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The University of Arizona Press is the premier publisher of academic, regional, and literary works in the state of Arizona. They disseminate ideas and knowledge of lasting value that enrich understanding, inspire curiosity, and enlighten readers. They advance the University of Arizona’s mission by connecting scholarship and creative expression to readers worldwide.

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Michael Chiago

O’odham Lifeways Through Art

The University of Arizona Press

O’odham artist Michael Chiago Sr.’s paintings provide a window into the lifeways of the O’odham people. This book offers a rich account of how Tohono O’odham and Akimel O’odham live in the Sonoran Desert now and in the recent past.

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Mineralogy of Arizona, Fourth Edition

The University of Arizona Press

This is most comprehensive book yet to describe the minerals known to occur in Arizona. It presents a framework of Arizona’s mineralogy and a set of mineral district maps that can help identify new mineral occurrences. A must-have resource for anyone interested in Arizona minerals, gemstones, fluorescent minerals, and geology.

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LGBTQ Politics in Nicaragua

Revolution, Dictatorship, and Social Movements

The University of Arizona Press

LGBTQ Politics in Nicaragua provides the previously untold history of the LGBTQ community’s emergence as political actors—from revolutionary guerillas to civil rights activists.

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Pachamama Politics

Campesino Water Defenders and the Anti-Mining Movement in Andean Ecuador

The University of Arizona Press

Pachamama Politics examines how campesinos came to defend their community water sources from gold mining upstream and explains why Ecuador’s “pink tide” government came under fire by Indigenous and environmental rights activists.

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The Maya Art of Speaking Writing

Remediating Indigenous Orality in the Digital Age

The University of Arizona Press

Challenging the distinctions between “old” and “new” media and narratives about the deprecation of orality in favor of inscribed forms, The Maya Art of Speaking Writing draws from Maya concepts of tz’ib’ (recorded knowledge) and tzij, choloj, and ch’owen (orality) to look at expressive work across media and languages.

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Finding Right Relations

Quakers, Native Americans, and Settler Colonialism

The University of Arizona Press

Colonialism has the power to corrupt. This important new work argues that even the early Quakers, who had a belief system rooted in social justice, committed structural and cultural violence against their Indigenous neighbors.

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A New Deal for Navajo Weaving

Reform and Revival of Diné Textiles

The University of Arizona Press

A New Deal for Navajo Weaving provides a history of early to mid-twentieth-century Diné weaving projects by non-Natives who sought to improve the quality and marketability of Diné weaving but in so doing failed to understand the cultural significance of weaving and its role in the lives of Diné women.

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Postindian Aesthetics

Affirming Indigenous Literary Sovereignty

The University of Arizona Press

Postindian Aesthetics is a collection of critical, cutting-edge essays on a new generation of Indigenous writers who are creatively and powerfully contributing to a thriving Indigenous literary canon that is redefining the parameters of Indigenous literary aesthetics.

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Latinx Teens

U.S. Popular Culture on the Page, Stage, and Screen

The University of Arizona Press

Latinx Teens examines how Latinx teenagers influence twenty-first-century U.S. popular culture. The book explores the diverse ways that contemporary mainstream film, television, theater, and young adult literature invokes, constructs, and interprets adolescent Latinidad.

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A Love Letter to This Bridge Called My Back

The University of Arizona Press

In 1981, Chicana feminist intellectuals Cherríe Moraga and Gloria Anzaldúa published what would become a foundational legacy for generations of feminist women of color—the seminal This Bridge Called My Back: Writings by Radical Women of Color. To celebrate and honor this important work, editors gloria j. wilson, Joni B. Acuff, and Amelia M. Kraehe offer new generations A Love Letter to This Bridge Called My Back.

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Latinx TV in the Twenty-First Century

The University of Arizona Press

Latinx TV in the Twenty-First Century offers an expansive and critical look at contemporary television by and about U.S. Latinx communities. This volume unpacks the negative implications of older representation and celebrates the progress of new representation, all while recognizing that television still has a long way to go.

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The Greater San Rafael Swell

Honoring Tradition and Preserving Storied Lands

The University of Arizona Press

This book offers the story of how citizens of a small county in the rural West – Emery County, Utah—resolved perhaps the most volatile issue in the region – the future of public lands.
 

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Indigenous Archaeology in the Philippines

Decolonizing Ifugao History

The University of Arizona Press

This book illustrates how descendant communities can take control of their history and heritage through active collaboration with archaeologists. Drawing on the Philippine Cordilleran experiences, Indigenous Archaeology in the Philippines discusses how changing historical narratives help empower peoples who are traditionally ignored in national histories.

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Transforming Diné Education

Innovations in Pedagogy and Practice

The University of Arizona Press

Transforming Diné Education honors the perspectives and voices of Diné educators in culturally relevant education, special education, Diné language revitalization, well-being, tribal sovereignty, self-determination in Diné education, and university-tribal-community partnerships. The contributors offer stories about Diné resilience, resistance, and survival by articulating a Diné-centered pedagogy and politics for future generations.

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American Indian Studies

Native PhD Graduates Gift Their Stories

The University of Arizona Press

Native American doctoral graduates of American Indian Studies (AIS) at the University of Arizona, the first AIS program in the United States to offer a PhD, gift their stories. The Native PhD recipients share their journeys of pursuing and earning the doctorate, and its impact on their lives and communities.

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Barger Gulch

A Folsom Campsite in the Rocky Mountains

The University of Arizona Press

This monograph summarizes findings from nine seasons of excavation at Barger Gulch Locality B, a Folsom campsite in the Colorado Rocky Mountains. Archaeologist Todd A. Surovell explains the spatial organization of the camp and the social organization of the people who lived there.

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The Community-Based PhD

Complexities and Triumphs of Conducting CBPR

The University of Arizona Press

This volume explores the complex and nuanced experience of doing community-based research as a graduate student. Contributors from a range of scholarly disciplines share their experiences with CBPR in the arts, humanities, social sciences, public health, and STEM fields.

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Birds of the Sun

Macaws and People in the U.S. Southwest and Mexican Northwest

The University of Arizona Press

The multiple vivid colors of scarlet macaws and their ability to mimic human speech are key reasons they were and are significant to the Native peoples of the U.S. Southwest and Mexican Northwest. Although the birds’ natural habitat is the tropical forests of Mexico and Central and South America, they were present at multiple archaeological sites in the region yet absent at the vast majority. Leading experts in southwestern archaeology explore the reasons why.

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Cardinal in My Window with a Mask on Its Beak

The University of Arizona Press

Winner of the 2021 Ambroggio Prize of the Academy of American Poets

Cardinal in My Window with a Mask on Its Beak offers the insightful voice of a first-generation immigrant to the United States in both Spanish and English. The poems, both fantastical and real, create poetic portraits of historical migrants, revealing shocking and necessary insights into humanity while establishing a transatlantic dialogue with the great voices of the Spanish Renaissance.

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Our Fight Has Just Begun

Hate Crimes and Justice in Native America

The University of Arizona Press

Our Fight Has Just Begunilluminates Native voices while exposing how the justice system has largely failed Native American victims and families. This book tells the untold stories of hate crimes committed against Native Americans in the Four Corners region of the United States.

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