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The University of Arizona Press is the premier publisher of academic, regional, and literary works in the state of Arizona. They disseminate ideas and knowledge of lasting value that enrich understanding, inspire curiosity, and enlighten readers. They advance the University of Arizona’s mission by connecting scholarship and creative expression to readers worldwide.

Showing 151-180 of 1,637 items.

Talking Indian

Identity and Language Revitalization in the Chickasaw Renaissance

The University of Arizona Press

Talking Indian explores community, tribal identity, and language during rapid economic and demographic shifts in the Chickasaw Nation. These shifts have dramatically impacted who participates in the semiotic trends of language revitalization, as well as their motivations. Jenny L. Davis uncovers how such language processes are intertwined with economic growth.

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Voices from the Ancestors

Xicanx and Latinx Spiritual Expressions and Healing Practices

The University of Arizona Press

Reclaiming and reconstructing one’s spirituality based on non-Western epistemologies is central to the process of decolonization. Voices from the Ancestors brings together reflective writings and spiritual practices by Chicanx, Latinx, and Afro-Latinx womxn and male allies in the United States who seek to heal from the historical traumas of colonization by returning to ancestral traditions and knowledge.

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Mexican Waves

Radio Broadcasting Along Mexico’s Northern Border, 1930–1950

The University of Arizona Press

Mexican Waves takes us to a time before the border’s militarization, when radio entrepreneurs, listeners, and artists viewed the boundary between the United States and Mexico the same way that radio waves did—as fluid and nonexistent. Author Sonia Robles explains how Mexican radio entrepreneurs targeted the Mexican population in the United States decades before U.S. advertising agencies realized the value of the Spanish-language market and demonstrates Mexico’s role in shaping the borderlands.

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Saints, Statues, and Stories

A Folklorist Looks at the Religious Art of Sonora

The University of Arizona Press

Beloved folklorist James S. Griffith introduces us to the roadside shrines, artists, fiestas, saints, and miracles of northern Mexico. Full-color images add to the pleasure of this delightful journey through the churches and towns of Sonora.

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Black Girl Magic Beyond the Hashtag

Twenty-First-Century Acts of Self-Definition

Edited by Julia S. Jordan-Zachery and Duchess Harris; Foreword by Janell Hobson; Afterword by Tammy Owens
The University of Arizona Press

Black Girl Magic Beyond the Hashtag poses the question: how does the #BlackGirlMagic political and cultural movement translate outside of social media? The essays in this volume move us beyond the digital realm and reveals how Black girls and women foster community, counter invisibility, engage in restorative acts, and create spaces for freedom in the face of structural oppression.

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Meditación Fronteriza

Poems of Love, Life, and Labor

The University of Arizona Press

Meditación Fronteriza is a beautifully crafted exploration of life in the Texas-Mexico borderlands. Written by award-winning author Norma Elia Cantú, the poems flow from Spanish to English gracefully as they explore culture, traditions, and solidarity.

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Reel Latinxs

Representation in U.S. Film and TV

The University of Arizona Press

Experts in Latinx pop culture Frederick Luis Aldama and Christopher González explain the real implications of Latinx representation in mainstream TV and film. They also provide a roadmap through a history of mediatized Latinxs that rupture stereotypes and reveal nuanced reconstructions of Latinx subjectivities and experiences.

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Latinx Ciné in the Twenty-First Century

The University of Arizona Press

This timeless volume is a significant analysis of the burgeoning field of Latinx filmmaking. Editor Frederick Luis Aldama has gathered together some of the best writing on Latinx ciné in the twenty-first century. Today’s filmmakers show the world a rich Latinidad informed by a complexly layered culture replete with history, biography, and everyday experiences.

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Aurum

Poems

The University of Arizona Press

The long-awaited new collection by a searing voice in Indigenous poetry.

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Mexican Workers and the Making of Arizona

The University of Arizona Press

Mexican Workers and the Making of Arizona expands our understanding of the critical role played by Mexican and Mexican American laborers in making Arizona a prominent and influential state in the Southwest and beyond.

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Chicano Communists and the Struggle for Social Justice

The University of Arizona Press

Chicano Communists and the Struggle for Social Justice traces the early roots of the Chicano Movement. It follows the thread of radical activism of the 1930s and 1940s to today, showing the depth of its influence on Mexican Americans struggling to achieve social justice and equality. 
 

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Coloniality of the US/Mexico Border

Power, Violence, and the Decolonial Imperative

The University of Arizona Press
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Athapaskan Migrations

The Archaeology of Eagle Lake, British Columbia

The University of Arizona Press
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Global Indigenous Health

Reconciling the Past, Engaging the Present, Animating the Future

The University of Arizona Press

Global Indigenous Health is unique and timely as it deals with the historical and ongoing traumas associated with colonization and colonialism, understanding Indigenous concepts of health and healing, and ways of moving forward for health equity.

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Painting the Skin

Pigments on Bodies and Codices in Pre-Columbian Mesoamerica

The University of Arizona Press

Painting the Skin brings together exciting research on painted skins—human, animal, and vegetal—in Mesoamerica. It offers physicochemical analysis and interdisciplinary understandings of the materiality, uses, and cultural meanings of the colors applied on a multitude of skins, including bodies, codices, and even building “skins.”

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Sonora Yaqui Language Structures

The University of Arizona Press

Sonora Yaqui Language Structures is a valuable source not only for research on this language family but also for anthropological studies of the Arizona-Sonora cultural region. In addition, it documents an indigenous language for future generations of Yaqui speakers.

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Columnar Cacti and Their Mutualists

Evolution, Ecology, and Conservation

The University of Arizona Press
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Sand, Wind, and War

Memoirs of a Desert Explorer

The University of Arizona Press

Records the work, travels, and adventures of one of the last of the great British explorers, a man who served in both world wars and carved out a special niche in science through his studies of desert sands.

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Worlds in the Sky

Planetary Discovery from Earliest Times Through Voyager and Magellan

The University of Arizona Press

William Sheehan gives us a history our fascination with planets, weaving together scientific history, anecdotes surrounding planetary discoveries, and the personal reflections of an incurable amateur astronomer. He describes how we arrived at our current understanding of the Moon and the planets and shows how certain individuals in history shaped the world’s knowledge about the Solar System.

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The Navajo Hunter Tradition

The University of Arizona Press

A new approach to the study of myths relating to the origin of the Navajos. Based on extensive fieldwork and research, including Navajo hunter informants and unpublished manuscripts of Father Berard Haile.

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Dude Lit

Mexican Men Writing and Performing Competence, 1955–2012

The University of Arizona Press
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Reframing the Northern Rio Grande Pueblo Economy

Edited by Scott Ortman
The University of Arizona Press

The archaeological record of the Northern Rio Grande exhibits the hallmarks of economic development, but Pueblo economies were organized in radically different ways than modern industrialized and capitalist economies. Contributors to Reframing the Northern Rio Grande Pueblo Economy explore the patterns and determinants of economic development in pre-Hispanic Rio Grande Pueblo society, building a platform for more broadly informed research on this critical process.

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Indigenous Interfaces

Spaces, Technology, and Social Networks in Mexico and Central America

The University of Arizona Press

Indigenous Interfaces rejects the myth that Indigeneity and information technology are incompatible through its compelling analysis of the relationships between Indigenous peoples and new media. The volume illustrates how Indigenous peoples are selectively and strategically choosing to interface with cybertechnology, highlights Indigenous interpretations of new media, and brings to center Indigenous communities who are resetting modes of communication and redirecting the flow of information. It convincingly argues that interfacing with traditional technologies simultaneously with new media gives Indigenous peoples an edge on the claim to autonomous and sovereign ways of being Indigenous in the twenty-first century.

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Unwriting Maya Literature

Ts'íib as Recorded Knowledge

The University of Arizona Press

Unwriting Maya Literature provides an important decolonial framework for reading Maya and other Indigenous texts. Through insightful analyses of Maya cultural productions—whether textiles or poetry—this perspective offers a point of departure for the study of Maya literature and art that is situated in an Indigenous way of performing the act of reading.

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Challenging Colonial Narratives

Nineteenth-Century Great Lakes Archaeology

The University of Arizona Press

Challenging Colonial Narratives pushes postcolonial thinking in archaeology in socially and politically meaningful directions. Matthew A. Beaudoin calls for more nuanced interpretive frameworks and encourages archaeologists and scholars to focus on the different or similar aspects among sites to explore the nineteenth-century life of contemporaneous Indigenous and settler peoples.
 

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The Davis Ranch Site

A Kayenta Immigrant Enclave in Southeastern Arizona

The University of Arizona Press

In this volume, the results of Rex Gerald’s 1957 excavations at the Davis Ranch site in southeastern Arizona's San Pedro River Valley are reported in their entirety for the first time. Annotations to Gerald’s original manuscript and newly written material place Gerald’s work in the context of what is currently known regarding the late thirteenth-century Kayenta diaspora and the relationship between Kayenta immigrants and the Salado phenomenon.

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Bedouin Ethnobotany

Plant Concepts and Uses in a Desert Pastoral World

The University of Arizona Press
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The Continuous Path

Pueblo Movement and the Archaeology of Becoming

The University of Arizona Press

The Continuous Path challenges archaeologists to take Pueblo concepts of movement seriously by privileging Pueblo concepts of being and becoming in the interpretation of anthropological data. The collaborative volume brings together Native community members, archaeologists, and anthropologists to weave multiple perspectives together to write the histories of Pueblo peoples past, present, and future.

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Transcontinental Dialogues

Activist Alliances with Indigenous Peoples of Canada, Mexico, and Australia

The University of Arizona Press

Transcontinental Dialogues presents innovative discussion, argument, and insight into the interactions between anthropologists and social researchers—both Indigenous and allies—as they negotiate together the terrain of the imposition of ongoing colonialism over Indigenous lives across three countries. The essays explore how scholars can recalibrate their moral, political, and intellectual actions to meet the obligations flowing from the decolonial alliances.
 

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Behind the Mask

Gender Hybridity in a Zapotec Community

The University of Arizona Press

Combines historical analysis, ethnographic field research, and interviews conducted with los muxes of Juchitán, a hybrid third gender, over a period of seven years. Sociologist Alfredo Mirandé observed community events, attended muxe velas, and interviewed both muxes and other Juchitán residents. Prefaced by an overview of the study methods and sample, the book challenges the ideology of a male-dominated Mexican society driven by the cult of machismo, featuring photos alongside four appendixes.

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