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New and Forthcoming in History
The Settler Colonial Invasion of Kahnawà:ke in Nineteenth-Century Canada

The Laws and the Land, an original and impassioned account of the history of the relationship between Canada and Kahnawà:ke, reveals the clash of settler and Indigenous legal traditions and the imposition of settler colonial law on Indigenous peoples and land.

Ethnography, Colonialism, and the Cannibal Dance

Writing the Hamat̓sa critically surveys more than two centuries worth of published, archival, and oral sources to trace the attempted prohibition, intercultural mediation, and ultimate survival of one of Canada’s most iconic Indigenous ceremonies.

Indigenous and Settler Visions of Treaty Making in the Colonies of Vancouver Island and British Columbia

To Share, Not Surrender presents multiple views and lived experience of the treaty-making process and its repercussions in the Colonies of Vancouver Island and British Columbia, and publishes, for the first time, the Vancouver Island Treaties in First Nations languages.

An Ojibway-Anishinabe Vision for the Future

Reframing Manitou Aki (Creator's Land) history from the perspective of the Ojibway-Anishinabe, Our Hearts Are as One Fire shares a vision for the leaders of today and tomorrow.

The Untold Story of the Métis of Western Québec

Bois-Brûlés shatters the prevailing orthodoxy that Métis communities are found solely in western Canada by demonstrating that a distinct community emerged in the fur trade frontier of Quebec in the early nineteenth century and persists to this day.

Reflections on Settler Colonialism in Canada

In this beautifully crafted and written volume, Canada’s preeminent historical geographer traces how Canada’s geographical limitations have shaped the nature of its settler societies – from first contacts, to dispossession, to our current age of reconciliation.

Photography and the Nuclear Era in Canada

The Bomb in the Wilderness is an acutely perceptive analysis of Canada’s nuclear footprint through the medium of photography, revealing how we have represented, interpreted, and remembered nuclear activities since 1945.

Histories of Canada in the Atomic Age

The Nuclear North investigates Canada’s place in the grey area between nuclear and non-nuclear to explore how this has shaped Canadians’ understanding of their country and its policies.

Voyaging to the Icy Latitudes

This first modern study to focus on James Cook’s polar adventures, Captain Cook Rediscovered introduces an entirely new explorer who is more at home along the edge of the polar ice packs than the Pacific’s sandy beaches.

One Hundred Years of Canadian Feminism

In a wide-ranging survey of Canadian feminism from the 1880s to the 1980s, Demanding Equality reveals a continuous, vibrant, and often contentious search for equality, autonomy, and dignity.

Beauty Contests and Settler Femininity

Queen of the Maple Leaf reveals the role of beauty pageants in entrenching settler femininity and white heteropatriarchy at the heart of twentieth-century Canada.

The Times and Life of Mary Ellen Spear Smith

This authoritative biography of Mary Ellen Smith (1863–1933) – British Columbia’s first female MLA, the British Empire’s first female cabinet minister, and a BC suffragist – recovers from obscurity an audacious but imperfect champion in the struggle for greater democracy in early twentieth-century Canada.

Women and the Vote in British Columbia

The first book on the woman’s suffrage movement in British Columbia, A Great Revolutionary Wave traces the history of the fight for the vote from the 1870s to the 1940s against a backdrop of social reform, international social movements, labour politics, and settler colonialism.

Women and the Vote in the Prairie Provinces

This long-overdue account of the suffrage campaigns in the first region to grant women the vote in Canada shatters cherished myths about how the West was won.

Women and the Vote in Quebec

To Be Equals in Our Own Country chronicles the bitter struggle for women’s suffrage in Quebec, the last province to grant Canadian women this fundamental human right.

A Colonial Inheritance Saga

This extraordinary book skillfully blends diverse historical evidence to tell the harrowing story of Caroline Kearney and her struggles against the paternalistic inheritance laws of the nineteenth century colonial world.

Women and Girls of Canada and Newfoundland during the Second World War

Making the Best of It examines the ways in which gender and other identities intersected to shape the experiences of female Canadians and Newfoundlanders during the Second World War.

A New History of British Columbia Politics

A Long Way to Paradise is a lively account of the personalities and ideas that shaped the first hundred years of BC politics and created one of Canada’s most fractious and dynamic political scenes.

The Origins and Legacies of the 1969 Omnibus Bill

No Place for the State is an incisive study that offers complex and often contrasting perspectives on the Trudeau government’s 1969 Omnibus Bill and its impact on sexual and moral politics in Canada.

Disablement, Radicalism, and the Political Life of E.T. Kingsley

Able to Lead tells the forgotten story of the life of double amputee E.T. Kingsley, a pioneering politician, and labour and justice activist.

The Roots and Routes of Canadian Reggae

This insider look at the forces that came together to make Canada’s reggae scene reaffirms the power of music to combat racism and build bridges between communities and cultures.

White Appropriations of Black Masculinities in the Civil Rights Era

Offering fresh insights and raising important questions, this historical exploration of appropriation traces the ways in which gender and race were negotiated through the popular culture of the Civil Rights Era.

Visual Culture at the Banff School of Fine Arts

The first major historical study of the Banff School of Fine Arts, Uplift reveals the foundational role of the school in shaping what is today the globally renowned Banff Centre for Arts and Creativity.

A Political and Diplomatic History

This intriguing study sheds light on Canada’s relationship with Ireland, revealing the origins, trials, and successes of the intimate and at times turbulent connection between the two countries.

Canada and East Timor, 1975–99

Challenge the Strong Wind recounts the story of Canadian policy toward East Timor from the 1975 invasion to the 1999 vote for independence, demonstrating that historical accounts need to include both government and non-governmental perspectives.

Courage, Grief, and Strength in Canada's Great War

Portraits of Battle combines biography and history to offer a nuanced perspective on the complex legacy of the Great War, as told through the stories of those who served in the Canadian Expeditionary Force.

A Nation Shaped by War

With compelling insight, Canada 1919 exposes the ways in which the First World War shaped and changed Canada – and the ways it did not.

Munitions Disposal and Postwar Reconstruction in Canada

War Junk recounts the surprising history of leftover military munitions and supplies, revealing their complex political, economic, social, and environmental legacies in postwar Canada.

Imagining a New "We"

Transforming the Canadian History Classroom is a call for a radically innovative practice that places students – the stories they carry and the histories they want to be part of – at the centre of history education.

History Titles from our Publishing Partners
How Western Civilization Learned About a Wider World

The Great Ages of Discovery is a fascinating conceptual framework for understanding the past 600 years of exploration by Western civilization and its relationship to contemporary society. Stephen J. Pyne expertly organizes the vast narrative of Western exploration into three distinctive ages of discovery.

The Waldorf-Astoria and the Making of a Century

David Freeland explores how the Waldorf-Astoria hotel became an internationally recognized symbol of elegance and luxury while playing an essential role in New York’s rise as a world capital. Featuring such famous guests as Frank Sinatra, Martin Luther King, and Eleanor Roosevelt, the book examines how the hotel dealt with challenges like Prohibition, the Red Scare, and battles over social equality.

New Histories of Mexican American Activism in the Civil Rights Era

Rewriting the Chicano Movement is an insightful new history of the Chicano Movement that expands the meaning and understanding of this seminal historical period in Chicano history. The essays introduce new individuals and struggles previously omitted from Chicano Movement history.

Essays on Bryan D. Palmer, Marxism, and History

The work of Bryan D. Palmer, one of North America’s leading historians, has influenced the fields of labour history, social history, discourse analysis, communist history, and Canadian history, as well as the theoretical frameworks surrounding them. Dissenting Traditions gathers Palmer’s contemporaries, students, and sometimes critics to examine and expand on the topics and themes that have defined Palmer’s career, from labour history to Marxism and communist politics.

Media Ecologies Before Early Modernity

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