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New and Forthcoming in Environmental Studies
Reshaping Landscape and Community in Canada’s Maritime Marshlands

Against the Tides tells the compelling story of the rehabilitation of the Maritime marshlands, a project that reshaped not only the landscape of the Bay of Fundy region but the communities that depended on it.

Food, Agriculture, and Change in the Holland Marsh

From Dismal Swamp to Smiling Farms reveals how some of the most profitable farmland in Canada has been shaped, and ultimately imperilled, by liberal notions of progress and nature.

Science, Territory, and State Power in Quebec, 1867–1939
By Stéphane Castonguay Foreword by Graeme Wynn Translated by Käthe Roth

The Government of Natural Resources is a revealing look at how science can extend state power through territorial and environmental transformations.

Environment, Energy, and Engineers at the World’s Most Famous Waterfall

Long considered a natural wonder, the world’s most famous waterfall is anything but. Fixing Niagara Falls reveals the engineering and politics behind the transformation of Niagara Falls.

Environmental Policy in Canada's Petro-Provinces

Fossilized reveals how Alberta, Saskatchewan, and Newfoundland and Labrador – blinded by exceptional economic growth from 2005 to 2015 – undermined environmental policies to intensify ecologically detrimental extreme oil extraction.

A Guide for Communities and External Agencies

Based on the experiences of evacuees from seven First Nations communities, this book offers guidance to Indigenous communities and external agencies on how to successfully plan for and carry out wildfire evacuations.

Land Claims Boards, Wildlife Management, and Environmental Regulation

This book is a clear, compelling, and evidence-based assessment of the effectiveness of co-management boards in providing Indigenous peoples with genuine influence over land and wildlife decisions affecting their traditional territories.

People and Landscapes in Transition

This extensively revised edition of Geography of British Columbia teaches students how to think like geographers as it takes them on a journey from the origins of the region’s diverse and unique landscapes to its more recent history as a province being reshaped by the forces of globalization.

Environmental Studies Titles from our Publishing Partners
Deadly Secrets, Corporate Corruption, and One Man’s Search for Justice

Uniting Design, Economics, and Policy

Tens of millions of Americans are at risk from sea level rise, increased tidal flooding, and intensifying storms. A Blueprint for Coastal Adaptation identifies a bold new research and policy agenda and provides implementable options for coastal communities responding to these threats. In this book, coastal adaptation experts present a range of climate adaptation policies that could protect coastal communities against increasing risk, including concrete financing recommendations. Coastal adaptation will not be easy, but it is achievable using varied approaches. A Blueprint for Coastal Adaptation will inspire innovative and cross-disciplinary thinking about coastal policy at the state and local level while providing actionable, realistic policy and planning options for adaptation professionals and policymakers.

Lessons for a Better Future

COVID-19 put a temporary stop to the crisis of overtourism. Yet there is no question that travel will resume; the only question is, when it does, what will it look like?Overtourism: Lessons for a Better Future charts a path toward tourism that is truly sustainable, focusing on the triple bottom line of people, planet, and prosperity. This practical book examines the causes and effects of overtourism before turning to emerging management strategies. Visitor education, traffic planning, and redirection to lesser known sites are among the measures that can protect the economic benefit of tourism without overwhelming local communities. As tourism revives around the world, these innovations will guide government agencies, parks officials, site managers, civic groups, environmental NGOs, tourism operators, and others with a stake in protecting our most iconic places.  

Pollution, Persistence, and Politics

Plastic Legacies brings together scholars from the fields of marine biology, psychology, anthropology, environmental studies, Indigenous studies, and media studies to investigate and address the urgent socio-ecological challenges brought about by plastics.

Touching This Leviathan asks how we might come to know the unknowable—in this case, whales, animals so large yet so elusive, revealing just a sliver of back, a glimpse of a fluke, or a split-second breach before diving away.Whale books often sit within disciplinary silos. Touching This Leviathan starts a conversation among them. Drawing on biology, theology, natural history, literature, and writing studies, Peter Wayne Moe offers a deep dive into the alluring and impalpable mysteries of Earth’s largest mammal.Entertaining, thought-provoking, and swimming with intelligence and wit, Touching is Leviathan is creative nonfiction that gestures toward science and literary criticism as it invites readers into the belly of the whale.

The Human Rights Case Against Fracking and Climate Change

Fracking, the practice of shattering underground rock to release oil and natural gas, is a major driver of climate change. The 300,000 fracking facilities in the US also directly harm the health and livelihoods of people in front-line communities, who are disproportionately poor and people of color. Impacted citizens have for years protested that their rights have been ignored. On May 14, 2018, a respected international human-rights court, the Rome-based Permanent Peoples’ Tribunal, began a week-long hearing on the impacts of fracking and climate change on human and Earth rights. In its advisory opinion, the Tribunal ruled that fracking systematically violates substantive and procedural human rights; that governments are complicit in the rights violations; and that to protect human rights and the climate, the practice of fracking should be banned. The case makes history. It revokes the social license of extreme-extraction industries by connecting environmental destruction to human-rights violations. It affirms that climate change, and the extraction techniques that fuel it, directly violate deeply and broadly accepted moral norms encoded in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights.Bearing Witness maps a promising new direction in the ongoing struggle to protect the planet from climate chaos. It tells the story of this landmark case through carefully curated court materials, including searing eye-witness testimony, groundbreaking legal testimony, and the Tribunal’s advisory opinion. Essays by leading climate writers such as Winona LaDuke, Robin Wall Kimmerer, and Sandra Steingraber and legal experts such as John Knox, Mary Wood, and Anna Grear give context to the controversy. Framing essays by the editors, experts on climate ethics and human rights, demonstrate that a human-rights focus is a powerful, transformative new tool to address the climate crisis.

The Secret Life of Mountain Ecosystems

We all see the largest features of mountain ecosystems—the impressively rugged peaks, the clear blue lakes, and the extensive forests—but each of these readily visible features depends on largely invisible creatures and flows of material and energy. Something Hidden in the Ranges draws on a wide array of scientific research to reveal the complex ecology of Rocky Mountain National Park in Colorado and, by extension, of mountain ecosystems generally. Geologist Ellen Wohl has spent three decades investigating the streams and forests near her home in Colorado. In writing that is free from jargon and easy to understand, she tells the intricate story of how streams provide energy to adjacent forests, how lake sediments record the history of wind-blown pollutants, and how hidden networks of fungi keeps forests healthy. She guides readers through forests at both lower and higher elevations, revealing how trees rely on microbes in the soil, in the forest canopy, and even within individual pine needles to obtain the food they need. Other chapters focus on subalpine lakes, mountain streams, beaver meadows, and alpine tundra. While scientists, students, and scholars will benefit from Wohl’s intimate knowledge of mountain ecosystems, Something Hidden in the Ranges is written for anyone interested in natural or environmental history. It will change the way readers perceive and think about natural landscapes.

A Multidisciplinary Exploration of North American Energy Development

Energy Impacts brings together important new research on site-level social, economic, and behavioral impacts from large-scale energy development.

An Anthology of Environmental Writing

Reaching from Texas to Florida and featuring a diverse array of voices from the past 100 years, this collection of environmental writing about the Gulf South region enriches how we understand the relationship between people and the rapidly changing ecology of the Gulf.

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