Canadian History

Showing 101-110 of 464 items.

When Coal Was King

Ladysmith and the Coal-Mining Industry on Vancouver Island

UBC Press

The first scholarly history of the Ladysmith miners, the Great Strike of 1912-1914, and the coalmining industry on Vancouver Island.

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A Voyage to the North West Side of America

The Journals of James Colnett, 1786-89

UBC Press

The journal of James Colnett is the last unpublished account of the early maritime fur trade on the Northwest Coast.

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Negotiated Memory

Doukhobor Autobiographical Discourse

UBC Press

This demonstrates how the Doukhobors employed both “classic” and alternative forms of autobiography to communicate their views about communal living, vegetarianism, activism, and spiritual life, as well as to pass on traditions to successive generations.

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Canadians Behind Enemy Lines, 1939-1945

UBC Press

A history of the activities and lives of undercover Canadian operatives in Europe and Asia during World War II.

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Saints, Sinners, and Soldiers

Canada's Second World War

UBC Press

From labour conflicts to the black market to prostitution, this book examines the moral and social underbelly of Canada’s Second World War.

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CCF Colonialism in Northern Saskatchewan

Battling Parish Priests, Bootleggers, and Fur Sharks

UBC Press

An elegantly written history that documents the colonial relationship between the CCF and the Saskatchewan north.

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Tsawalk

A Nuu-chah-nulth Worldview

UBC Press

This book explores the Nuu-chah-nulth understanding of the universe as an integrated and orderly whole, providing a viable theoretical alternative that both complements and expands the view of reality presented by Western science.

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The Red Man's on the Warpath

The Image of the "Indian" and the Second World War

UBC Press

This book explores how wartime symbolism and imagery propelled the “Indian problem” onto the national agenda, and why assimilation remained the goal of post-war Canadian Indian policy – even though the war required that it be rationalized in new ways.

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Northern Exposures

Photographing and Filming the Canadian North, 1920-45

UBC Press

Illustrated throughout with archival photographs, this book examines the photographic and film practice of the Canadian government, the Anglican Church of Canada, and the Hudson’s Bay Company, the three major colonial institutions involved in the arctic and sub-arctic.

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Miranda

The University of Arizona Press

One of the most significant Supreme Court cases in U.S. history has its roots in Arizona and is closely tied to the state's leading legal figures. Miranda has become a household word; now Gary Stuart tells the inside story of this famous case, and with it the legal history of the accused's right to counsel and silence.

Ernesto Miranda was an uneducated Hispanic man arrested in 1963 in connection with a series of sexual assaults, to which he confessed within hours. He was convicted not on the strength of eyewitness testimony or physical evidence but almost entirely because he had incriminated himself without knowing it—and without knowing that he didn't have to. Miranda's lawyers, John P. Frank and John F. Flynn, were among the most prominent in the state, and their work soon focused the entire country on the issue of their client's rights. A 1966 Supreme Court decision held that Miranda's rights had been violated and resulted in the now-famous "Miranda warnings." Stuart personally knows many of the figures involved in Miranda, and here he unravels its complex history, revealing how the defense attorneys created the argument brought before the Court and analyzing the competing societal interests involved in the case. He considers Miranda's aftermath—not only the test cases and ongoing political and legal debate but also what happened to Ernesto Miranda. He then updates the story to the Supreme Court's 2000 Dickerson decision upholding Miranda and considers its implications for cases in the wake of 9/11 and the rights of suspected terrorists. Interviews with 24 individuals directly concerned with the decision—lawyers, judges, and police officers, as well as suspects, scholars, and ordinary citizens—offer observations on the case's impact on law enforcement and on the rights of the accused.

Ten years after the decision in the case that bears his name, Ernesto Miranda was murdered in a knife fight at a Phoenix bar, and his suspected killer was "Mirandized" before confessing to the crime. Miranda: The Story of America's Right to Remain Silent considers the legacy of that case and its fate in the twenty-first century as we face new challenges in the criminal justice system.

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