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The University of Arizona Press is the premier publisher of academic, regional, and literary works in the state of Arizona. They disseminate ideas and knowledge of lasting value that enrich understanding, inspire curiosity, and enlighten readers. They advance the University of Arizona’s mission by connecting scholarship and creative expression to readers worldwide.

Showing 481-520 of 1,634 items.

The Asturian of Cantabria

Early Holocene Hunter-Gatherers in Northern Spain

The University of Arizona Press
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Carib-Speaking Indians

Culture, Society, and Language

Edited by Ellen B. Basso
The University of Arizona Press
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Homol'ovi II

Archaeology of an Ancestral Hopi Village, Arizona

The University of Arizona Press
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Multidisciplinary Research at Grasshopper Pueblo, Arizona

The University of Arizona Press

This volume presents the results of research from the University of Arizona’s archaeological field school at Grasshopper Pueblo in Arizona. Contributors consider issues of environmental and climactic change; regional and interregional economics; and subsistence change.

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The Chinese of Early Tucson

Historic Archaeology from the Tucson Urban Renewal Project

The University of Arizona Press
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The Darling

The University of Arizona Press

While classic works of literature inspire Caridad’s longing for love, the wisdom she finds in books helps her to end disastrous relationships. Inspired by fictional heroines, Caridad gradually replaces the models they offer with her own life lessons as she struggles for independence and fulfillment.

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Buzzing Hemisphere / Rumor Hemisférico

The University of Arizona Press

Buzzing Hemisphere / Rumor Hemisférico imagines an alternative to the monolingualism of the U.S. literary and political landscape, and it proposes a geo-neuro-political performance attuned to damaged or marginalized forms of knowledge, perception, and identity. Poet Urayoán Noel maps the spaces between and across languages, cities, and bodies, creating a hemispheric poetics that is both broadly geopolitical and intimately neurological.

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Ladies of the Canyons

A League of Extraordinary Women and Their Adventures in the American Southwest

The University of Arizona Press

Ladies of the Canyons is the true story of a group of remarkable women whose lives were transformed by the people and landscape of the American Southwest in the first decades of the twentieth century.

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De Grazia

The Man and the Myths

The University of Arizona Press

This is the first comprehensive biography of artist Ted DeGrazia (1909–1982), who was known as much for his colorful paintings of the Southwest and Mexico as his eccentric personality. De Grazia: The Man and the Myths mines private archival sources, memoirs, and interviews to draw an intriguing new portrait of this western legend.

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Burton Barr

Political Leadership and the Transformation of Arizona

The University of Arizona Press

Arizona House Majority Leader Burton Barr’s leadership style not only illuminated his personality and ideas, but also explained the larger political development of Arizona. Barr’s career is instructive because of his considerable success, the criticism it engendered, and the forces he contested, all taking place during an era of significant change.

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Border Oasis

Water and the Political Ecology of the Colorado River Delta, 1940–1975

The University of Arizona Press
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Across a Great Divide

Continuity and Change in Native North American Societies, 1400–1900

The University of Arizona Press

Archaeological research is uniquely positioned to show how native history and native culture affected the course of colonial interaction, but to do so it must transcend colonialist ideas about Native American technological and social change. This book applies that insight to five hundred years of native history. Using data from a wide variety of geographical, temporal, and cultural settings, the contributors examine economic, social, and political stability and transformation in indigenous societies before and after the advent of Europeans and document the diversity of native colonial experiences. The book’s case studies range widely, from sixteenth-century Florida, to the Great Plains, to nineteenth-century coastal Alaska.

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The Colorado Plateau VI

Science and Management at the Landscape Scale

The University of Arizona Press

With a plethora of updates and insights into land conservation and management questions on the Colorado Plateau, The Colorado Plateau VI is the sixth installment in a series of research on the region. Contributors show how new technologies for monitoring, spatial analysis, restoration, and collaboration improve our understanding, management, and conservation of outcomes at the appropriate landscape scale for the Colorado Plateau.

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From Tribute to Communal Sovereignty

The Tarascan and Caxcan Territories in Transition

The University of Arizona Press

From Tribute to Communal Sovereignty brings together well-regarded scholars to examine both continuity and change over the last five centuries for the indigenous peoples of Central Western Mexico, providing the first sweeping and comprehensive regional history of this important region in Mesoamerica.

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Crafting Identity

Transnational Indian Arts and the Politics of Race in Central Mexico

The University of Arizona Press

Crafting Identity explores the complex interplay of social relations, values, dominations, and performances present in the world of Mexican mask making. The book examines how art, media, and tourism mediate Mexican culture from the margins (“arte popular”), making Mexican indigeneity “palatable” for Mexican nationalism and American and global markets for folklore.

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Taking Charge

Native American Self-Determination and Federal Indian Policy, 1975–1993

The University of Arizona Press
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We Are the State!

Barrio Activism in Venezuela’s Bolivarian Revolution

The University of Arizona Press

We Are the State! provides a new perspective on the Chavistas, a diverse social movement and a driving force behind Venezuela’s social revolution. Cristobal Valencia dramatically challenges top-down understandings of the state and power in Venezuela’s Bolivarian Revolution. His ethnographic research reveals the shift in power relationships and the evolving political practices amongst the Chavistas, the Chávez government, and the larger state apparatus.

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Native Studies Keywords

The University of Arizona Press

Native Studies Keywords is a genealogical project that looks at the history of words that claim to have no history. The end goal is not to determine which words are appropriate but to critically examine words that are crucial to Native studies, in hopes of promoting debate and critical interrogation.

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Mesoamerican Plazas

Arenas of Community and Power

The University of Arizona Press

This is the first book to examine the roles of plazas in ancient Mesoamerica. It argues persuasively that physical interactions among people in communal events were not the outcomes of political machinations held behind the scenes, but were the actual political processes through which people created, negotiated, and subverted social realities.

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Mapping Indigenous Presence

North Scandinavian and North American Perspectives

The University of Arizona Press

Mapping Indigenous Presence promises to become a benchmark for future conversations concerning comparative Indigenous scholarly methodologies. Shanley and Evjen’s work attests to the importance of the roles Indigenous peoples have played as overseers of their own lands and resources and as political entities capable of governing themselves.

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Living with the Dead in the Andes

The University of Arizona Press

Living with the Dead in the Andes provides new data and insights informed by general anthropological theory; the extensive bibliography alone is an important contribution. Scholars working with Andean mortuary practices (and prehistory generally) will be citing these chapters for years.

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Universities and Indian Country

Case Studies in Tribal-Driven Research

The University of Arizona Press

Building on the Harvard Project on American Indian Economic Development’s experience with more than 120 nation-building projects over two decades, Universities and Indian Country posits that the tenets of nation building can provide a strategy for expanding and diversifying universities’ perspectives of knowledge in a multicultural world, while also producing results that are requested by and useful to Native communities. It is a valuable resource for any student, professional, and community member working to assert powers of self-determination, strengthen culture, and develop economies.

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Minorities in Phoenix

A Profile of Mexican American, Chinese American, and African American Communities, 1860-1992

The University of Arizona Press
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The Sagebrush Trail

Western Movies and Twentieth-Century America

The University of Arizona Press

The Sagebrush Trail is a history of Western movies but also a history of twentieth-century America. Richard Aquila’s fast-paced narrative includes classic Westerns such as Stagecoach, A Fistful of Dollars, and Unforgiven. This engaging volume shows how the mythic West continues to ride tall in the saddle along a “sagebrush trail,” which reveals valuable clues about American life and thought.

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Mexican Americans and Health

¡Sana! ¡Sana!

The University of Arizona Press

Mexican Americans and Health, 2nd Edition provides new and updated information on health and health care topics regarding people of Mexican origin. New additions include analysis of emerging diseases and populations, current health-care events, and predictions for the next ten years. De la Torre and Estrada’s collaboration brings scholarship that is both cross-disciplinary and highly readable.

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Mexican Americans and Education

El saber es poder

The University of Arizona Press

In Mexican Americans and Education, Estela Godinez Ballón provides students and educators alike with an indispensable overview of the relationship between Mexican Americans and the U.S. public schooling system. She examines controversial issues, such as standardized testing, segregation, and curriculum tracking, as well as a historical analysis of the barriers that Mexican American students have and continue to regularly face.

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Tributaries

The University of Arizona Press

Tributaries lyrically surveys Shawnee history alongside personal identity and memory. With the eye of a storyteller, poet Laura Da’ creates an arc that flows from the personal to the historical and back again. With narrative content from the period of Indian Removal in the 1830s to the present, the collection is composed of four sections that come together to create an important new telling of Shawnee past and present.

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Occupying Our Space

The Mestiza Rhetorics of Mexican Women Journalists and Activists, 1875–1942

The University of Arizona Press

Occupying our Space examines the contributions of Mexican women journalists and writers during the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, marked as the zenith of Mexican journalism. Through her analysis of the women’s writings, Cristina D. Ramírez coins the phrase rhetorical puestos, or rhetorical public spaces, meant to create an authentic speaking arena for the women. Allowing the women to speak first, Ramírez deftly reframes the conversation about the rhetorical and intellectual role women played in the shifting political and identity culture in Mexico.

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Traditional Arid Lands Agriculture

Understanding the Past for the Future

The University of Arizona Press

Traditional Arid Lands Agriculture offers a unique approach to advancing understanding of traditional agriculture worldwide.  The volume focuses on what is unknown, why and how we can know more, and the specific research needed.

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Living and Leaving

A Social History of Regional Depopulation in Thirteenth-Century Mesa Verde

The University of Arizona Press

Mesa Verde migrations were an integral part of a transformative period that forever changed the course of Pueblo history. Bringing together multiple lines of evidence, including settlement patterns, pottery exchange networks, and changes in ceremonial and civic architecture, Donna M. Glowacki takes a historical perspective that forefronts the social factors underlying the depopulation of Mesa Verde, showing how “living and leaving” were experienced across the region.

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