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New and Forthcoming in Indigenous Studies
The Ipperwash Story

In this disquieting story of broken promises and thwarted justice, the Anishinaabe of Stoney Point tell of the long struggle to reclaim their ancestral homeland, both before and after the Ipperwash crisis.

Nehiyawak Narratives

Upholding Indigenous Economic Relationships investigates Indigenous economic theories and relationships through the lenses of settler colonial exploitation and Indigenous resurgence.

Aboriginal Title and the Claim of British Columbia

Unstable Properties convincingly argues that the so-called land question in British Columbia cannot be resolved without understanding the fundamentally unstable ideological foundation of land and title arrangements on which the province rests.

Illuminating Indigenous Presence through Art and Story

In Braided Learning, Lenape-Potawatomi educator Susan Dion inspires engagement with the histories and perspectives of Indigenous peoples, cultivating capacities for understanding, attunement, and respect.

Ethnography, Colonialism, and the Cannibal Dance

Writing the Hamat̓sa critically surveys more than two centuries worth of published, archival, and oral sources to trace the attempted prohibition, intercultural mediation, and ultimate survival of one of Canada’s most iconic Indigenous ceremonies.

Living Our Present Through the Power of Our Past

Métis Rising brings together a vibrant collection of essays on history, politics, and culture that celebrate the resilience of Métis identity.

Constitutional Rights and Métis Community

Bead by Bead lays bare the failure of judicial doctrine and government policy to address Métis rights, and offers constructive insights on ways to advance reconciliation.

New Directions in Contemporary Métis Studies

In A People and a Nation, the authors, most of whom are themselves Metis, offer readers a set of lenses through which to consider the complexity of historical and contemporary Métis nationhood and peoplehood.

An Ojibway-Anishinabe Vision for the Future

Reframing Manitou Aki (Creator's Land) history from the perspective of the Ojibway-Anishinabe, Our Hearts Are as One Fire shares a vision for the leaders of today and tomorrow.

Five Centuries of Colonization in North America

Making and Breaking Settler Space deftly explores how power and space are organized under settler colonialism in order to uncover decolonization opportunities for Indigenous and settler people alike.

Reflections on Settler Colonialism in Canada

In this beautifully crafted and written volume, Canada’s preeminent historical geographer traces how Canada’s geographical limitations have shaped the nature of its settler societies – from first contacts, to dispossession, to our current age of reconciliation.

Indigenous Miniatures of the Pacific Northwest

So Much More Than Art reveals the fascinating practice of miniaturization in Indigenous Northwest Coast art as a subtle form of communication in the face of oppressive colonization.

Indigenous Activism, Colonial Legacies, and Photographic Heritage

Adjusting the Lens explores and celebrates decolonizing strategies and practices that confront the ways the photographic record of Indigenous peoples has been shaped by the colonial imagination.

Michael Nicoll Yahgulanaas, Art, and the Seriousness of Play

In a gorgeously illustrated exploration of the art of Michael Nicoll Yahgulanaas, Mischief Making demonstrates how playful and punning gestures can shed light on serious subjects.

The Nisg̱a’a Final Agreement and the Challenges of Modern Treaty Relationships

Beyond Rights examines the legal, political, and cultural implications of the groundbreaking process of negotiating the Nisga’a treaty.

Indigenous and Settler Visions of Treaty Making in the Colonies of Vancouver Island and British Columbia

To Share, Not Surrender presents multiple views and lived experience of the treaty-making process and its repercussions in the Colonies of Vancouver Island and British Columbia, and publishes, for the first time, the Vancouver Island Treaties in First Nations languages.

The Settler Colonial Invasion of Kahnawà:ke in Nineteenth-Century Canada

The Laws and the Land, an original and impassioned account of the history of the relationship between Canada and Kahnawà:ke, reveals the clash of settler and Indigenous legal traditions and the imposition of settler colonial law on Indigenous peoples and land.

The Political Economy of Indigenous Land Reform

Inalienable Properties explores the contrasting approaches taken by local leaders to property rights and development in four Indigenous communities.

Reimagining Public Inquiries in Canada

Reconciling Truths is a forthright examination of commissions of inquiry that demonstrates the need for astute leadership and an engaging process if they are to lead to meaningful change.

Literature, Art, and the Politics of Reconciliation in Canada

The Theatre of Regret reveals the role that Indigenous and allied literatures play in challenging state-centred discourses of reconciliation in Canada.

How Violence Persists in Settler Colonial Society

Invested Indifference exposes the tenacity of violence against Indigenous people, arguing that some lives are made to matter – or not – depending on their relation to the settler-colonial nation state.

A Guide for Communities and External Agencies

Based on the experiences of evacuees from seven First Nations communities, this book offers guidance to Indigenous communities and external agencies on how to successfully plan for and carry out wildfire evacuations.

Indigenous Studies Titles from our Publishing Partners
A Cherokee Community's Resistance to the Trail of Tears in North Carolina

The remarkable story of a North Carolina Cherokee community who avoided forced removal on the Trail of Tears  

Diné Creative Works from the Intermountain Indian School

Returning Home features and contextualizes the creative works of Diné (Navajo) boarding school students at the Intermountain Indian School, which was the largest federal Indian boarding school between 1950 and 1984. Diné student art and poetry reveal ways that boarding school students sustained and contributed to Indigenous cultures and communities despite assimilationist agendas and pressures.

Native American Rhetoric is the first book to explore rhetorical traditions from within individual Native communities and Native languages.

Indios Fronterizos and Mexican Independence

Explores social and cultural transformations among the indigenous communities of western Mexico, especially the indios fronterizos (Frontier Indians), preceding and during the struggle for independence

Indigeneity, Aesthetics, and Decolonization

For the first time, Navigating CHamoru Poetry focuses on Indigenous CHamoru (Chamorro) poetry from the Pacific Island of Guåhan (Guam). In this book, poet and scholar Craig Santos Perez navigates the complex relationship between CHamoru poetry, cultural identity, decolonial politics, diasporic migrations, and native aesthetics.

This publication is supported by a generous grant from the Confederated Tribes of Grand Ronde through their Cultural Resources Publication Sponsorship Program Instead of discovering a land blanketed by dense forests, early explorers of the Pacific Northwest encountered a varied landscape including open woods, meadows, and prairies. Far from a pristine wilderness, much of the Northwest was actively managed and shaped by the hands of its Native American inhabitants. Their primary tool was fire. This volume takes an interdisciplinary approach to one of the most important issues concerning Native Americans and their relationship to the land. Over more than 10,000 years, Native Americans in the Northwest learned the intricacies of their local environments and how to use fire to create desired effects, mostly in the quest for food. Drawing on historical journals, Native American informants, and ethnobotanical and forestry studies, this book’s contributors describe local patterns of fire use in eight ecoregions, representing all parts of the Native Northwest, from southwest Oregon to British Columbia and from Puget Sound to the Northern Rockies. Their essays provide glimpses into a unique understanding of the environment, one that draws on traditional ecological knowledge. Together, these writings also offer historical perspective on the contemporary debate over “prescribed burning” and management of public lands. This updated edition includes a foreword by Frank K. Lake and a new epilogue by editor Robert T. Boyd. Contributors include Stephen Arno, Stephen Barrett, Theresa Ferguson, David French, Eugene Hunn, Leslie Johnson, Jeff LaLande, Estella Leopold, Henry Lewis, Helen H. Norton, Reg Pullen, William Robbins, John Ross, Nancy Turner, and Richard White.  

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