Maureen Honey

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Double-Take

A Revisionist Harlem Renaissance Anthology

Rutgers University Press

In this important new anthology, Venetria K. Patton and Maureen Honey bring together a comprehensive selection of texts from the Harlem Renaissance-a key period in the literary and cultural history of the United States. The collection revolutionizes our way of viewing this era, since it redresses the ongoing emphasis on the male writers of this time. Double-Take offers a unique, balanced collection of writers-men and women, gay and straight, familiar and obscure. Arranged by author, rather than by genre, this anthology includes works from major Harlem Renaissance figures as well as often-overlooked essayists, poets, dramatists, and artists.

The editors have included works from a wide variety of genres-poetry, short stories, drama, and essays-allowing readers to understand the true interdisciplinary quality of this cultural movement. Biographical sketches of the authors are provided and most of the pieces are included in their entirety. Double-Take also includes artwork and illustrations, many of which are from original journals and have never before been reprinted. Significantly, Double-Take is the first Harlem Renaissance title to include song lyrics to illustrate the interrelation of various art forms.

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Shadowed Dreams

Women's Poetry of the Harlem Renaissance

Foreword by Nellie McKay; Edited by Maureen Honey
Rutgers University Press

This revised and expanded version of the collection contains twice the number of poems found in the original, many of them never before reprinted, and adds eighteen new female voices from the Harlem Renaissance, once again striking new ground in African American literary history. Also new to this edition are nine period illustrations and updated biographical introductions for each poet.

Shadowed Dreams features new poems by Gwendolyn B. Bennett, Anita Scott Coleman, Mae V. Cowdery, Blanche Taylor Dickinson, Alice Dunbar-Nelson, Jessie Redmon Fauset, Angelina Weld Grimké, Gladys May Casely Hayford (a k a Aquah Laluah), Virginia Houston, Georgia Douglas Johnson, Helene Johnson, Effie Lee Newsome, Esther Popel, and Anne Spencer, as well as writings from rediscovered poets Carrie Williams Clifford, Edythe Mae Gordon, Alvira Hazzard, Gertrude Parthenia McBrown, Beatrice M. Murphy, Lucia Mae Pitts, Grace Vera Postles, Ida Rowland, and Lucy Mae Turner, among others.

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Aphrodite's Daughters

Three Modernist Poets of the Harlem Renaissance

Rutgers University Press

Aphrodite’s Daughters introduces us to Angelina Weld Grimké, Gwendolyn B. Bennett, and Mae V. Cowdery, African American poetic iconoclasts who viewed the female body as a source of strength and transcendence as they pioneered forthright modes of erotic self-expression during the Harlem Renaissance. Drawing from their published and unpublished poetry, along with rare periodicals and biographical materials, Maureen Honey immerses us in the lives of these remarkable women and the world in which they lived.   

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'Madame Butterfly' and 'A Japanese Nightingale'

Two Orientalist Texts

Rutgers University Press

Madame Butterfly (1898) and A Japanese Nightingale (1901) both appeared at the height of American fascination with Japanese culture. These two novellas are paired here together for the first time to show how they defined and redefined contemporary misconceptions of the "Orient." This is the first reprinting of A Japanese Nightingale since its 1901 appearance, when it propelled Winnifred Eaton (using the pseudonym Onoto Watanna) to fame. John Luther Long's Madame Butterfly introduced American readers to the figure of the tragic geisha who falls in love with, and is then rejected by, a dashing American man; the opera Puccini based upon this work continues to enthrall audiences worldwide. Although Long emphasized the insensitivity of Westerners in their dealings with Asian people, the ever-faithful Cho-Cho-San typified Asian subservience and Western dominance. A Japanese Nightingale takes Long's revision several steps further. Eaton's heroine is powerful in her own right and is loved on her own terms. A Japanese Nightingale is also significant for its hidden personal nature. Although Eaton's pen name implied she was Japanese, she was, in fact, of Chinese descent. Living in a society that was virulently anti-Chinese, she used a Japanese screen for her own problematic identity, and A Japanese Nightingale tells us as much about the author's struggle to embrace her Asian heritage as it does about the stereotypes she contests.

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Creating Rosie the Riveter

Class, Gender, and Propaganda during World War II

University of Massachusetts Press
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