History

Showing 191-200 of 826 items.

Paddling to Where I Stand

Agnes Alfred, Qwiqwasutinuxw Noblewoman

UBC Press

A first-hand account of the greatest period of change experienced by the Kwakwaka'wakw people since their first contact with Europeans.

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“Real” Indians and Others

Mixed-Blood Urban Native Peoples and Indigenous Nationhood

UBC Press

A pioneering look at how mixed-blood urban Native people understand their identities and struggle to survive in a world that often fails to recognize them.

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The Red Man's on the Warpath

The Image of the "Indian" and the Second World War

UBC Press

This book explores how wartime symbolism and imagery propelled the “Indian problem” onto the national agenda, and why assimilation remained the goal of post-war Canadian Indian policy – even though the war required that it be rationalized in new ways.

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A Nation of Villages

The University of Arizona Press

During the period 1769-1850, republican national institutions slowly replaced colonial and monarchical rule. This was a turbulent time in rural Mexico. It was a period of political instability marked by violent peasant rebellions that were longer, more violent, and involved more people than those that occurred in the colonial era. ...

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Northern Exposures

Photographing and Filming the Canadian North, 1920-45

UBC Press

Illustrated throughout with archival photographs, this book examines the photographic and film practice of the Canadian government, the Anglican Church of Canada, and the Hudson’s Bay Company, the three major colonial institutions involved in the arctic and sub-arctic.

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Lost Laborers in Colonial California

The University of Arizona Press

Native Americans who populated the various ranchos of Mexican California as laborers are people frequently lost to history. The "rancho period" was a critical time for California Indians, as many were drawn into labor pools for the flourishing ranchos following the 1834 dismantlement of the mission system, but they are practically absent ...

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Miranda

The University of Arizona Press

One of the most significant Supreme Court cases in U.S. history has its roots in Arizona and is closely tied to the state's leading legal figures. Miranda has become a household word; now Gary Stuart tells the inside story of this famous case, and with it the legal history of the accused's right to counsel and silence.

Ernesto Miranda was an uneducated Hispanic man arrested in 1963 in connection with a series of sexual assaults, to which he confessed within hours. He was convicted not on the strength of eyewitness testimony or physical evidence but almost entirely because he had incriminated himself without knowing it—and without knowing that he didn't have to. Miranda's lawyers, John P. Frank and John F. Flynn, were among the most prominent in the state, and their work soon focused the entire country on the issue of their client's rights. A 1966 Supreme Court decision held that Miranda's rights had been violated and resulted in the now-famous "Miranda warnings." Stuart personally knows many of the figures involved in Miranda, and here he unravels its complex history, revealing how the defense attorneys created the argument brought before the Court and analyzing the competing societal interests involved in the case. He considers Miranda's aftermath—not only the test cases and ongoing political and legal debate but also what happened to Ernesto Miranda. He then updates the story to the Supreme Court's 2000 Dickerson decision upholding Miranda and considers its implications for cases in the wake of 9/11 and the rights of suspected terrorists. Interviews with 24 individuals directly concerned with the decision—lawyers, judges, and police officers, as well as suspects, scholars, and ordinary citizens—offer observations on the case's impact on law enforcement and on the rights of the accused.

Ten years after the decision in the case that bears his name, Ernesto Miranda was murdered in a knife fight at a Phoenix bar, and his suspected killer was "Mirandized" before confessing to the crime. Miranda: The Story of America's Right to Remain Silent considers the legacy of that case and its fate in the twenty-first century as we face new challenges in the criminal justice system.

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Fight or Pay

Soldiers' Families in the Great War

UBC Press

In Fight or Pay, Desmond Morton turns his eye to the stories of those who paid in lieu of fighting – the wives, mothers, and families left behind when soldiers went to war.

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Selling British Columbia

Tourism and Consumer Culture, 1890-1970

UBC Press

An entertaining and illustrated account of the development of BC's tourist industry between 1890 and 1970, examining how BC’s history of colonialism was deftly marketed to potential tourists.

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Dominion and the Rising Sun

Canada Encounters Japan, 1929-1941

UBC Press
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