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New and Forthcoming in Indigenous Studies
Ethnography, Colonialism, and the Cannibal Dance

Writing the Hamat̓sa critically surveys more than two centuries worth of published, archival, and oral sources to trace the attempted prohibition, intercultural mediation, and ultimate survival of one of Canada’s most iconic Indigenous ceremonies.

Living Our Present Through the Power of Our Past

Métis Rising brings together a vibrant collection of essays on history, politics, and culture that celebrate the resilience of Métis identity.

Constitutional Rights and Métis Community

Bead by Bead lays bare the failure of judicial doctrine and government policy to address Métis rights, and offers constructive insights on ways to advance reconciliation.

New Directions in Contemporary Métis Studies

In A People and a Nation, the authors, most of whom are themselves Metis, offer readers a set of lenses through which to consider the complexity of historical and contemporary Métis nationhood and peoplehood.

The Untold Story of the Métis of Western Québec

Bois-Brûlés shatters the prevailing orthodoxy that Métis communities are found solely in western Canada by demonstrating that a distinct community emerged in the fur trade frontier of Quebec in the early nineteenth century and persists to this day.

An Ojibway-Anishinabe Vision for the Future

Reframing Manitou Aki (Creator's Land) history from the perspective of the Ojibway-Anishinabe, Our Hearts Are as One Fire shares a vision for the leaders of today and tomorrow.

Five Centuries of Colonization in North America

Making and Breaking Settler Space deftly explores how power and space are organized under settler colonialism in order to uncover decolonization opportunities for Indigenous and settler people alike.

Reflections on Settler Colonialism in Canada

In this beautifully crafted and written volume, Canada’s preeminent historical geographer traces how Canada’s geographical limitations have shaped the nature of its settler societies – from first contacts, to dispossession, to our current age of reconciliation.

Indigenous Miniatures of the Pacific Northwest

So Much More Than Art reveals the fascinating practice of miniaturization in Indigenous Northwest Coast art as a subtle form of communication in the face of oppressive colonization.

Indigenous Activism, Colonial Legacies, and Photographic Heritage

Adjusting the Lens explores and celebrates decolonizing strategies and practices that confront the ways the photographic record of Indigenous peoples has been shaped by the colonial imagination.

Michael Nicoll Yahgulanaas, Art, and the Seriousness of Play

In a gorgeously illustrated exploration of the art of Michael Nicoll Yahgulanaas, Mischief Making demonstrates how playful and punning gestures can shed light on serious subjects.

The Nisg̱a’a Final Agreement and the Challenges of Modern Treaty Relationships

Beyond Rights examines the legal, political, and cultural implications of the ground-breaking process of negotiating the Nisga’a treaty.

Indigenous and Settler Visions of Treaty Making in the Colonies of Vancouver Island and British Columbia

To Share, Not Surrender presents multiple views and lived experience of the treaty-making process and its repercussions in the Colonies of Vancouver Island and British Columbia, and publishes, for the first time, the Vancouver Island Treaties in First Nations languages.

The Settler Colonial Invasion of Kahnawà:ke in Nineteenth-Century Canada

The Laws and the Land, an original and impassioned account of the history of the relationship between Canada and Kahnawà:ke, reveals the clash of settler and Indigenous legal traditions and the imposition of settler colonial law on Indigenous peoples and land.

The Political Economy of Indigenous Land Reform

Inalienable Properties explores the contrasting approaches taken by local leaders to property rights and development in four Indigenous communities.

The Guerin Case and Aboriginal Law

This thoughtful and engaging examination of the Guerin case shows how it changed the relationship between governments and Indigenous peoples from one of wardship to one based on legal rights.

Reimagining Public Inquiries in Canada

Reconciling Truths is a forthright examination of commissions of inquiry that demonstrates the need for astute leadership and an engaging process if they are to lead to meaningful change.

Literature, Art, and the Politics of Reconciliation in Canada

The Theatre of Regret reveals the role that Indigenous and allied literatures play in challenging state-centred discourses of reconciliation in Canada.

How Violence Persists in Settler Colonial Society

Invested Indifference exposes the tenacity of violence against Indigenous people, arguing that some lives are made to matter – or not – depending on their relation to the settler-colonial nation state.

A Guide for Communities and External Agencies

Based on the experiences of evacuees from seven First Nations communities, this book offers guidance to Indigenous communities and external agencies on how to successfully plan for and carry out wildfire evacuations.

Land Claims Boards, Wildlife Management, and Environmental Regulation

This book is a clear, compelling, and evidence-based assessment of the effectiveness of co-management boards in providing Indigenous peoples with genuine influence over land and wildlife decisions affecting their traditional territories.

Legacies of Colonialism in Museum Documentation

In examining how the technologies of museum bureaucracy – the ledger book, the card catalogue, the database – operate through a colonial lens, Cataloguing Culture shines a light on access to and the return of Indigenous cultural heritage.

A Trapline Memoir

The Shoe Boy is an evocative exploration of Indigenous identity and connection to the land, expressed in guise of a unique coming-of-age memoir set on a trapline in northern Quebec.

Indigenous Studies Titles from our Publishing Partners
An Anthology of Navajo Literature

The Diné Reader: An Anthology of Navajo Literature is a comprehensive collection of creative works by Diné poets and writers. This anthology is the first of its kind.

Deep Time and Indigenous Knowledges in North America

Decolonizing “Prehistory” critically examines and challenges the paradoxical role that modern historical-archaeological scholarship plays in adding legitimacy to, but also delegitimizing, contemporary colonialist practices. Using an interdisciplinary approach, this volume empowers Indigenous voices and offers a nuanced understanding of the American deep past.

Feminist Activist Research in Heightened States of Injustice

Indigenous Women and Violence offers an intimate view of how settler colonialism and other structural forms of power and inequality created accumulated violences in the lives of Indigenous women. The chapters in this book are engaged, feminist, collaborative, and activism focused, conveying powerful messages about the resilience of Indigenous women in the face of violence and systemic oppression.

A History

Becoming Hopi is a comprehensive look at the history of the people of the Hopi Mesas as it has never been told before. The product of more than fifteen years of collaboration between tribal and academic scholars, this volume presents groundbreaking research demonstrating that the Hopi Mesas are among the great centers of the Pueblo world.  

Restoring Rhetorical Relations at the Carlisle Indian School

Writing Their Bodies analyzes pedagogical philosophies and curricular materials through the perspective of written and visual student texts created during the school’s first three-year term.

Indigenous Persistence from Hawaiʻi to Kahiki

A Navajo Honors the Long Walk

Both exhilarating and punishing, Send A Runner tells the story of a Navajo family using the power of running to honor their ancestors and the power of history to explain why the Long Walk happened.

The Global Ascendency of Social Media Activism

Indigenous Peoples Rise Up: The Global Ascendency of Social Media Activism illustrates the impact of social media in expanding the nature of Indigenous communities and social movements. Social media has bridged distance, time, and nation states to mobilize Indigenous peoples to build coalitions across the globe and to stand in solidarity with one another. Including examples like Idle No More in Canada, Australian Recognise!, and social media campaigns to maintain Maori language, Indigenous Peoples Rise Up serves as one of the first studies of Indigenous social media use and activism.   

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