. A small group of relatives and close friends gather. Tales are informative as well as entertaining. Joking and teasing are key components. Group participation is expected. And outsiders are seldom involved. This book explores the traditional art of ...

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Reclaiming Aboriginal Justice, Identity, and Community

UBC Press, Purich Publishing

At the heart of this timely and significant book is an alternative way of thinking about Aboriginal crime and justice.

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