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The University of Arizona Press is the premier publisher of academic, regional, and literary works in the state of Arizona. They disseminate ideas and knowledge of lasting value that enrich understanding, inspire curiosity, and enlighten readers. They advance the University of Arizona’s mission by connecting scholarship and creative expression to readers worldwide.

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Michael Chiago

O’odham Lifeways Through Art

The University of Arizona Press

O’odham artist Michael Chiago Sr.’s paintings provide a window into the lifeways of the O’odham people. This book offers a rich account of how Tohono O’odham and Akimel O’odham live in the Sonoran Desert now and in the recent past.

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Mineralogy of Arizona, Fourth Edition

The University of Arizona Press

This is most comprehensive book yet to describe the minerals known to occur in Arizona. It presents a framework of Arizona’s mineralogy and a set of mineral district maps that can help identify new mineral occurrences. A must-have resource for anyone interested in Arizona minerals, gemstones, fluorescent minerals, and geology.

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LGBTQ Politics in Nicaragua

Revolution, Dictatorship, and Social Movements

The University of Arizona Press

LGBTQ Politics in Nicaragua provides the previously untold history of the LGBTQ community’s emergence as political actors—from revolutionary guerillas to civil rights activists.

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Pachamama Politics

Campesino Water Defenders and the Anti-Mining Movement in Andean Ecuador

The University of Arizona Press

Pachamama Politics examines how campesinos came to defend their community water sources from gold mining upstream and explains why Ecuador’s “pink tide” government came under fire by Indigenous and environmental rights activists.

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The Maya Art of Speaking Writing

Remediating Indigenous Orality in the Digital Age

The University of Arizona Press

Challenging the distinctions between “old” and “new” media and narratives about the deprecation of orality in favor of inscribed forms, The Maya Art of Speaking Writing draws from Maya concepts of tz’ib’ (recorded knowledge) and tzij, choloj, and ch’owen (orality) to look at expressive work across media and languages.

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Finding Right Relations

Quakers, Native Americans, and Settler Colonialism

The University of Arizona Press

Colonialism has the power to corrupt. This important new work argues that even the early Quakers, who had a belief system rooted in social justice, committed structural and cultural violence against their Indigenous neighbors.

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A New Deal for Navajo Weaving

Reform and Revival of Diné Textiles

The University of Arizona Press

A New Deal for Navajo Weaving provides a history of early to mid-twentieth-century Diné weaving projects by non-Natives who sought to improve the quality and marketability of Diné weaving but in so doing failed to understand the cultural significance of weaving and its role in the lives of Diné women.

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Postindian Aesthetics

Affirming Indigenous Literary Sovereignty

The University of Arizona Press

Postindian Aesthetics is a collection of critical, cutting-edge essays on a new generation of Indigenous writers who are creatively and powerfully contributing to a thriving Indigenous literary canon that is redefining the parameters of Indigenous literary aesthetics.

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Latinx Teens

U.S. Popular Culture on the Page, Stage, and Screen

The University of Arizona Press

Latinx Teens examines how Latinx teenagers influence twenty-first-century U.S. popular culture. The book explores the diverse ways that contemporary mainstream film, television, theater, and young adult literature invokes, constructs, and interprets adolescent Latinidad.

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A Love Letter to This Bridge Called My Back

The University of Arizona Press

In 1981, Chicana feminist intellectuals Cherríe Moraga and Gloria Anzaldúa published what would become a foundational legacy for generations of feminist women of color—the seminal This Bridge Called My Back: Writings by Radical Women of Color. To celebrate and honor this important work, editors gloria j. wilson, Joni B. Acuff, and Amelia M. Kraehe offer new generations A Love Letter to This Bridge Called My Back.

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Latinx TV in the Twenty-First Century

The University of Arizona Press

Latinx TV in the Twenty-First Century offers an expansive and critical look at contemporary television by and about U.S. Latinx communities. This volume unpacks the negative implications of older representation and celebrates the progress of new representation, all while recognizing that television still has a long way to go.

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The Greater San Rafael Swell

Honoring Tradition and Preserving Storied Lands

The University of Arizona Press

This book offers the story of how citizens of a small county in the rural West – Emery County, Utah—resolved perhaps the most volatile issue in the region – the future of public lands.
 

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Indigenous Archaeology in the Philippines

Decolonizing Ifugao History

The University of Arizona Press

This book illustrates how descendant communities can take control of their history and heritage through active collaboration with archaeologists. Drawing on the Philippine Cordilleran experiences, Indigenous Archaeology in the Philippines discusses how changing historical narratives help empower peoples who are traditionally ignored in national histories.

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Transforming Diné Education

Innovations in Pedagogy and Practice

The University of Arizona Press

Transforming Diné Education honors the perspectives and voices of Diné educators in culturally relevant education, special education, Diné language revitalization, well-being, tribal sovereignty, self-determination in Diné education, and university-tribal-community partnerships. The contributors offer stories about Diné resilience, resistance, and survival by articulating a Diné-centered pedagogy and politics for future generations.

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American Indian Studies

Native PhD Graduates Gift Their Stories

The University of Arizona Press

Native American doctoral graduates of American Indian Studies (AIS) at the University of Arizona, the first AIS program in the United States to offer a PhD, gift their stories. The Native PhD recipients share their journeys of pursuing and earning the doctorate, and its impact on their lives and communities.

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Barger Gulch

A Folsom Campsite in the Rocky Mountains

The University of Arizona Press

This monograph summarizes findings from nine seasons of excavation at Barger Gulch Locality B, a Folsom campsite in the Colorado Rocky Mountains. Archaeologist Todd A. Surovell explains the spatial organization of the camp and the social organization of the people who lived there.

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The Community-Based PhD

Complexities and Triumphs of Conducting CBPR

The University of Arizona Press

This volume explores the complex and nuanced experience of doing community-based research as a graduate student. Contributors from a range of scholarly disciplines share their experiences with CBPR in the arts, humanities, social sciences, public health, and STEM fields.

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Birds of the Sun

Macaws and People in the U.S. Southwest and Mexican Northwest

The University of Arizona Press

The multiple vivid colors of scarlet macaws and their ability to mimic human speech are key reasons they were and are significant to the Native peoples of the U.S. Southwest and Mexican Northwest. Although the birds’ natural habitat is the tropical forests of Mexico and Central and South America, they were present at multiple archaeological sites in the region yet absent at the vast majority. Leading experts in southwestern archaeology explore the reasons why.

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Cardinal in My Window with a Mask on Its Beak

The University of Arizona Press

Winner of the 2021 Ambroggio Prize of the Academy of American Poets

Cardinal in My Window with a Mask on Its Beak offers the insightful voice of a first-generation immigrant to the United States in both Spanish and English. The poems, both fantastical and real, create poetic portraits of historical migrants, revealing shocking and necessary insights into humanity while establishing a transatlantic dialogue with the great voices of the Spanish Renaissance.

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Our Fight Has Just Begun

Hate Crimes and Justice in Native America

The University of Arizona Press

Our Fight Has Just Begunilluminates Native voices while exposing how the justice system has largely failed Native American victims and families. This book tells the untold stories of hate crimes committed against Native Americans in the Four Corners region of the United States.

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A History of Navajo Nation Education

Disentangling Our Sovereign Body

The University of Arizona Press

On the heels of the fiftieth anniversary of the founding of the Department of Diné Education, this important education history explains how the current Navajo educational system is a complex terrain of power relationships, competing agendas, and jurisdictional battles influenced by colonial pressures and tribal resistance. In providing the historical roots to today’s challenges, Wendy Shelly Greyeyes clears the path and provides a go-to reference to move discussions forward.

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The Book of Wanderers

The University of Arizona Press

The Book of Wanderers is a dynamic short story collection that shows readers what a family of luchadores, a teen on the run, a rideshare driver, a lucid dreamer, a migrant worker in space, a mecha soldier, and a zombie-and-neo-Nazi fighter can have in common. Reyes Ramirez takes readers on a journey through Houston, across dimensions, and all the way to Mars with riveting stories that unpack what it means to be Latinx in contemporary—and perhaps future—America.
 

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Calculating Brilliance

An Intellectual History of Mayan Astronomy at Chich’en Itza

The University of Arizona Press

This book contextualizes the discovery of a Venus astronomical pattern by a female Mayan astronomer at Chich’en Itza and the discovery’s later adaptation and application at Mayapan. Calculating Brilliance brings different intellectual threads together across time and space, from the Classic to the Postclassic, the colonial period to the twenty-first century to offer a new vision for understanding Mayan astronomy.

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Trickster Academy

The University of Arizona Press

Trickster Academy is a collection of poems that explore the experience of being Native in Academia—from land acknowledgement statements, to mascots, to the histories of using Native American remains in anthropology. This collection illuminates the shared experiences of Indians across many regions, and all of us who live amongst Tricksters.

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Navigating CHamoru Poetry

Indigeneity, Aesthetics, and Decolonization

The University of Arizona Press

For the first time, Navigating CHamoru Poetry focuses on Indigenous CHamoru (Chamorro) poetry from the Pacific Island of Guåhan (Guam). In this book, poet and scholar Craig Santos Perez navigates the complex relationship between CHamoru poetry, cultural identity, decolonial politics, diasporic migrations, and native aesthetics.

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Soldiers, Saints, and Shamans

Indigenous Communities and the Revolutionary State in Mexico's Gran Nayar, 1910–1940

The University of Arizona Press

Soldiers, Saints, and Shamans documents how and why the Indigenous Náayari, Wixárika, O’dam, and Mexicanero peoples took part in the Mexican Revolution as they struggled to preserve their cultures, lands, and political autonomy in the face of civil war, bandit raids, and radical political reform. In unpacking the ambiguities that characterize their participation in this tumultuous period, it sheds light on the inner contradictions of the revolution itself.
 
 

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Primitivism and Identity in Latin America

Essays on Art, Literature, and Culture

The University of Arizona Press
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The Sound of Exclusion

NPR and the Latinx Public

The University of Arizona Press

In The Sound of Exclusion, Christopher Chávez critically examines National Public Radio’s professional norms and practices that situate white listeners at the center while relegating Latinx listeners to the periphery. By interrogating industry practices, we might begin to reimagine NPR as a public good that serves the broad and diverse spectrum of the American public.

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Drug Wars and Covert Netherworlds

The Transformations of Mexico's Narco Cartels

The University of Arizona Press

Drug Wars and Covert Netherworlds describes the history of Mexican narco cartels and their regional and organizational trajectories and differences. Covering more than five decades, sociologist James H. Creechan unravels a web of government dependence, legitimate enterprises, and covert connections.

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Decolonizing “Prehistory”

Deep Time and Indigenous Knowledges in North America

The University of Arizona Press

Decolonizing “Prehistory” critically examines and challenges the paradoxical role that modern historical-archaeological scholarship plays in adding legitimacy to, but also delegitimizing, contemporary colonialist practices. Using an interdisciplinary approach, this volume empowers Indigenous voices and offers a nuanced understanding of the American deep past.

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Returning Home

Diné Creative Works from the Intermountain Indian School

The University of Arizona Press

Returning Home features and contextualizes the creative works of Diné (Navajo) boarding school students at the Intermountain Indian School, which was the largest federal Indian boarding school between 1950 and 1984. Diné student art and poetry reveal ways that boarding school students sustained and contributed to Indigenous cultures and communities despite assimilationist agendas and pressures.

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Once Upon the Permafrost

Knowing Culture and Climate Change in Siberia

The University of Arizona Press

Once Upon the Permafrost is a longitudinal climate ethnography about “knowing” a specific culture and the ecosystem that culture physically and spiritually depends on in the twenty-first-century context of climate change. Through careful integration of contemporary narratives, on-site observations, and document analysis, Susan Alexandra Crate shows how local understandings of change and the vernacular knowledge systems they are founded on provide critical information for interdisciplinary collaboration and effective policy prescriptions.

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Voluntourism and Multispecies Collaboration

Life, Death, and Conservation in the Mesoamerican Barrier Reef

The University of Arizona Press

An ethnographic exploration of the world of conservation voluntourism and relations of care between humans and vulnerable species on the Honduran Bay Island of Utila.

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Baja California's Coastal Landscapes Revealed

Excursions in Geologic Time and Climate Change

The University of Arizona Press

Expert geologist and guide Markes E. Johnson takes us on a dozen rambles through wild coastal landscapes on Mexico’s Gulf of California. Descriptions of storm deposits from the geologic past conclude by showing how the future of the Baja California peninsula and its human inhabitants are linked to the vast Pacific Basin and populations on the opposite shores coping with the same effects of global warming.

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Discovering Mars

A History of Observation and Exploration of the Red Planet

The University of Arizona Press

A leading historian of astronomy and a leading planetary scientist who works at the forefront of space exploration provide a comprehensive history of the solar system’s most alluring planet beyond Earth. William Sheehan and Jim Bell chronicle how ancient watchers of the skies attended to Mars’s red color and baffling movements, how three and a half centuries of telescopic observations added vistas and controversies around possible seas and continents and canals, and how the current era of exploration by flyby, orbiter, lander, and rover spacecraft have conjured for us the reality of a world of towering shield volcanoes, vast canyons, ancient dry riverbeds—and even possible evidence of past life. A unique collaboration between two authors on the forefront of Mars explorations, past and future, Discovering Mars provides an ambitious, detailed, and evocative account of humanity’s enduring fascination with the Red Planet.

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Natural Landmarks of Arizona

The University of Arizona Press

Natural Landmarks of Arizona celebrates the vast geological past of Arizona’s natural monuments through the eyes of an author who has called Arizona home for most of his life. In David Yetman’s new book, he shows us how Arizona’s most iconic landmarks were formed millions of years ago and sheds light on more recent histories of these landmarks as well.

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Latin American Immigration Ethics

The University of Arizona Press

Latin American Immigration Ethics advances philosophical conversations and debates about immigration by theorizing migration from the Latin American and Latinx context.

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The Archaeology of Refuge and Recourse

Coast Miwok Resilience and Indigenous Hinterlands in Colonial California

The University of Arizona Press

As an Indigenous scholar researching the history and archaeology of his own tribe, Tsim D. Schneider provides a unique and timely contribution to the growing field of Indigenous archaeology and offers a new perspective on the primary role and relevance of Indigenous places and homelands in the study of colonial encounters.

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Border Women and the Community of Maclovio Rojas

Autonomy in the Spaces of Neoliberal Neglect

The University of Arizona Press

This is a book about hope, struggle, and possibility in the context of gendered violences of racial capitalism on the Mexican side of the U.S.-Mexico border.

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Naturalizing Inequality

Water, Race, and Biopolitics in South Africa

The University of Arizona Press

The book discusses the reproduction and legitimization of racial inequality in post-apartheid South Africa. Michela Marcatelli unravels this inequality paradox through an ethnography of water in a rural region of the country. She documents how calls to save nature have only deepened and naturalized inequality.

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Postcards from the Baja California Border

Portraying Townscape and Place, 1900s–1950s

The University of Arizona Press

Postcards from the Baja California Border uses popular historical imagery—the vintage postcard—to tell a compelling, visually enriched geographical story about the border towns of Baja California.

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The Beloved Border

Humanity and Hope in a Contested Land

The University of Arizona Press

The Beloved Border is a potent and timely report on the U.S.-Mexico border. Though this book tells of the unjust death and suffering that occurs in the borderlands, Davidson gives us hope that the U.S.-Mexico border could be, and in many ways already is, a model for peaceful coexistence worldwide.

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Deuda Natal

The University of Arizona Press

Deuda Natal finds the beauty within vulnerability and the dignity amidst precariousness. As one of the most prominent voices in Puerto Rican poetry, Mara Pastor uses the poems in this new bilingual collection to highlight the way that fundamental forms of caring for life—and for language—can create a space of poetic decolonization.

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Count

The University of Arizona Press

Count is a powerful book-length poem that reckons with the heartbreaking reality of climate change. With sections that vary between poetry, science, Indigenous storytelling, numerical measurement, and narration, Valerie Martínez’s new work results in an epic panorama infused with the timely urgency of facing an apocalyptic future.

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Museum Matters

Making and Unmaking Mexico’s National Collections

The University of Arizona Press

Museum Matters tells the story of Mexico’s national collections through the trajectories of its objects. The essays in this book show the many ways in which things matter and affect how Mexico imagines its past, present, and future.

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Science Be Dammed

How Ignoring Inconvenient Science Drained the Colorado River

The University of Arizona Press

Science Be Dammed is an alarming reminder of the high stakes in the management—and perils in the mismanagement—of water in the western United States. It offers important lessons in the age of climate change and underscores the necessity of seeking out the best science to support the decisions we make.

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Between the Andes and the Amazon

Language and Social Meaning in Bolivia

The University of Arizona Press

Why can’t a Quechua speaker wear pants? Anna M. Babel uses this question to open an analysis of language and social structure at the border of eastern and western, highland and lowland Bolivia. Between the Andes and the Amazon opens new ways of thinking about what it means to be a speaker of an indigenous or colonial language—or a mix of both.

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x/ex/exis

poemas para la nación

The University of Arizona Press

Written in the early days of the rise of world-wide fascism and the poet’s gender transition, x/ex/exis: poemas para la nación/poems for the nation accepts the invitation to push poetic and gender imaginaries beyond the bounds set by nation. For Salas Rivera, the x marks Puerto Rican transness in a world that seeks trans death, denial, and erasure. Instead of justifying his existence, he takes up the flag of illegibility and writes an apocalyptic book that screams into an uncertain future, armed with nothing to lose.

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Letras y Limpias

Decolonial Medicine and Holistic Healing in Mexican American Literature

The University of Arizona Press

Letras y Limpias is the first book to explore the literary significance of the curandera. It offers critical new insights about how traditional medicine and folk healing underwrite Mexican American literature. Amanda Ellis traces the significance of the curandera and her evolution across a variety of genres written by Mexican American authors such as Gloria E. Anzaldúa, Manuel Munoz, ire’ne lara silva, and more.

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The Pluto System After New Horizons

The University of Arizona Press

Once perceived as distant, cold, dark, and seemingly unknowable, Pluto had long been marked as the farthest and most unreachable frontier for solar system exploration. The Pluto System After New Horizons is the benchmark research compendium for synthesizing our understanding of the Pluto system. This volume reviews the work of researchers who have spent the last five years assimilating the data returned from New Horizons and the first full scientific synthesis of this fascinating system.

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