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The University of Arizona Press is the premier publisher of academic, regional, and literary works in the state of Arizona. They disseminate ideas and knowledge of lasting value that enrich understanding, inspire curiosity, and enlighten readers. They advance the University of Arizona’s mission by connecting scholarship and creative expression to readers worldwide.

Showing 481-520 of 1,634 items.

Itch Like Crazy

The University of Arizona Press
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The Environmental Justice Reader

Politics, Poetics, and Pedagogy

The University of Arizona Press
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Urban Voices

The Bay Area American Indian Community

Edited by Susan Lobo; Foreword by Wilma Mankiller and Simon J. Ortiz
The University of Arizona Press
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Adventuring in Arizona

The University of Arizona Press
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Changing Precipitation Regimes and Terrestrial Ecosystems

A North American Perspective

The University of Arizona Press
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When We Arrive

A New Literary History of Mexican America

The University of Arizona Press
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Barren, Wild, and Worthless

Living in the Chihuahuan Desert

The University of Arizona Press
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The Glen Canyon Reader

The University of Arizona Press
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Nampeyo and Her Pottery

The University of Arizona Press
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Work Done Right

The University of Arizona Press
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Mexican Murals in Times of Crisis

The University of Arizona Press
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A Scattering of Jades

Stories, Poems, and Prayers of the Aztecs

Translated by Thelma D. Sullivan; Edited by Timothy J. Knab
The University of Arizona Press
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Naked Wanting

The University of Arizona Press

In these poems, Margo Tamez shows us that the earth is an erotic current linking all beings, a vibrant network of birth, death, and rebirth. Written with the wisdom of one who knows and loves the land, her lyrical meditations speak to the naked wanting in us all.

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Smokechasing

The University of Arizona Press
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Fuel for Growth

The University of Arizona Press

Cities in the arid West would not be what they are today without water and the technology needed to deliver it to users. The history of water development in Arizona goes hand in hand with the state's economic growth, and Arizona's future is inextricably tied to this scarce resource. Fuel for Growth describes and interprets the history of water resource development and its relationship to urban development in Arizona's three signature cities: Phoenix, Tucson, and Flagstaff. These three urban areas could hardly be more different: a growth-oriented metropolis, an environmentally conscious city with deep cultural roots, and an outdoor-friendly mountain town. Despite these differences, their community leaders and public officials have taken similar approaches to developing water resources with varying degrees of success and acceptance. Douglas Kupel has created a new vision of water history based on the Arizona experience. He challenges many of the traditional assumptions of environmental history by revealing that the West's aridity has had relatively little impact on the development of municipal water infrastructure in these cities. While urban growth in the West is often characterized as the product of an elite group of water leaders, the development of Arizona's cities is shown to reflect the broad aspirations of all their citizens. The book traces water development from the era of private water service to municipal ownership of water utilities and examines the impact of the post-World War II boom and subsequent expansion. Taking in the Salt River Project, the Central Arizona Project, and the Groundwater Management Act of 1980, Kupel explores the ongoing struggle between growth and environmentalism. He advocates public policy measures that can sustain a water future for the state. As the urban West enters a new century of water management, Arizona's progress will increasingly be tied to that of its ever-expanding cities. Fuel for Growth documents an earlier era of urban water use and provides important recommendations for the future path of water development in the West's key population centers.

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Salvadorans in Costa Rica

Displaced Lives

The University of Arizona Press
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Smokechasing

The University of Arizona Press

"Painting, architecture, politics, even gardening and golf—all have their critics and commentators," observes Stephen Pyne. "Fire does not." Aside from news reports on fire disasters, most writing about fire appears in government reports and scientific papers—and in journalism that has more in common with the sports page than the editorial page. Smokechasing presents commentaries by one of America's leading fire scholars, who analyzes fire the way another might an election campaign or a literary work.

"Smokechasing" is an American coinage describing the practice of sending firefighters into the wild to track down the source of reported smoke. Now a self-described "friendly fire critic" tracks down more of the history and lore of fire in a collection that focuses on wildland fire and its management. Building on and complementing a previous anthology, World Fire, this new collection features thirty-two original articles and substantial revisions of works that have previously appeared in print.

Pyne addresses many issues that have sparked public concern in the wake of disastrous wildfires in the West, such as fire ecology, federal fire management, and questions relating to fire suppression. He observes that the mistake in fire policy has been not that wildfires are suppressed but that controlled fires are no longer ignited; yet the attempted forced reintroduction of fire through prescribed burning has proved difficult, and sometimes damaging. There are, Pyne argues, many fire problems; some have technical solutions, some not. But there is no evading humanity's unique power and responsibility: what we don't do may be as ecologically powerful as what we do.

Throughout the collection, Pyne makes it clear that humans and fire interact at particular places and times to profoundly shape the world, and that understanding the contexts in which fire occurs can tell us much about the world's natural and cultural landscapes. Fire's context gives it its meaning, and Smokechasing not only helps illuminate those contexts but also shows us how to devise new contexts for tomorrow's fires.

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Borderman

Memoirs of Federico José María Ronstadt

The University of Arizona Press
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Dining at the Lineman's Shack

The University of Arizona Press
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Telling Stories the Kiowa Way

The University of Arizona Press
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Arizona Goes to War

The Home Front and the Front Lines during World War II

Edited by Brad Melton and Dean Smith
The University of Arizona Press
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Edward Abbey

A Life

The University of Arizona Press
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Sharing the Desert

The Tohono O'odham in History

The University of Arizona Press

Sharing the Desert offers a balanced treatment of Tohono O'odham history, considering the primary political, social, and economic events of the Southwest as they affected the tribe. Commissioned as a textbook for use in Tohono O'odham schools, it will serve as an authoritative introduction for anyone seeking to learn about the history of these native people of the Sonoran Desert. Fully endorsed by the Tohono O'odham Tribal Council, it traces the evolution of a distinctive community facing recurring challenges.

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Telling Stories the Kiowa Way

The University of Arizona Press
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A Rush of Hands

The University of Arizona Press
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The Changing Mile Revisited

An Ecological Study of Vegetation Change with Time in the Lower Mile of an Arid and Semiarid Region

The University of Arizona Press
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A Poet's Truth

Conversations with Latino/Latina Poets

The University of Arizona Press
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Blood and Voice

Navajo Women Ceremonial Practitioners

The University of Arizona Press
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Blood Mysteries

The University of Arizona Press
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Being Chinese

Voices from the Diaspora

The University of Arizona Press
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Deception on All Accounts

The University of Arizona Press
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Shapeshift

The University of Arizona Press
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The Shadow’s Horse

The University of Arizona Press
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Writing on the Edge

A Borderlands Reader

Edited by Tom Miller
The University of Arizona Press
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The Return of the Mexican Gray Wolf

Back to the Blue

The University of Arizona Press
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The Return of the Mexican Gray Wolf

The University of Arizona Press

The return of the Mexican gray wolf to Arizona's Blue Range in 1998 marked more than a victory for an endangered species. Long hated by ranchers, the gray wolf had been hunted to the brink of extinction until one woman took on the challenge of restoring it to its natural habitat. Inspired by the plight of the Mexican gray wolf, retiree Bobbie Holaday formed the citizens advocacy group Preserve Arizona's Wolves (P.A.WS.) in 1987 and embarked on a crusade to raise public awareness. She soon found herself in the center of a firestorm of controversy, with environmentalists taking sides against ranchers and neighbors against neighbors. This book tells her story for the first time, documenting her eleven-year effort to bring the gray wolf back to the Blue.

As Holaday quickly learned, ranchers exerted considerable control over the state legislature, and politicians in turn controlled decisions made by wildlife agencies. Even though the wolf had been listed as endangered since 1976, opposition to it was so strong that the Arizona Game and Fish Department had been unable to launch a recovery program. In The Return of the Mexican Gray Wolf, Holaday describes first-hand the tactics she and other ordinary citizens on the Mexican Wolf Recovery Team adopted to confront these obstacles. Enhanced with more than 40 photographs—32 in color—her account chronicles both the triumphs of reintroduction and the heartbreaking tragedies the wolves encountered during early phases.

Thanks to Holaday's perseverance, eleven wolves were released into the wild in 1998, and the Blue Range once again echoed with their howls. Her tenacity was an inspiration to all those she enlisted in the cause, and her story is a virtual primer for conservation activists on mobilizing at the grassroots level. The Return of the Mexican Gray Wolf shows that one person can make a difference in a seemingly hopeless cause and will engage all readers concerned with the preservation of wildlife.

All royalties go to the Mexican Wolf Trust Fund administered by the Arizona Game and Fish Department.

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Chiricahua Mountains

Bridging the Borders of Wildness

By Ken Lamberton; By (photographer) Jeff Garton
The University of Arizona Press
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