Oregon State University Press

For fifty years, Oregon State University Press has been publishing exceptional books about the Pacific Northwest—its people and landscapes, its flora and fauna, its history and cultural heritage. The Press has played a vital role in the region’s literary life, providing readers with a better understanding of what it means to be an Oregonian. Today, Oregon State University Press publishes distinguished books in several academic areas from environmental history and natural resource management to indigenous studies.

Showing 21-30 of 381 items.

Struggle on the North Santiam

Power and Community on the Margins of the American West

Oregon State University Press

A history or Oregon's North Santiam Canyon, from interaction between Native and non-Native peoples and railroad development and land fraud in the nineteenth century, to changing fortunes in the timber industry and questions about economic and environmental sustainability into the twenty-first century.

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Abalone

The Remarkable History and Uncertain Future of California's Iconic Shellfish

Oregon State University Press

Explores the natural history of the abalone and its imperiled future, focusing on a mix of issues, from the simple and expected (over-harvesting) to the more complex (fundamental scientific misunderstandings).

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Collected Poems of Hazel Hall, The

By Hazel Hall; Edited by John Witte; Afterword by Anita Helle
Oregon State University Press

During the short span of her career, Hazel Hall became one of the West's outstanding literary figures, a poet whose fierce, crystalline verse was frequently compared with that of Emily Dickinson. Confined to a wheelchair since childhood, Hall's writings convey the dark undertones of the lives of working women in the early twentieth century, while bringing into focus her own private, reclusive life—her limited mobility, her isolation and loneliness, and her gifts with needlework and words.

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Facing the World

Defense Spending and International Trade in the Pacific Northwest Since World War II

Oregon State University Press

An examination of select federal and state-level politicians in the Pacific Northwest in the post-World War II era, "Facing the World" contends that individuals, including Henry Jackson, Tom Foley, Mark Hatfield, and Vic Atiyeh, working with local partners, secured the economic expansion of the Pacific Northwest through greater global outreach and embrace of the federal national security doctrine that took hold during the Cold War.

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The Collected Poems of Ada Hastings Hedges

Oregon State University Press

Ada Hastings Hedges was one of Oregon’s foremost poets of the mid-twentieth century. This book brings together her known poems, including a complete annotated reprint of her famous “Desert Poems” of 1930.

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Remote

Finding Home in the Bitterroots

Oregon State University Press

The story of one woman’s journey into the Selway-Bitterroot Wilderness of Idaho and Montana to investigate the disappearance of her friend and discover the truth about her family.

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Trees to Know in Oregon and Washington

Oregon State University Press

For 70 years, people have turned to one book to learn about Northwest trees: Trees to Know in Oregon. This new edition, retitled Trees to Know in Oregon and Washington, expands its scope to cover more territory and include more trees.
 
The book was first published in 1950. Charles R. Ross, an Oregon State University Extension forester, wanted to introduce readers to the towering giants in their backyards. Since then, Edward C. Jensen has stewarded the publication through several more editions. This edition features several rare species native to southwest Oregon. It also updates scientific names and adds a new section on how Northwest forests are likely to be affected by changing climates.

Since its initial publication, Trees to Know has become a mainstay for students, gardeners, small woodland owners and visitors to the Pacific Northwest. Along with all the details on native conifers, broadleaves, and more than 50 ornamental trees, readers will find:

  • More than 400 full-color photos and 70 maps depicting habitat, range and forest type.
  • Easy-to-follow identification keys.
  • Handy guides to help distinguish one variety from another.
  • The story of Northwest forests — past, present and future.

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Black Woman in Green

Gloria Brown and the Unmarked Trail to Forest Service Leadership

Oregon State University Press

An urban African American woman rises from secretary to leader in the USDA Forest Service of the twentieth century West. Along the way, she faces personal and agency challenges to become the first black female forest supervisor in the United States.

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The Other Oregon

People, Environment, and History East of the Cascades

Oregon State University Press

Explores the social and natural history of eastern Oregon, including central Oregon.

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Listening at Outlook Creek

Nature in Spiritual Practice

Oregon State University Press

Explores the tenuous character of the human relationship to the natural world in the twenty first century, arguing that contact with specific places is necessary for fostering a sense of meaning and fulfillment in today’s high-tech world.

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