Oregon State University Press

For fifty years, Oregon State University Press has been publishing exceptional books about the Pacific Northwest—its people and landscapes, its flora and fauna, its history and cultural heritage. The Press has played a vital role in the region’s literary life, providing readers with a better understanding of what it means to be an Oregonian. Today, Oregon State University Press publishes distinguished books in several academic areas from environmental history and natural resource management to indigenous studies.

Showing 321-360 of 389 items.

Speaking for the River

Confronting Pollution on the Willamette, 1920s-1970s

Oregon State University Press

Speaking for the River is the first book-length study of Willamette River clean-up efforts from the 1920s through the 1970s. These efforts centered on a struggle between abatement advocates and the two primary polluters in the watershed, the City of Portland and the pulp and paper industry.

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Homing Instincts

Oregon State University Press

Homing Instincts is a collection of personal essays that explores the ways we define “home” at different stages of our lives. Based on pivotal moments in the author’s life in New York City and Oregon, Homing Instincts bridges the gap between where we are and the stories we tell ourselves about where we think we belong.

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Penguins in the Desert

Oregon State University Press

Every year, hundreds of thousands of Magellanic penguins gather to breed at Punta Tombo, Argentina, along a windswept edge of the Patagonian desert, and for more than three decades, biologist Dee Boersma has joined them. Penguins in the Desert follows both the penguins and Boersma through a season of their remarkable lives. 

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Kaiaulu

Gathering Tides

Oregon State University Press

This book shares stories of Hawaiian fishing families on the rural north east shore of island of Kauaʻi, a place many visit but few really see, inviting readers to think about how we all can be connected to and by place, along with the responsibilities this connection carries.  This book offers teachings for living in conscious relationships with the natural world, without letting our desire for connection devour the places we love and the communities who are their keepers.
 

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All Coyote's Children

Oregon State University Press

Annie and her son Riley are devastated by the loss of Riley’s father Jack, who has disappeared into an Eastern Oregon wilderness. Together with their Native and non-Native neighbors on the Umatilla Indian Reservation, they uncover the stories that help them solve the mystery of Jack’s disappearance as they become part of this community.
 

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The Troubled Life of Peter Burnett

Oregon Pioneer and First Governor of California

Oregon State University Press

Peter Burnett, Oregon pioneer and governor of California, had one of the most impressive resumes of any early leaders in the American West, yet failed at most of his pursuits.  A former slaveholder, he could never seem to get beyond his single-minded goal of banning blacks and other minorities from the West.
 

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Beginner's Luck

Dispatches from the Klamath Mountains

Oregon State University Press

A clueless big-city guy, dropped out from newspaper work, ends up at a new hippie commune in the mountains in the late 1960s, but his luck holds. As he falls in love with the place, he moves into the local community, where people have a checkered opinion of hippies, but it’s the kind of place where people help each other out, even if they don’t always agree.
 

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Words Marked by a Place

Local Histories in Central Oregon

Oregon State University Press

Words Marked by a Place is a book of interconnected essays engaging from different angles the history and lore of Central Oregon, and reflecting on and exemplifying the theory and practice of local history.

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Beyond the Rebel Girl

Women and the Industrial Workers of the World in the Pacific Northwest, 1905-1924

Oregon State University Press

Beyond the Rebel Girl is a study of the women associated with the Industrial Workers of the World in the states of Oregon and Washington, from the time of the union’s founding in 1905 until 1924. Many women were drawn to the IWW for its radical vision and inclusionary policies. The union offered women an avenue for activism that did not focus primarily on the fight for suffrage. While female Wobblies were in favor of suffrage, they believed that organization in the workplace was the only way to true emancipation.

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Son of Amity

Oregon State University Press
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Sagebrush Collaboration

How Harney County Defeated the Takeover of the Malheur Wildlife Refuge

Oregon State University Press

Sagebrush Collaboration examines the militia occupation of Harney County, Oregon, and the takeover of the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge in 2016. The book concludes that the militants failed in their objectives in large part because Harney County’s citizens invested decades in building the capacity to collaboratively solve the very problems the militia claimed justified an anti-federal government revolution.
 

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A Deadly Wind

The 1962 Columbus Day Storm

Oregon State University Press

A Deadly Wind is a deeply researched historical account of the most powerful non-tropical windstorm to ever strike the West Coast: The Columbus Day Storm of October 12, 1962, which plowed a path of destruction from the Bay Area to British Columbia. Veteran journalist John Dodge tell stories of tragedy and heroism, loss and resilience, while drawing connections to climate science and more contemporary calamities, such as Superstorm Sandy.
 

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Ellie's Strand

Exploring the Edge of the Pacific

By M. L. Herring; From an idea by Judith L. Li
Oregon State University Press
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Wild Migrations

Atlas of Wyoming's Ungulates

Oregon State University Press

The migrations of Wyoming’s hooved mammals—mule deer, pronghorn, elk, and moose—between their seasonal ranges are some of the longest and most noteworthy migrations on the North American continent. Wild Migrations presents the previously untold story of these migrations, combining wildlife science and cartography. Facing pages cover more than 50 migration topics, ranging from ecology to conservation and management, enriched by visually stunning graphics and maps, and an introductory essay by Emilene Ostlind.
 

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Raw Material

Working Wool in the West

Oregon State University Press
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Salmon is Everything

Community-Based Theatre in the Klamath Watershed

Oregon State University Press

First published in 2014, Salmon Is Everything explores a devastating fish kill on the Klamath River by way of a dramatic play (which forms the basis of the book) and Indigenous commentary on that play. It is a unique interdisciplinary resource for high school and college level courses in environmental studies, Native American studies, and theatre arts education. New materials in this second edition include additional essays by Native faculty and actors, an updated introduction by the author, minor textual corrections throughout, and a new online resource guide.

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Giving Back

Research and Reciprocity in Indigenous Settings

Edited by R. D. K. Herman
Oregon State University Press

This book addresses the critical question of reciprocity in the research process, especially (though not exclusively) in regard to working with Indigenous Communities.  This transdisciplinary collection is edited by geographer R.D.K. Herman of the Smithsonian National Museum of the American Indian, and includes essays by a wide variety of international practitioners at various stages of their careers, from several different countries.

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Governing Oregon

Continuity and Change

Oregon State University Press

Governing Oregon presents a broad and comprehensive picture of Oregon government and politics as we approach the start of the third decade of the twenty-first century, shedding light on the profound changes that have remade Oregon politics in recent years. The book also seeks to make it clear that much has also remained the same. The editors of this collection have relied upon leading scholars from six different Oregon universities, current and former state leaders in Oregon’s executive and judicial branches, and individuals involved in tribal government and policymaking to tell the ongoing story of government in Oregon.
 

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The Eclipse I Call Father

Essays on Absence

Oregon State University Press

In The Eclipse I Call Father: Essays on Absence, David Axelrod recalls a balmy night in May 1970 when he vowed to allow no one and nothing he loves to pass from this life without praise, even if it meant praising the most bewildering losses. In each of these fourteen essays Axelrod delivers on that vow as he ranges across topics as diverse as marriage, Japanese poetry, Craftsman design, Old English riddles, racism, extinction, fatherhood, mountaineering, predatory mega-fauna, street fighting, trains, the Great Depression, and the effects of climate change—accretions of absence that haunt the writer and will likewise haunt readers.
 

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Same River Twice

The Politics of Dam Removal and River Restoration

Oregon State University Press

Dam removal wasn’t a realistic option in the twentieth century, and people who suggested it were dismissed as fringe environmentalists. Over the past twenty years, dam removal has become increasingly common, with dozens of removals now taking place each year in the US. Same River Twice tells the stories of three major Northwestern dam removals – the politics, people, hopes, and fears that shaped three rivers and their communities. Brewitt begins each story with the dam’s construction, shows how its critics gained power, details the conflicts and controversies of removal, and explores the aftermath as the river re-established itself.
 

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Edge of Awe

Experiences of the Malheur-Steens Country

Edited by Alan L. Contreras; Illustrated by Ursula K. LeGuin; Introduction by William Kittredge
Oregon State University Press

 
With a foreword by William Kittredge and line drawings by Ursula K. LeGuin, this literary anthology gathers together personal impressions of the Malheur-Steens region of Oregon, known for its birding opportunities, its natural beauty and remoteness, and, more recently, for the 2016 armed takeover of the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge. Contributors include biologists, students, tourists, birders, local residents, and native Paiute, thus reflecting the perspectives of visitors, original inhabitants, and current residents. Anyone who has visited the area or plans to do so, and anyone with an interest in the region, will find inspiration in this literary companion.
 

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Northwest Voices

Language and Culture in the Pacific Northwest

Edited by Kristin Denham
Oregon State University Press

The Pacific Northwest has long been a linguistically-rich area, yet few books are devoted its linguistic heritage. The essays collected in Northwest Voices examine the historical background of the Pacific Northwest, the contributions of Indigenous languages, the regional legacy of English, and the relationship between our perceptions of people and the languages they speak. The Pacific Northwest has had a surprising number of influences on the English language, and a great number of other languages have left their mark. Individual essays examine linguistic diversity, explore the origins and use of place names, and detail efforts to revive indigenous languages.
 

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Interviewing

The Oregon Method

Edited by Peter Laufer, with John Russial
Oregon State University Press

A collection of practical and analytical essays from more than three dozen professional interviewers, scholars and teachers. This revised and expanded second edition of the popular professional tool features a new foreword and a dozen new chapters designed to aid journalists navigating the “fake news” and “enemy of the people” contemporary media landscape. The book’s chapters take focused looks at a wide variety of issues, including interview ethics, the sanctity of quotes, interviewing in the virtual world, negotiating identity and building rapport. The art of the interview has been taught at the University of Oregon School of Journalism and Communication for generations. This foundational text binds those years of experience into a collection of vibrant essays designed to train novices and invigorate old hands.

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Field Guide to the Grasses of Oregon and Washington

Oregon State University Press

Field Guide to the Grasses of Oregon and Washington is an illustrated guide to all 365 species, subspecies, and varieties of grasses—both native and introduced—that grow wild in Oregon and Washington. It also has broad applicability in neighboring states and provinces. Grasses are important functional components in a variety of ecosystems and are highly valued for habitat restoration in ecosystems ranging from wetlands to deserts, and from sea level to alpine. They are important weeds and are also cultivated as ornamental plants.

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Ricky in the City

Where the Wildlife Live

Oregon State University Press

With the help of new friends, Ricky and Ellie discover a fascinating variety of wildlife and  habitats during their weekend visit to the city of Portland. As young citizen scientists they use their observations to map out wildlife connections across the city while they make contributions to regional databases.

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Sporting Oregon

A Pictorial History of Early Oregon Sports

By Brian S. Campf; Foreword by Carl Abbott; Afterword by John T. Hawk
Oregon State University Press

For thirty years, Brian Campf collected vintage photographs and ephemera related to Oregon sports. Sporting Oregon includes more than three hundred images that offer an overview of the first fifty years of organized sports in the state, primarily baseball, football, and basketball, but also such pastimes as horse racing, track, hockey, tennis, and cricket.

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Catch and Release

An Oregon Life in Politics

Oregon State University Press

Personal memoir of Les AuCoin, member of the US House of Representatives from Oregon's 1st Congressional District from 1975-1993.

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The Mountains of Paris

How Awe and Wonder Rewrote My Life

Oregon State University Press
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Persistent Callings

Seasons of Work and Identity on the Oregon Coast

Oregon State University Press

Using the cultural history of Oregon’s Nestucca Valley as a case study, Taylor illustrates the wisdom of seasonal labor, the complex relationships between work and identity, and the resilience of rural economics across a century of almost continual change.

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Listening at Lookout Creek

Nature in Spiritual Practice

Oregon State University Press

The author, a professor of religious studies and environmental philosophy, wonders if it is possible to rediscover a deep sense of connection with the natural world, and whether it can be done in just ten days.

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A Generous Nature

Lives Transformed by Oregon

Oregon State University Press

In homage to the actists and philanthropists whose individual visions helped to shape and preserve Oregon's natural treasures for future generations, A Generous Nature presents 21 biographical profiles of twentieth-century conservation leaders.

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The Other Oregon

People, Environment, and History East of the Cascades

Oregon State University Press

Explores the social and natural history of eastern Oregon, including central Oregon.

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Black Woman in Green

Gloria Brown and the Unmarked Trail to Forest Service Leadership

Oregon State University Press

An urban African American woman rises from secretary to leader in the USDA Forest Service of the twentieth century West. Along the way, she faces personal and agency challenges to become the first black female forest supervisor in the United States.

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Trees to Know in Oregon and Washington

Oregon State University Press

For 70 years, people have turned to one book to learn about Northwest trees: Trees to Know in Oregon. This new edition, retitled Trees to Know in Oregon and Washington, expands its scope to cover more territory and include more trees.
 
The book was first published in 1950. Charles R. Ross, an Oregon State University Extension forester, wanted to introduce readers to the towering giants in their backyards. Since then, Edward C. Jensen has stewarded the publication through several more editions. This edition features several rare species native to southwest Oregon. It also updates scientific names and adds a new section on how Northwest forests are likely to be affected by changing climates.

Since its initial publication, Trees to Know has become a mainstay for students, gardeners, small woodland owners and visitors to the Pacific Northwest. Along with all the details on native conifers, broadleaves, and more than 50 ornamental trees, readers will find:

  • More than 400 full-color photos and 70 maps depicting habitat, range and forest type.
  • Easy-to-follow identification keys.
  • Handy guides to help distinguish one variety from another.
  • The story of Northwest forests — past, present and future.

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Remote

Finding Home in the Bitterroots

Oregon State University Press

The story of one woman’s journey into the Selway-Bitterroot Wilderness of Idaho and Montana to investigate the disappearance of her friend and discover the truth about her family.

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Facing the World

Defense Spending and International Trade in the Pacific Northwest Since World War II

Oregon State University Press

An examination of select federal and state-level politicians in the Pacific Northwest in the post-World War II era, "Facing the World" contends that individuals, including Henry Jackson, Tom Foley, Mark Hatfield, and Vic Atiyeh, working with local partners, secured the economic expansion of the Pacific Northwest through greater global outreach and embrace of the federal national security doctrine that took hold during the Cold War.

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The Collected Poems of Ada Hastings Hedges

Oregon State University Press

Ada Hastings Hedges was one of Oregon’s foremost poets of the mid-twentieth century. This book brings together her known poems, including a complete annotated reprint of her famous “Desert Poems” of 1930.

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Collected Poems of Hazel Hall, The

By Hazel Hall; Edited by John Witte; Afterword by Anita Helle
Oregon State University Press

During the short span of her career, Hazel Hall became one of the West's outstanding literary figures, a poet whose fierce, crystalline verse was frequently compared with that of Emily Dickinson. Confined to a wheelchair since childhood, Hall's writings convey the dark undertones of the lives of working women in the early twentieth century, while bringing into focus her own private, reclusive life—her limited mobility, her isolation and loneliness, and her gifts with needlework and words.

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Abalone

The Remarkable History and Uncertain Future of California's Iconic Shellfish

Oregon State University Press

Explores the natural history of the abalone and its imperiled future, focusing on a mix of issues, from the simple and expected (over-harvesting) to the more complex (fundamental scientific misunderstandings).

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Struggle on the North Santiam

Power and Community on the Margins of the American West

Oregon State University Press

A history or Oregon's North Santiam Canyon, from interaction between Native and non-Native peoples and railroad development and land fraud in the nineteenth century, to changing fortunes in the timber industry and questions about economic and environmental sustainability into the twenty-first century.

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