Collective Insecurity
200 pages, 6 1/4 x 9 1/4
Paperback
Release Date:01 Jan 2004
ISBN:9780774810371
Hardcover
Release Date:31 Aug 2003
ISBN:9780774810364
PDF
Release Date:01 Oct 2007
ISBN:9780774851817
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Collective Insecurity

The Liberian Crisis, Unilateralism, and Global Order

SERIES: Law and Society
UBC Press

Africa's notorious civil wars and seemingly endless conflictsconstitute one of the most intractable threats to global peace andsecurity in the post-Cold War era. This book provides both a superbanalysis of the historical dysfunction of the post-colonial Africanstate generally and, more specifically, a probing critique of thecrisis that resulted in the tragic collapse of Liberia.

Using a historical deconstruction and reconstruction of the theoriesand practice of international law and politics, Ikechi Mgbeojiultimately shows that blame for this endless cycle of violence must belaid at the feet of both the Western powers and African statesthemselves. He further posits that three measures - a reconstructedregime of African statehood, legitimate governance, and reform of theUnited Nations Security Council - are imperatives for the creation of astable African polity. In the post-9/11 era, this holistic andmultilateral approach to collective security remains the world'sbest route to peace and socio-political stability.

Collective Insecurity is a vital addition to the study ofinternational law and will be of interest to students and practitionersof international law and international relations, and those with aninterest in security studies, politics, and African studies.

Collective Insecurity is a vital addition to the study ofinternational law and will be of interest to students and practitionersof international law and international relations, and those with aninterest in security studies, politics, and African studies.

A timely, well written book that will appeal to those interested in Africa—international lawyers, international relations specialists, and others who are concerned about the impact of the “global war on terrorism” on the role of international law and social justice ... there is no question that this is an important book that draws on a wide variety of sources and disciplines to address both an area that has been neglected for far too long in the US (African politics and history) and an issue that is at the forefront of US foreign policy today (the legitimate use of military force internationally). Ronald C. Slye, Seattle University School of Law, Law and Politics Book Review
The book is a significant contribution to the fields of international law and African studies ... [It] provides a basis from which to start to make sense of a vast continent which has been forgotten in its hour of need. It points the way forward and clarifies the difficult historical and intellectual problems that must be comprehended if Africa is to be understood both by Africans as well as outsiders. Director of the Human Rights Center at SUNY Buffalo School of Law and author of Human Rights: A Political and Cultural Critique
Ikechi Mgbeoji is a professor in the Faculty of Law,Osgoode Hall, York University.

Introduction

1 The Myth of African Statehood

2 Collective Security and the Liberian Conflict

3 The Liberian Conflict and the International Law on ForeignIntervention in Domestic Conflicts

4 The UN Charter and the Ratification of the ECOWAS Action by theSecurity Council: Implications for Global Security

5 Reconfiguring Collective Security in Africa

Conclusion

Notes

Bibliography

Index

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