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The University of Arizona Press is the premier publisher of academic, regional, and literary works in the state of Arizona. They disseminate ideas and knowledge of lasting value that enrich understanding, inspire curiosity, and enlighten readers. They advance the University of Arizona’s mission by connecting scholarship and creative expression to readers worldwide.

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Women Who Stay Behind

Pedagogies of Survival in Rural Transmigrant Mexico

The University of Arizona Press

Women Who Stay Behind examines the social, educational, and cultural resources rural Mexican women employ to creatively survive the conditions created by the migration of loved ones. Using narrative, research, and theory, Ruth Trinidad Galván presents a hopeful picture of what is traditionally viewed as the abject circumstances of poor and working-class people in Mexico who are forced to migrate to survive. 

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Searching for Golden Empires

Epic Cultural Collisions in Sixteenth-Century America

The University of Arizona Press

In Searching for Golden Empires, William K. Hartmann tells a true-life adventure story that recounts the shared history of the United States and Mexico, unveiling episodes both tragic and uplifting. Hernan Cortés, Montezuma, Francisco Vasquez de Coronado, and Viceroy Antonio Mendoza are just some of the principal eyewitnesses in this vivid history of New World exploration.

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Ancient Paquimé and the Casas Grandes World

The University of Arizona Press

Sixteen scholars on both sides of the border present recent research on the economy, history, religion, and far-reaching influence of Casas Grandes. Macaw feathers, copper, shells, ritual mounds, and ball fields all reveal the secrets of Casas Grandes, a massive town whose trading network extended from the Chihuahua Desert up through the American Southwest.

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Reconnaissance in Sonora

Charles D. Poston’s 1854 Exploration of Mexico and the Gadsden Purchase

The University of Arizona Press

Reconnaissance in Sonora is based on Charles D. Poston’s handwritten report about his 1854 journey from San Francisco to Sonora, Mexico, and his return through the Gadsden Purchase territory of southern Arizona. Along the way, C. Gilbert Storms explores the national debate over a route for a transcontinental railroad and the legends of rich gold and silver mines in 1850s northern Mexico.

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George Hunt

Arizona's Crusading Seven-Term Governor

The University of Arizona Press

George Hunt is the political biography of Arizona’s first elected governor, a nuanced, penetrating portrait of a colorful and controversial man. David Berman has written a well-researched, unvarnished portrayal of a complicated and controversial figure, George W. P. Hunt.

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Canto hondo / Deep Song

The University of Arizona Press

Canto hondo / Deep Song includes 106 poems, in both Spanish and English, in the style of Federico García Lorca, which has been compared to “the trilling of birds” and “the natural music of woods and streams.” An important voice in Chicano and GLBT poetry, Alarcón’s new work is his most complex and emotionally powerful published.

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Chasing Arizona

One Man’s Yearlong Obsession with the Grand Canyon State

The University of Arizona Press

It seemed like a simple plan—visit fifty-two places in fifty-two weeks. But for author Ken Lamberton, a forty-five-year veteran of life in the Sonoran Desert, the entertaining results were anything but easy. Chasing Arizona takes readers on a yearlong, twenty-thousand-mile joy ride across Arizona during its centennial, racking up more than two hundred points of interest along the way. This book is an adventure story, a tale of Arizona, and a celebration of what makes the state a great place to visit and live.

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Ponderosa

Big Pine of the Southwest

The University of Arizona Press

After spending almost three decades studying among ponderosa pine trees, Allred shares his experiences and observations in Ponderosa, an introduction to ponderosa pine forests. With color photographs and multidisciplinary explanations throughout, Allred invites readers to join him in his exploration of the forest.

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Twelve Clocks

The University of Arizona Press

Twelve Clocks consists of interconnected poems concerned with various modes of time and its relation to personal and historical events. It transports the reader across six cities around the world while simultaneously traveling through time from the age of Troy to the present.

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Wandering Time

Western Notebooks

The University of Arizona Press

Fleeing a failed marriage and haunted by ghosts of his past, Luis Alberto Urrea jumped into his car and wandered the West from one year’s spring through the next. Hiking into aspen forests and poking alongside creeks in the Rockies, he sought solace and wisdom. As nature opened Urrea’s eyes, writing opened his heart. In journal entries that sparkle with discovery, Urrea ruminates on music, poetry, and the landscape, reminding us all to experience the magic and healing of small gestures, ordinary people, and common creatures. Wandering Time offers Urrea’s most intimate work to date, a luminous account of his own search for healing and redemption.

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Pilgrimage and Healing

The University of Arizona Press
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Cultural Capital

Mountain Zapotec Migrant Associations in Mexico City

The University of Arizona Press
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Battle for the BIA

G.E.E. Lindquist and the Missionary Crusade against John Collier

The University of Arizona Press
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Fluid Arguments

Five Centuries of Western Water Conflict

Edited by Char Miller
The University of Arizona Press
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Planets and Perception

Telescopic Views and Interpretations, 1609-1909

The University of Arizona Press

Winner of the Astronomy Book of the Year from Mercury Magazine (Astronomical Society of the Pacific), Planets and Perception is a provocative book that will intrigue anyone who has ever looked through a telescope. Drawing on both astronomical and psychological data, William Sheehan offers the first systematic analysis of the perceptual and cognitive factors that go into the initial structuring of a planetary image and its subsequent elaboration. Sheehan details the development of lunar and planetary astronomy, underscoring perceptual and psychological themes.

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Nature and Antiquities

The Making of Archaeology in the Americas

The University of Arizona Press

Nature and Antiquities analyzes how the study of indigenous peoples was linked to the study of nature and natural sciences. Leading scholars break new ground and entreat archaeologists to acknowledge the importance of ways of knowing in the study of nature in the history of archaeology.

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Archaeology at El Perú-Waka'

Ancient Maya Performances of Ritual, Memory, and Power

The University of Arizona Press

This is the first book to summarize the results of long-term field research at the major Maya site of Waka’. Bringing together findings from diverse research programs of the El Perú-Waka’ Regional Archaeological Project, its fifteen wide-ranging contributions lead to a greater understanding of the richness and complexity of Classic-period Maya culture.

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Howling for Justice

New Perspectives on Leslie Marmon Silko’s Almanac of the Dead

Edited by Rebecca Tillett
The University of Arizona Press

Almanac of the Dead is a demanding, polarizing, and unique novel. Howling for Justice offers a fresh collection of essays by international scholars that examine and explain some of the book’s key themes in new and useful ways. Included is a never-before-published interview with Leslie Marmon Silko.

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Transformation by Fire

The Archaeology of Cremation in Cultural Context

The University of Arizona Press

Transformation by Fire offers a current assessment of the archaeological research on the widespread social practice of cremation. Editors Ian Kuijt, Colin P. Quinn, and Gabriel Cooney chart a path for the development of interpretive archaeology surrounding this complex social process.

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Constructing Community

The Archaeology of Early Villages in Central New Mexico

The University of Arizona Press

In Constructing Community, Alison E. Rautman uses the Salinas District in New Mexico to examine the relationships of subsistence practices, mobility, and settlement. Rautman tackles a very broad topic: how archaeologists use material evidence to infer and imagine how people lived in the past, how they coped with everyday decisions and tensions, and how they created a sense of themselves and their place in the world.

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Heirloom Seeds and Their Keepers

Marginality and Memory in the Conservation of Biological Diversity

The University of Arizona Press

Heirloom Seeds and Their Keepers offers a much-needed, scientifically researched perspective on the contribution of seedsaving that illustrates its critical significance to the preservation of both cultural knowledge and crop diversity around the world. It opens new conversations between anthropology and biology, and between researchers and practitioners, as it honors conservation as a way of life.

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The Borders of Inequality

Where Wealth and Poverty Collide

By Íñigo Moré; Translated by Lyn Dominguez
The University of Arizona Press

The Borders of Inequality illustrates how longstanding “multidirectional misunderstandings” can exacerbate cross-border problems—and consequent public opinion. Perpetuating these misunderstandings can inflame and complicate the situation, but purposeful efforts to reduce inequality can produce promising results.

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Mestizaje and Globalization

Transformations of Identity and Power

The University of Arizona Press

Mestizaje and Globalization contributes to an emerging multidisciplinary effort to explore how identities are imposed, negotiated, and reconstructed. The volume offers a comprehensive and empirically diverse collection of insights that look beyond nationalistic mestizaje projects to a diversity of local concepts, understandings, and resistance, with particular attention to cases in Latin America and the United States.

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Demigods on Speedway

The University of Arizona Press

Demigods on Speedway is dramatic and poetic, a work of linked stories that together paint a gritty portrait of the Southwest. Well-drawn characters, sprung from Greek mythology into the realities of modern life, face the dilemma of struggling to survive under siege while passionately seeking to make something immortal in their lives.

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Buried in Shades of Night

Contested Voices, Indian Captivity, and the Legacy of King Philip's War

The University of Arizona Press

Billy J. Stratton’s critical examination of Mary Rowlandson’s 1682 publication, The Soveraignty and Goodness of God, reconsiders the role of the captivity narrative in American literary history and national identity. With pivotal new research into Puritan minister Increase Mather’s influence on the narrative, Stratton calls for a reconsideration of past scholarly work on the genre.

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Our Sacred Maíz Is Our Mother

Indigeneity and Belonging in the Americas

The University of Arizona Press

Weaving archival records, ancient maps and narratives, and the wisdom of the elders, Roberto Cintli Rodriguez offers compelling evidence that maíz is the historical connector between Indigenous peoples of this continent. Rodriguez brings together the wisdom of scholars and elders to show how maíz/corn connects the peoples of the Americas.

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Thinking en español

Interviews with Critics of Chicana/o Literature

The University of Arizona Press

Thinking en español takes the important literary figures who shaped our knowledge of Chicano authors and places them in the dynamic arc of Chicana/o criticism and literature. Jesús Rosales interviews foundational Chicana/o literary critics and, through conversations, establishes the path of Chicana/o criticism from 1848 to the present.

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Dragons in the Land of the Condor

Writing Tusán in Peru

The University of Arizona Press

Dragons in the Land of the Condor studies the influence of a Chinese ethnic background in the writing of several twentieth- and twenty-first-century Sino-Peruvian authors. Ignacio López-Calvo considers the different strategies used by Chinese Peruvian writers to claim either their belonging in the Peruvian national project or their difference as a minority ethnic group.

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Creating Aztlán

Chicano Art, Indigenous Sovereignty, and Lowriding Across Turtle Island

The University of Arizona Press

Creating Aztlán interrogates the historic and important role that Aztlán plays in Chicano and Indigenous art and culture. Using the idea that lowriding is an Indigenous way of being in the world, artist and historian Dylan A. T. Miner (Métis) discusses the multiple roles that Aztlán has played at various moments in time, engaging precolonial indigeneities, alongside colonial, modern, and contemporary Xicano responses to colonization.

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Colonial Itineraries of Contemporary Mexico

Literary and Cultural Inquiries

The University of Arizona Press

Colonial Itineraries of Contemporary Mexico analyzes how Mexico’s colonial experience has been reimagined in the twenty-first century. From an interdisciplinary perspective, the fourteen essays gathered in this book question the problematic formation of contemporary marginalities and inequality, imposed political domination, and hybrid subjectivities.

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Therapeutic Nations

Healing in an Age of Indigenous Human Rights

The University of Arizona Press

Therapeutic Nations is one of the first books to demonstrate trauma's wide-ranging historical origins, and it offers a new indigenous feminist critique of the conversation of healing. Million's theoretical sophistication and original research make the book relevant across a range of disciplines as it challenges key concepts of American Indian and indigenous studies.

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Soul Over Lightning

The University of Arizona Press

In this collection, which the poet calls his “rebirth in the search for home,” Ray Gonzalez expresses the gentle, humble intelligence that has made him a leading voice in Latino letters. He shares with the reader the voice of a grounded soul searcher who has passed through middle age and still vibrates with passion for the world. Soul Over Lightning lifts spirits and yet offers a timeless search for home and truth.

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In the Garden of the Bridehouse

The University of Arizona Press

Scrutinizing myth, culture, identity, and sexuality, J. Michael Martinez, in his brave new collection, weds the innovative with the narrative tradition, cultivating a collection that is unlike any other, simultaneously drawing together and pulling apart the familiar and the foreign, the self and the other, the known and the unknowable, the recoverable and irrecoverable past, the historical record and all that is given up for lost. Martinez interrogates the restrictions chosen to constrain imagination’s boundlessness.

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Indigenous Peoples, National Parks, and Protected Areas

A New Paradigm Linking Conservation, Culture, and Rights

Edited by Stan Stevens
The University of Arizona Press

This passionate, well-researched book makes a compelling case for a paradigm shift in conservation practice. It explores new policies and practices, which offer alternatives to exclusionary, uninhabited national parks and wilderness areas and make possible new kinds of protected areas that recognize Indigenous peoples’ rights and benefit from their knowledge and conservation contributions.

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From Enron to Evo

Pipeline Politics, Global Environmentalism, and Indigenous Rights in Bolivia

The University of Arizona Press

Offering a critique of both free-market piracy and the dilemmas of resource nationalism, From Enron to Evo is groundbreaking book for anyone concerned with Indigenous politics, social movements, and environmental justice in an era of expanding resource development.

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Contingent Maps

Rethinking Western Women's History and the North American West

The University of Arizona Press

Contingent Maps is an appeal to all who care about the history of women in the North American West. Susan E. Gray and Gayle Gullett, former co-editors of Frontiers: A Journal of Women Studies, offer in this collection a new approach to women’s history that is firmly rooted in a fresh understanding of place.

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Sinking Suspicions

The University of Arizona Press

Sinking Suspicions offers a heartwarming story of loss and redemption, murder and healing in Oklahoma’s modern-day Indian Country. Mystery writer Sara Sue Hoklotubbe crafts an authentic tale that mixes stolen identity with a fast-paced search for a killer.

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